Date   

Re: Accurail single sheathed box cars (was CNJ 12000 series)

Tony Thompson
 

Nice job on the door hangers, Clark. Nice project.

Tony Thompson
tony@...


Re: Accurail single sheathed box cars (was CNJ 12000 series)

O Fenton Wells
 

Looking mighty good Clark
Fenton

On Wed, Jul 13, 2022 at 3:05 PM Clark Propst via groups.io <cepropst=q.com@groups.io> wrote:
Here's what I've managed today.
On the CN car I added a retainer valve and line along with uncoupling levers to the ends and put some Archer rivets and Tichy rivet heads on the top door hangers, then primered. Put some detail on the underside too.
The MIlw car got black tinted  Dullcote on the roof, ends, unframe - A brown tint on the sides - then a off white tint all over. I've removed the masking and have finished decaling one side.
Clark



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Accurail single sheathed box cars (was CNJ 12000 series)

Clark Propst
 

Here's what I've managed today.
On the CN car I added a retainer valve and line along with uncoupling levers to the ends and put some Archer rivets and Tichy rivet heads on the top door hangers, then primered. Put some detail on the underside too.
The MIlw car got black tinted  Dullcote on the roof, ends, unframe - A brown tint on the sides - then a off white tint all over. I've removed the masking and have finished decaling one side.
Clark


Re: maker of small drill bits (#78, #80) for hand drilling resin kits

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Dave,
 
I wasn’t sure of the spelling either, but I know about them nonetheless.  The typically used by sign painters and other artists, and I recall a photo of a painter using one to letter a PRR passenger car.  I just hadn’t thought of using one drilling holes or applying glue or decals.  Great idea though.
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 
From: Dave Parker via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, July 13, 2022 12:15 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] maker of small drill bits (#78, #80) for hand drilling resin kits
 
On Wed, Jul 13, 2022 at 09:00 AM, hockenheim68 wrote:
Are folks with the shakes using maul sticks when working? Isolating and stabilizing your hands can make a big difference.
I had to Google this one, and it's spelled mahl stick (not maul).  Very cool idea that I had never heard of.  Andrew, thanks for the tip.
 
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: maker of small drill bits (#78, #80) for hand drilling resin kits

Dave Parker
 

On Wed, Jul 13, 2022 at 09:00 AM, hockenheim68 wrote:
Are folks with the shakes using maul sticks when working? Isolating and stabilizing your hands can make a big difference.
I had to Google this one, and it's spelled mahl stick (not maul).  Very cool idea that I had never heard of.  Andrew, thanks for the tip.
 
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: maker of small drill bits (#78, #80) for hand drilling resin kits

hockenheim68
 

I've used guitar string forever. Cut as described above but also sometimes hammered and stoned to make a spear point if using larger diameter strings. Started out using fine pins but the string/burr drills worked better. The smallest easily available strings are .007" and they work well with .004" grabs. Done the same for simulated NBWs. They flex and cost literal pennies. They're also very, very sharp, so be careful. I mount mine in Excel knife handles. The collets are soft enough to hold them for a time. Eventually they stop holding and the string drill needs to be kinked and flattened slightly to give the collet something to bite.

For handwork larger than No.80 there's a couple of Huot indexes and for the money I think they've stood up well. They break but really only when dropped. Paid $30 and $5 respectively but even at $60+ I think they're good drills. For perspective a single micro cutter from Harvey or MA Ford can run that.

PS Are folks with the shakes using maul sticks when working? Isolating and stabilizing your hands can make a big difference.

Andrew Hutchinson


Re: Accurail single sheathed box cars (was CNJ 12000 series)

Clark Propst
 

Thanks Dennis, I should revise my statement to say I knew there once was a 1 1/2 casting, but didn't know what it was for or if it was still available. I found one in my 'Door drawer' I could use to try to match the photo Tim O provided. Hopefully today I can do something with my styrene bits to make them look a little better? We'll see?
Clark


Re: Model Realistic Freight Car Loads, by Keith Kohlmann

Brian Carlson
 

That gon didn’t exist before 1960, so who knows it’s in the future. 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Jul 13, 2022, at 12:06 AM, Mark Vinski <mvlandsw@...> wrote:

https://kalmbachhobbystore.com/-/media/files/books/model-trains/bks12838.pdf

This preview shows a B&O plate gondola on page 5. I have pictures of these cars in CSX lettering. Does anyone know if they were ever painted in the Chessie System scheme and if so when ?
If I squint just right I think that I can see remnants of the Chessie emblem on the car pictured in the book.

Mark Vinski

--
Brian J. Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: GATC 1948 design numbers

nyc3001 .
 

The tank behind 25017 looks similar as well, but it looks like it might be 10k gallons. I'm wondering if the dome platform is a later style as the photo seems to be mid-late 50s (?) at the earliest.

-Phil


Re: Model Realistic Freight Car Loads, by Keith Kohlmann

Mark Vinski
 

https://kalmbachhobbystore.com/-/media/files/books/model-trains/bks12838.pdf

This preview shows a B&O plate gondola on page 5. I have pictures of these cars in CSX lettering. Does anyone know if they were ever painted in the Chessie System scheme and if so when ?
If I squint just right I think that I can see remnants of the Chessie emblem on the car pictured in the book.

Mark Vinski


Re: PRR 751202 Palmer, Alfred T., photographer Library of Congress c?1941

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi Jack and List Members,


Jack asked: "It's a pity we can't see more; the horizontal member in the middle of the side is unusual"


Yes, unusual indeed. Perhaps even unique. The gon in question looks just like these gons I photographed at Bethlehem Steel in Bethlehem PA only weeks before the plant closed.


I was so taken by these unique gons, that I can also attach a photo of a scratch-build N scale model!


Thanks Jack for calling my attention to this gon!


Enjoy!


Claus Schlund




On 12-Jul-22 14:33, Jack Mullen wrote:

It's not all scrap in the photo. The pile in the foreground is pig iron, and a nice reference for color and appearance of a load of pigs.

Does anyone recognize the car partly visible at far left?
It's a pity we can't see more; the horizontal member in the middle of the side is unusual.

Jack Mullen


Re: maker of small drill bits (#78, #80) for hand drilling resin kits

Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Tue, Jul 12, 2022 at 10:32 AM, Philip Dove wrote:
At an Nmra convention in Kansas City l attended a clinic on building structures and the person used hypodermic needles for making small holes. The method works in thin plastics and card but the holes are too big for grabs in 3.5 mm scale. 
Actually, the method I described, stoning a diagonal flat on the shank of a broken drill mimics the shape of a hypodermic needle without the hole. It drills soft materials OK, but takes a lot of turns due to cutting via scraping, which is why I suggested driving it in a speed controlled motor tool.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Accurail single sheathed box cars (was CNJ 12000 series)

Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Tue, Jul 12, 2022 at 11:45 AM, Clark Propst wrote:
I’m using some doors I had on hand and had to cut them down to fit. I didn’t know there were doors for this model available? I will modify what I glued on soonly.  ;  ))
Yeah, New England Rail Service (the people who made all the wall sections for modifying Rivarossi Pullman car models) had a kit, but it's off the market now, as far as I know.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Accurail single sheathed box cars (was CNJ 12000 series)

Clark Propst
 

I’m using some doors I had on hand and had to cut them down to fit. I didn’t know there were doors for this model available? I will modify what I glued on soonly.  ;  ))
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: PRR 751202 Palmer, Alfred T., photographer Library of Congress c?1941

Jack Mullen
 

It's not all scrap in the photo. The pile in the foreground is pig iron, and a nice reference for color and appearance of a load of pigs.

Does anyone recognize the car partly visible at far left?
It's a pity we can't see more; the horizontal member in the middle of the side is unusual.

Jack Mullen


Re: maker of small drill bits (#78, #80) for hand drilling resin kits

Philip Dove
 

At an Nmra convention in Kansas City l attended a clinic on building structures and the person used hypodermic needles for making small holes. The method works in thin plastics and card but the holes are too big for grabs in 3.5 mm scale. 


Re: maker of small drill bits (#78, #80) for hand drilling resin kits

Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Mon, Jul 11, 2022 at 04:14 PM, Dave Parker wrote:
I can't remember if I even tried this with PB wire, but I feel it's too soft.  But a steel guitar string?  You bet.  I generally don't even dress the the tip with a stone.  Cutting it with pair of small dikes makes a working tip.  Just need to keep the exposed part to the wire to a minimum.

And yes, slow.  Santa brought me the slowest speed Foredom tool a couple of Christmases back.  This setup works great in resin (and wood), and acceptably in styrene.  I do a lot with 0.008" grabs, so 0.010" wire is a good choice for the drill.
I donno, Tichy's PB wire is pretty hard, much harder than the DA brass wire. I figured I'd suggest it since it could also be used to make the replacement grabs. But I see guitar strings are available in all the diameters a modeler could need, .008, .010. .012, and .013, so likely a better choice for drilling holes. The best part of not having flutes is there is more material in the drill shank, almost twice as much.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Accurail single sheathed box cars (was CNJ 12000 series)

Dennis Storzek <dennis@...>
 

On Tue, Jul 12, 2022 at 08:35 AM, Ian Cranstone wrote:
CN's automobile boxcars had fishbelly centre sills, likely to provide extra strength to compensate for the gap in the body framing to accommodate the wider door opening.
Actually, in this case the 9'-0" auto cars were a derivative of the early 20's boxcars of the same dimensions, and shared the same fishbelly underframe.

Clark, what happened to the door hangers? Don Valentine paid good money to have the proper Camel hangers tooled, and you cut them off???

Dennis Storzek


Re: Model Realistic Freight Car Loads, by Keith Kohlmann

Douglas Harding
 

My family owns a 64½ Mustang convertible. Has always been called that. My stepfather was the 2nd owner, purchasing it from a co-worker. He went with the co-worker to help pick it out when it was purchased new. They were called 64½ because Ford began selling them in the spring of 1964.

 

Doug Harding

https://www.facebook.com/douglas.harding.3156/

Youtube: Douglas Harding Iowa Central Railroad

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of BRIAN PAUL EHNI
Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2022 9:45 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Model Realistic Freight Car Loads, by Keith Kohlmann

 

The caption is incorrect. There were no “1964” Mustangs. All first year Mustangs were sold as 1965 models. Introduced five months prior to the 1965 model year, they have been called “1964 ½”, however. But the titles read 1965.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Mustang#First_generation_(1965–1973)

 

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 


Re: Accurail single sheathed box cars (was CNJ 12000 series)

Ian Cranstone
 

If you had a specific car series in mind, I can likely find a photo. In general though (if I recall correctly), CN's automobile boxcars had fishbelly centre sills, likely to provide extra strength to compensate for the gap in the body framing to accommodate the wider door opening. CN was known to retrofit power brakes to older cars, but I don't think this program was widespread – especially not prior to most of the earlier (and smaller) automobile cars being rebuilt to conventional boxcars beginning in the mid-1930s with removal of the auxiliary door.

Ian Cranstone
Osgoode, Ontario, Canada
lamontc@...


On 2022-07-12 10:35, Clark Propst via groups.io wrote:

Yesterdays and this mornings work. I screwed up on both car's diagonal side bracing. The MILW car should have one at the top and the bottom corners, but because I left the ladder stiles I could easily add them. The CN should have them at the corner tops, not the bottoms.

I took my 50/50 chance that the CN car had a vertical staff hand brake. Can change it if wrong. I have no idea if they had straight or fishbelly center stills? Anyone know about the underframes and hand brakes for these CN cars?
Clark 

3181 - 3200 of 196975