Date   

Re: Lettering removal proto 2000 hoppers

Ted Larson
 

This comes to me with high recommendation for lettering removal.  



--
Ted Larson
Trainweb.org/MHRR   ---   GN in 1965   ---   NASG.org 


Re: Tru-Color Primer Questions

Kevin Macomber
 

They are industry standard nozzles, but my recommendation is to use the primer in the bottle and use your airbrush. I think there is better control of thin coats.

Tru-Color is made by them.

More importantly do not mix brands of paint. If your top coat is TC, your primer should be TC. I sell a great deal of their paint and spent time addressing the differences as many of my customers still use Floquil. If you use the same approaches as other paints, you will not get the best results.

Here are some details I have posted.
https://www.narrowgaugemodeling.com/tru-color-paint/

Kevin
NGMC

On 2022-06-25 17:20, Ken Adams wrote:
I was going through the paint section in my local hobby shop and I
came upon a rattle can of TCP-4011 Dark Primer. This was new to me as
I had no previous knowledge that TCP was making any primers. My
standard has been the Tamiya series of surface primers which have
worked well for the last 10 years for me.
Has anyone had relatable experience with the Tru-Color primers and
TCP-4011 Dark Primer in particular. Does it have as good a spray
nozzle as the very reliable Tamiya fine spray products. Does it coat
well on a single pass over raw grey plastic models? Is the spray at
least as fine as the Tamiya primers? The LHS clerk thought it is an
even finer spray than the Tamiya primers.
Does anyone know the provenance of the Tamiya spray can primers. On
the Can it says it is made for manufactured for Tru-Color Paint but no
actual location of manufacture is indicated. Is it truly a US/North
American manufactured product. Of course I know very well that Tamiya
is Japanese in origin and with recent problems with
international/intercontinental supply chains I am always anxious to
develop US/North American product sources whenever possible even if
just as a backup.
Looking forward to answers from other modelers who have actually tried
the Tru-Color rattle can primer product.
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid
Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io
Links:
------
[1] https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/message/193518
[2] https://groups.io/mt/91992102/645454
[3] https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/post
[4] https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/editsub/645454
[5] https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/leave/11334620/645454/765963421/xyzzy
--
Kevin Macomber
NGMC
(717) 474-8399
www.narrowgaugemodeling.com


Re: InterMountain C&O 1937 boxcar with Deco Ends

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Charlie is right at the top of my weathering heros list and I hang on his every word.  There are a wide variety of weathering pencils out there and I think that I have bought most of them.  I just came across a set of Conti pencils which I bought years ago after an article in RMC touted using pencils.  The key is to try different products and find what you are comfortable with.  

I thought that the AK pencils were a water color product that you moistened to use.  I may have these confused with another new product on the market.

Incidently Charlie is in good company on my hero list which includes Armoldd Swartzenegger, John Cena and Clint Eastwood.

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Tru-Color Primer Questions

Ken Adams
 

I was going through the paint section in my local hobby shop and I came upon a rattle can of TCP-4011 Dark Primer.  This was new to me as I had no previous knowledge that TCP was making any primers. My standard has been the Tamiya series of surface primers which have worked well for the last 10 years for me. 

Has anyone had relatable experience with the Tru-Color primers and TCP-4011 Dark Primer in particular. Does it have as good a spray nozzle as the very reliable Tamiya fine spray products.  Does it coat well on a single pass over raw grey plastic models? Is the spray at least as fine as the Tamiya primers? The LHS clerk thought it is an even finer spray than the Tamiya primers. 

Does anyone know the provenance of the Tamiya spray can primers. On the Can it says it is made for manufactured for Tru-Color Paint but no actual location of manufacture is indicated.  Is it truly a US/North American manufactured product.  Of course I know very well that Tamiya is Japanese in origin and with recent problems with international/intercontinental supply chains I am always anxious to develop US/North American product sources whenever possible even if just as a backup. 

Looking forward to answers from other modelers who have actually tried the Tru-Color rattle can primer product.
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: InterMountain C&O 1937 boxcar with Deco Ends

Curt Fortenberry
 


I would suggest getting a color wheel.  It would help decide colors, tones, shades, etc.

Curt Fortenberry 


Re: Vallejo equivalent for PFE orange?

Robert kirkham
 

i’ll give it a look.  Thanks for the suggestion Andy

On Jun 25, 2022, at 1:14 PM, Andy Jackson <lajrmdlr@...> wrote:

=ob
Have you looked at Tru Color Paints PFE orange? They offer a few different shades of that orange.
Andy Jackson


Re: Vallejo equivalent for PFE orange?

Robert kirkham
 

Thanks for the additional comments Ken.  I too really like the self levelling quality of Vallejo - its just great with their airbrush thinner and a brush.

Regarding colour - i realize that any model paint choice is just a starting reference, depending on the wear and tear one wants to model.  I’m tempted to try to model the really yellowed fade evident in some of the Delano photos, but I think that is hard to pull off credibly, and want to start with a close approximate to the fresh paint and experiment.

I model June 1946, Vancouver BC, so miles of rain and mud from California, and 4.5 years after Pearl was bombed and regular maintenance was way down the priority list.   I’m busy looking at various Youtube videos from around that time, showing PFE cars in trains and will try to capture some of that . . .

Still enjoying all the options this hobby invites . . . 

Rob     

On Jun 25, 2022, at 11:47 AM, Ken Adams <smadanek44g@...> wrote:

I too have used the Vallejo Model Color Bright Orange 70.851 for hand brushed PFE Orange sides. The excellent leveling quality of the Model Color paint leaves almost no traces of any brush marks if carefully done. Since my earlier efforts, I now put a drop of Vallejo Airbrush thinner 71.061 to 5-7 drops of paint and it works better than straight from the bottle for hand brushing.

Personally, I think the Bright Orange 70.851 is a slightly brighter color that reflects a bit of the sun bleaching that PFE cars would get after a year in service and 6 or more trips across the country since being painted at Roseville or LA PFE shops.  

I am still using Pledge (whatever J&J marketing calls it this year) for decal preparation after painting. I follow the decaling up with Tamiya TS-80 flat clear and an appropriate light weathering. 

The condition of PFE cars will depend on where you are modeling.  Until the mid 1950's PFE washed the car exterior as they came back empty through Pocatello, Roseville or LA after each trip east. Western produce and fruit shippers expected a clean car to be placed for loading. In the mid fifties the practice of washing after each round trip was dropped. However, for the very end of the steam era it was in place. Of course there were exceptions and modeling reefers after a loaded trip east through the snow sheds of the Sierras behind an oil burning cab forward would justify a slight black patina of burnt bunker oil soot on the roof and sides of the car.  Diesel soot had the same effect. 
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: Vallejo equivalent for PFE orange?

 

=ob
Have you looked at Tru Color Paints PFE orange? They offer a few different shades of that orange.
Andy Jackson


Re: InterMountain C&O 1937 boxcar with Deco Ends

Charlie Duckworth
 

Lloyd
Here’s the pencil and Pan Pastel I used. Also the my well worn brush.  I made sure the pencil was sharp and drew the rust color down either side of the vertical rivet strip.  Then applied the brown pastel over the top of the rivets.  It’s important to apply a small amount of the brown.  If you feel you’ve applied too much use a Q-tip.  

Here’s the roof with black and brown Pan Pastels. 


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: New member checking in

Bruce Smith
 

Ted,

How did you document and analyze your "experience"? The problem with what you say is that it is subject to bias (and is demonstrably false when real data, for specific car types, is used). Memory is unfortunately a terrible instrument to use when facts are needed. 

First, as we have said ad infinitum, you need to specify car type. Coal hoppers? Sure, mostly adjoining roads. Gondolas? The regional road hypothesis holds up pretty well. Boxcars? No, your hypothesis is false. 

So let's talk about boxcar. When looking at each region, did you discount the frequency when you were looking at home road cars on the home road? If you simply look at all the railroads in the middle Atlantic region, there are more PRR cars than expected by the national pool numbers. But that's because the PRR makes up much of the route miles of the middle Atlantic region and you are counting cars on home rails, which is NOT part of this analysis. But, what about PRR cars on the B&O? What's the rate there?

The bottom line is that several extensive analyses, across much of the country, show that non-home road boxcars appear, over time, and many trains, in approximately their proportion of the national fleet. Yes, there are lots of exceptions, for example trains specifically designed to interchange with another road will be biased to that road (but other trains will have proportionally fewer of the same road), and branches with focused traffic, especially when those cars are in pools will be biased to the pool members, but for a general pool of cars, the best data to date says that the national poll percentage will produce the best results. There are and should be more PRR boxcars than SP boxcars on the Northern Pacific. 

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, Al

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Ted Larson via groups.io <mhrreast@...>
Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2022 8:29 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] New member checking in
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
In my experience/observation 
There is a geographic bias to freight car distribution   
Out east more out east cars
Out west more out west cars 
Vs a uniform distribution if the national fleet.  
ie many more PRR cars out east vs out west. 



--
Ted Larson
Trainweb.org/MHRR   ---   GN in 1965   ---   NASG.org 


Re: Vallejo equivalent for PFE orange?

Ken Adams
 

"However, for the very end of the steam era it was in place."  Should read "However, except for the very end of the steam era it was in place." 
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: Vallejo equivalent for PFE orange?

Ken Adams
 

I too have used the Vallejo Model Color Bright Orange 70.851 for hand brushed PFE Orange sides. The excellent leveling quality of the Model Color paint leaves almost no traces of any brush marks if carefully done. Since my earlier efforts, I now put a drop of Vallejo Airbrush thinner 71.061 to 5-7 drops of paint and it works better than straight from the bottle for hand brushing.

Personally, I think the Bright Orange 70.851 is a slightly brighter color that reflects a bit of the sun bleaching that PFE cars would get after a year in service and 6 or more trips across the country since being painted at Roseville or LA PFE shops.  

I am still using Pledge (whatever J&J marketing calls it this year) for decal preparation after painting. I follow the decaling up with Tamiya TS-80 flat clear and an appropriate light weathering. 

The condition of PFE cars will depend on where you are modeling.  Until the mid 1950's PFE washed the car exterior as they came back empty through Pocatello, Roseville or LA after each trip east. Western produce and fruit shippers expected a clean car to be placed for loading. In the mid fifties the practice of washing after each round trip was dropped. However, for the very end of the steam era it was in place. Of course there were exceptions and modeling reefers after a loaded trip east through the snow sheds of the Sierras behind an oil burning cab forward would justify a slight black patina of burnt bunker oil soot on the roof and sides of the car.  Diesel soot had the same effect. 
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: InterMountain C&O 1937 boxcar with Deco Ends

Lloyd Keyser
 

Great looking car Charlie. Could you give a little detail on the pan pastel and pencil of the rivet detail. It's subtle  but very effective. What size brush did you use and was the pencil run down the rivets before or after the PP.?LK

On Sat, Jun 25, 2022 at 1:14 PM Ken Adams <smadanek44g@...> wrote:
The key is in Charlie's first post. Adding the yellow to the paint mix. 

I tried this on a recent box car project using Vallejo Model Color acrylics and it really does change the color tone to give it a more sun bleached character.  I added Vallejo 70.953 Flat Yellow to 70.982 Cavalry Brown and brushed it over the Tamiya Red Oxide Surface Primer coat on a Trix UP 1940 boxcar I am re-building.

Note that the otherwise excellent Trix paint scheme is incorrect for the UP A-50-16 car and the only way to fix it consistently over large areas and apply the NSC UP A-50-16 decal set. 
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: InterMountain C&O 1937 boxcar with Deco Ends

Ken Adams
 

The key is in Charlie's first post. Adding the yellow to the paint mix. 

I tried this on a recent box car project using Vallejo Model Color acrylics and it really does change the color tone to give it a more sun bleached character.  I added Vallejo 70.953 Flat Yellow to 70.982 Cavalry Brown and brushed it over the Tamiya Red Oxide Surface Primer coat on a Trix UP 1940 boxcar I am re-building.

Note that the otherwise excellent Trix paint scheme is incorrect for the UP A-50-16 car and the only way to fix it consistently over large areas and apply the NSC UP A-50-16 decal set. 
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


WTB: National Scale Car MK 105.1 B&O M55 & MK 105.2 B&O M55a Boxcar Mini-kits

 

 

Hello Group, looking to buy the following:

 

National Scale Car MK 105.1 B&O M55 & MK 105.2 B&O M55a Boxcar Mini-kits

 

Please contact me off list

Thanks

Rich Christie

rhcdmc@...


Re: InterMountain C&O 1937 boxcar with Deco Ends

Kevin Macomber
 

On 2022-06-25 09:47, radiodial868 wrote:
One would never know that was at one time an Intermountain RTR car.
--
-------------------
RJ Dial
_Mendocino, CA_
Links:
------
[1] https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/message/193501
[2] https://groups.io/mt/91977013/645454
[3] https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/post
[4] https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/editsub/645454
[5] https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/leave/11334620/645454/765963421/xyzzy
--
Kevin Macomber
NGMC
(717) 474-8399
www.narrowgaugemodeling.com


Re: Vallejo equivalent for PFE orange?

Robert kirkham
 

Thanks Lester.   A nice looking model.  

Rob 

On Jun 25, 2022, at 8:20 AM, Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:

Robert the Vallejo color I have used for PFE reefers is Vallejo Model Color Bright Orange 70.851.  A couple of photos of PFE 60910 airbrushed with this color.  After dry  PollyScale Clear Gloss #F404100 for decal base and after decals applied with Model Master Flat Clear Acryl #4636.

Lester Breuer

<E994D618-7CF0-4977-868A-4C031B5D2D8D.jpeg><45E75E32-C390-4C56-9852-64BF7338E18C.jpeg>


Re: Vallejo equivalent for PFE orange?

Robert kirkham
 

thanks for the suggestion.  I’ve enjoyed AK paints too, but never thought of “rust”, lol.  It does look good.  

AK is a bit of a problem, not easily available most of the shops i buy at, so its always special order.  Valejo is - well, just about everywhere,

Rob 

On Jun 25, 2022, at 4:48 AM, gtws00 via groups.io <gtws00@...> wrote:

I recently completed a pair of WP/PFE R30-9 rebuilds and used AK interactive Light Rust #11105. This is an acrylic much like Vallejo. I found this to be a very close match to a painted Red Caboose R-30 series reefer. 
George Toman
 
<IMG_8507_CA.jpg>


Re: Vallejo equivalent for PFE orange?

Lester Breuer
 

Robert the Vallejo color I have used for PFE reefers is Vallejo Model Color Bright Orange 70.851.  A couple of photos of PFE 60910 airbrushed with this color.  After dry  PollyScale Clear Gloss #F404100 for decal base and after decals applied with Model Master Flat Clear Acryl #4636.

Lester Breuer


Re: Lettering removal proto 2000 hoppers

Jim Betz
 

Hi,

  I have not tried removing the lettering from a P2K hopper - having said that ...

  My go to method for removing factory lettering (which is an ink, not paint or decal) is
isopropyl and rubbing with the side of a round toothpick.  It has never failed to remove
the lettering and rarely affects the base color underneath.  I usually flood the area
with water or isopropyl to get all of the residue bits off.  And I let the first applications
of isopropyl sit on the model "until they start to evaporate" before using the toothpick.
  Rarely takes more than 2 or 3 tries - always works "eventually".   I don't consider
this task to be "quick" but it is easy enough and always works.
                                                                                                       - Jim in the PNW

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