Date   

Re: PFE VS SANTA FE ORANGE

Robert kirkham
 

Thanks for the photos of Richard’s models Tony.  

I don’t have a memory of Richard sharing a lot of photos on email lists like this; my recollection was about the help he provided with model and prototype information - mostly helping someone else’s project.  So it's just awesome that you can share these images.    They speak to me - saying so much about the kind of modelling I want to strive for.

Rob

On Jun 27, 2022, at 11:50 AM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

For completeness, I should mention that the bulk of Richard’s SFRD models were pretty dirty, not like the one I just showed. Below is a more typical example of his view of SFRD appearance. Here Jerry Michel’s comment is VERY relevant.
I should also mention that he worked with Athearn when they did the SFRD frozen food car, Rr-30, IIRC, and it is certainly a light orange.

Tony Thompson




<RR-27.jpg>



Re: PFE VS SANTA FE ORANGE

O Fenton Wells
 

Thanks Tony, and I apologise for coming in late on this but do you know what color Richard used for the Santa Fe reefers?  I have huge respect for his modeling and would love to know his choice of color.
Thanks
Fenton

On Mon, Jun 27, 2022 at 2:50 PM Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:
For completeness, I should mention that the bulk of Richard’s SFRD models were pretty dirty, not like the one I just showed. Below is a more typical example of his view of SFRD appearance. Here Jerry Michel’s comment is VERY relevant.
I should also mention that he worked with Athearn when they did the SFRD frozen food car, Rr-30, IIRC, and it is certainly a light orange.

Tony Thompson







--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: PFE VS SANTA FE ORANGE

Tony Thompson
 

For completeness, I should mention that the bulk of Richard’s SFRD models were pretty dirty, not like the one I just showed. Below is a more typical example of his view of SFRD appearance. Here Jerry Michel’s comment is VERY relevant.
I should also mention that he worked with Athearn when they did the SFRD frozen food car, Rr-30, IIRC, and it is certainly a light orange.

Tony Thompson






Re: PFE VS SANTA FE ORANGE

Tony Thompson
 

Attached is a photo of one of Richard’s cars, and it certainly isn’t Harvest Yellow — at least, not the jar I have of that color.

Tony Thompson



Re: Thoughts on PFE Orange

Tony Thompson
 

Jerry Michels  wrote:

Unless there is a reason to reproduce a fleet of freight cars, reefers included, in their as-delivered scheme, the base color is not terribly important.  A spectrum of color representing the effects of weathering produces much more appealing models.  

As a general statement about modeling, Jerry, I am in full agreement. But for PFE, since they washed cars frequently, I think the statement needs adjustment. Starting with the “right’ color seems to me a good idea for PFE, though less important for many car owners. 

.Tony Thompson




Re: Reefers in Mid WWII film footage

Todd Sullivan
 

Rob,

The lettering pattern of the reefer at 6:49 indicates it was an FGEX or WFEX reefer.

Todd Sullivan


Re: PFE VS SANTA FE ORANGE

Tim O'Connor
 


I forgot to add -- The models are the same color. The difference is lighting.

On 6/27/2022 12:22 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:


Keith Jordan recommended Accupaint MEC Harvest Yellow for SFRD and I really like
the color - close to what Intermountain/Longs put on the SFRD plastic kits for cars a year
or two out of the shop, if not fresh paint.

I've never seen a drift card or sample of the real thing and color photos are all over the place.


On 6/27/2022 12:05 PM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

I’ve been told that SFRD reefer paint was toward the yellow side early and on the orange side later. I’m interested in their appearance circa 1950, where fewer color photos are available.

 

Nelson Moyer



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: PFE VS SANTA FE ORANGE

Robert kirkham
 

very nice models - like that weathering.  Filthy!

Rob

On Jun 27, 2022, at 9:22 AM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Keith Jordan recommended Accupaint MEC Harvest Yellow for SFRD and I really like
the color - close to what Intermountain/Longs put on the SFRD plastic kits for cars a year
or two out of the shop, if not fresh paint.

I've never seen a drift card or sample of the real thing and color photos are all over the place.


On 6/27/2022 12:05 PM, Nelson Moyer wrote:
I’ve been told that SFRD reefer paint was toward the yellow side early and on the orange side later. I’m interested in their appearance circa 1950, where fewer color photos are available.
 
Nelson Moyer


-- 
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts<model_JIMSIX_sfrd_35896_reefer.jpg><model_INTERMOUNTAIN_sfrd_35768_40ft_reefer_Rr-32_weathered_MichaelGross.jpg>


Re: PFE VS SANTA FE ORANGE

Tim O'Connor
 


Keith Jordan recommended Accupaint MEC Harvest Yellow for SFRD and I really like
the color - close to what Intermountain/Longs put on the SFRD plastic kits for cars a year
or two out of the shop, if not fresh paint.

I've never seen a drift card or sample of the real thing and color photos are all over the place.


On 6/27/2022 12:05 PM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

I’ve been told that SFRD reefer paint was toward the yellow side early and on the orange side later. I’m interested in their appearance circa 1950, where fewer color photos are available.

 

Nelson Moyer



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Westerfield USRA SS Ann Arbor boxcar

Robert kirkham
 

I really don’t know, but the resemblance in style makes that a reasonable hypothesis.

Rob

On Jun 27, 2022, at 8:14 AM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


did this lettering change come at the behest of the Wabash ?

On 6/21/2022 11:13 AM, Robert kirkham wrote:
Those kits build into a nice looking model. 

The Ann Arbor lettering always seems more modern to my eyes that most of the other lines.  I wonder why they had the large name so early . . .

Rob   

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: PFE VS SANTA FE ORANGE

Nelson Moyer
 

I’ve been told that SFRD reefer paint was toward the yellow side early and on the orange side later. I’m interested in their appearance circa 1950, where fewer color photos are available.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Monday, June 27, 2022 10:46 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] PFE VS SANTA FE ORANGE

 

Very late in their careers, some of the Santa Fe's ice bunker reefers were painted the same orange usually associated with their later mechanical reefers.
Here is a Chard Walker photo.
Somewhere in my files I have a photo of two Santa Fe ice bunker reefers together, one orange and one yellow.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railroad Citrus Industry Modeling Group

https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup


Re: PFE VS SANTA FE ORANGE

Bob Chaparro
 

Very late in their careers, some of the Santa Fe's ice bunker reefers were painted the same orange usually associated with their later mechanical reefers.
Here is a Chard Walker photo.
Somewhere in my files I have a photo of two Santa Fe ice bunker reefers together, one orange and one yellow.

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railroad Citrus Industry Modeling Group

https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup


Re: Photo: Railroad Yards - Minneapolis, Minnesota (1939)

Tim O'Connor
 


Soo Line on the left, CStPM&O on the right.

On 6/21/2022 12:54 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:

Photo: Railroad Yards - Minneapolis, Minnesota (1939)

Photo from the Library of Congress:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2017718495/resource/

Good assortment of period freight cars.
Bob Chaparro



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Westerfield USRA SS Ann Arbor boxcar

Tim O'Connor
 


did this lettering change come at the behest of the Wabash ?

On 6/21/2022 11:13 AM, Robert kirkham wrote:

Those kits build into a nice looking model. 

The Ann Arbor lettering always seems more modern to my eyes that most of the other lines.  I wonder why they had the large name so early . . .

Rob   

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Thoughts on PFE Orange

Jerry Michels
 

Well said Bill.  Unless there is a reason to reproduce a fleet of freight cars, reefers included, in their as-delivered scheme, the base color is not terribly important.  A spectrum of color representing the effects of weathering produces much more appealing models.  Jerry Michels


Thoughts on PFE Orange

WILLIAM PARDIE
 


Having been a lifelong Southern Pacific modeler I have witnessed  many incarnations of PFE models. Early Silver Streak kits had prepainted sides.  I don't recall anyone questioning the color. Varuous manufacturers of pa
laatic models offered
prepainted models.  An article by Richard Hendrickson on a 1970's Prototyoe Modeler had me carving up a Trains Miniature model .With the advent of the Tichey refers we began to be more sophisticated with our modeling expectations.

In searching my memory bank I recall that at one point Datyight Orange was recommended as the preferred PFE color.  Of course Floquil and Scale coat Daylight Orange are different.  I have settled on Floquil over the years. I'm sure that the Pantone wheel has value but I' sure if some of our top modelers gathered to debate the results it would be difficult to reach agreement.

So what is a modeler to do?   I would suggest that we all select a color that we are comfortable with.
Sihnce most of us weather our models the base color is going to change.  I'm sure that if some of our top modelers bought their PFE models to an RPM meet and created a PFE fruit block we would all be in awe of the train and nobody (well almost nobody) would question the base color.

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: PFE 1940s - Youtube video creator/era/date?

Robert kirkham
 

It turns out that my comment about the returning soldier not likely helping with the dating of the video may have been misplaced.  

In a private email, it was suggested that the auto shown might be a 1941 Buick, and the soldier was apparently a corporal in the 5th Army A-5 division that was activated in Morocco in 1943. The A-5 Division returned to the US in September 1945 and was inactivated by October 1945. Assuming the footage was compiled in approximately the order it was filmed, soldiers return and deactivation would suggest a date for the film as late in 1945 or a few months into 1946. Does anyone on the list have further suggestions or comments?

Rob



On Jun 26, 2022, at 12:11 AM, Robert kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:

Looking for more colour images of freight cars, and this film looked useful for immediate post-WWII PFE reefers starting at 5:29:

1940’S SILENT HOME MOVIE TRIP TO PHOENIX BILTMORE HOTEL, NOGALES AND PICACHO PEAK, ARIZONA 33544


Probably a long shot but i wondered if it is possible to identify the photographer and approx date.

The first car in the train i’d guess is Western Pacific (logo isn’t 100% clear).  
The second has the diagonal “overland” slogan on coloured UP shield, descending left to right.  
Third car is not PFE.  
Fourth and subsequent cars are not profiled enough to make out very well.  However, seconds later, looking at the train from more distance, it is a long string of cars and i would say at least a couple have the black and white SP logo alone on one side.   
(I was not able to say whether any of the UP shields were in black and white only - the light in the image is so bright, i can accept they may be blue, red and white.)

I’d guess there is a returning soldier shown toward the end of the non-train portion, but i doubt that helps with year the film was made.

Anyhow, maybe more informed eyes than mine can narrow the dates.      

Rob


Re: New member checking in

Craig Wilson
 

On a friend's layout, the focal point was the harbor at Frankfort/Elberta Michigan and car ferry dock/yard there.  He visited there on his sailboat every summer.  He knew little of the railroad beyond that yard and it was populated with freight cars that caught his fancy.  After he became interested in prototype operations we helped him with reworking the layout and changing the freight car fleet to better represent the prototype.  We were fortunate enough to get access to a large volume of the car ferry manifests for his era.  I put all the pages into 3-ring binders for the RR's historical society and as I did so, I kept track of the reporting marks and commodities that went through that yard.  Summary pages were made for each month as shown on the attached sheets.  This particular example is for the connection at Manitowoc Wisconsin so there is a higher proportion of Soo Line and CNW cars.  Other manifest sheets cover the connection at Kewaunee and as expected, there are almost no CNW and Soo Line cars but many GB&W cars.

Having this data showed which railroads were underrepresented in his fleet.  And which cars he should probably dispose of (like the three Intermountain C&IM boxcars - one might be there occasionally but there would never be three of them on that railroad at the same time).  New purchases focused on cars to fill the voids (either RTR or cars that could be painted/lettered for the needed prototypes).  It took a while but I vividly remember the op session where I took a break and sat down in a chair overlooking the yard and remarked to my friend "this is the way I remember this yard looking."  The mix of car types and paint schemes just "looked right."  That is the goal - not specific numbers and mixes of cars - but something you and other people familiar with the railroad will recognize.

Craig Wilson



Re: Vallejo Paint Equivalent For PFE Orange (more)

Tony Thompson
 

Nelson Moyer wrote:

Richard is reported to have said that SFRD was close to PRE for the orange.
I never heard that from him, but will emphasize that he had an excellent eye for color, often effortlessly matching paint on pre-painted models. I watched him do it a couple of times and marveled.
He was quite series about everything Santa Fe, including SFRD of course. The SFRD models of his that I have are not particularly close to PFE orange.

Steve Sandifer sent the CMYK and Pantone numbers for SFRD orange from the ATSF paint and lettering book, and I had color swatches printed on a color calibrated printer. The results were surprising, as there was considerable difference between the two, with the Pantone swatch redder and darker.
Pantone is tough to use for this kind of problem. The Pantone numbers are mixes (in round-number percentages) of standard pigments, and can neither serve as a good way to identify any arbitrary color, nor were they meant to. But if you are going to press and want a specific Pantone somewhere in a publication, the printer can nail it, and will. That’s what they are for.

Tony Thompson
tony@...


Re: PFE orange reefers about 1950

Tony Thompson
 

Ed Mines wrote:

From the color Delano photos it looks like many cars needed a new paint job during WWII. In the above video looks like some of the car have been freshly painted.

Tony, did car washing/repainting stop during WWII? 

I’m sure it did in general. For PFE, the shop data exist at CSRM., and I have tabulated all of it. For World War II, PFE continued to paint about three-fourths as many cars as in years right before the war and right after — but they had a big rebuilding program (with the blessing of the War Production Board), and those rebuilds were most of the totals. Washing was well down, like a third of what was done before the war.

Tony Thompson



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