Date   

Re: 40' vs. 50' boxcars

centga@...
 

In a message dated 7/15/03 10:46:38 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
thompson@signaturepress.com writes:



Well, the design wasn't really the steam design. These were 100-ton box
cars of 40-ft. length, so as you can imagine they were built for VERY heavy
loads. Their design certainly postdates this list.

Tony, I meant the 40' car length was pretty much obsolete by then. Todd
Horton


Re: SP F-70-7 Kit Update

Shawn Beckert
 

Interesting. I read the announcement in its entirety to Fred before I sent
it. He approved it word for word, so I'll stand by it as well. Who exactly
is in charge of what is between you and him.

Shawn Beckert

-----Original Message-----
From: BuyGone Treasures [mailto:buygone@earthlink.net]
Sent: Tuesday, July 15, 2003 3:56 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] SP F-70-7 Kit Update


Shawn:

Fred is not one of the Key players in the F-70-6 & 7 flatcars. This project
has been the sole project of Tony and my self. Remember if it is not a
passenger car Fred is not involved. Just to set the record straight.

Paul Koehler

-----Original Message-----
From: Beckert, Shawn [mailto:shawn.beckert@disney.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 15, 2003 1:14 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] SP F-70-7 Kit Update


Fellow Listers,

Just got off the phone with Fred Hill, one of the key
players in the Southern Pacific F-70-7 flatcar kit
project. He's given me permission to give an update on
the kit as long as I don't "name any names".

As of 11 a.m. this morning, the project has been "rescued",
if you will, and is moving forward again. New dies need to
be cut for the underframe, but someone has already been
lined up to do this. If all goes well, a production sample
of the car will be on display at the international hobby
show in Chicago, which IIRC is in September. It will also
be on display at the Southern Pacific Historical Society
convention at Sacramento, California in October. According
to Fred, the cars should be available for purchase by the
end of this year.

Shawn Beckert


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Re: SP F-70-7 Kit Update

BuyGone Treasures <buygone@...>
 

Shawn:

Fred is not one of the Key players in the F-70-6 & 7 flatcars. This project
has been the sole project of Tony and my self. Remember if it is not a
passenger car Fred is not involved. Just to set the record straight.

Paul Koehler

-----Original Message-----
From: Beckert, Shawn [mailto:shawn.beckert@disney.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 15, 2003 1:14 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] SP F-70-7 Kit Update


Fellow Listers,

Just got off the phone with Fred Hill, one of the key
players in the Southern Pacific F-70-7 flatcar kit
project. He's given me permission to give an update on
the kit as long as I don't "name any names".

As of 11 a.m. this morning, the project has been "rescued",
if you will, and is moving forward again. New dies need to
be cut for the underframe, but someone has already been
lined up to do this. If all goes well, a production sample
of the car will be on display at the international hobby
show in Chicago, which IIRC is in September. It will also
be on display at the Southern Pacific Historical Society
convention at Sacramento, California in October. According
to Fred, the cars should be available for purchase by the
end of this year.

Shawn Beckert


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Re: 40' vs. 50" boxcars

centga@...
 

In a message dated 7/15/03 6:08:26 PM Eastern Daylight Time, HAWK0621@aol.com
writes:


Todd,
I don't know if these were the last cars 40' cars built new but ACL bought
PS-1s in 1966, series 25200-25799.
Regards,
Thanks Ed!!!!!


Re: 40' vs. 50' boxcars

centga@...
 

In a message dated 7/15/03 6:20:49 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
timoconnor@attbi.com writes:


Southern Pacific was buying brand new 40 foot box cars as
late as 1977 (B-100-41 class). Why do you ask? It probably
suffices to say they were being built well after 1961, a
time period beyond the scope of STMFC.


Amazing Tim, I figured the last ones were built in the 60's but never figured
that late. While I realize the time era of these cars is past the steam era
the design is from the era. Todd Horton


Prototype Layout Group...PROLG

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

There seems to be some interest by some members in discussing subjects only
remotely related to frt cars. Discussions between several members about
various industries including cement, milk, and cattle have ensued recently.
While these subjects are apprpriate for the STMFC, they are, as I have said,
only acceptable if and when they are directly associated with frt cars.
OTOH, there is another Yahoo group...PROLG...which was established for
discussions about prototype layouts.

PROLG@yahoogroups.com

Discussions about actual industries, their use etc. is perfectly appropriate
on this group as is anything else pertinent to the prototype environment as
it relates to the modeling of a real railroad. This may or may not interest
anyone, but that forum is available for such use so I thought I'd mention
it. The group is currently in open membership status.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner
PROLG Owner


Re: 40' vs. 50' boxcars

Tim O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
 

Southern Pacific was buying brand new 40 foot box cars as
late as 1977 (B-100-41 class). Why do you ask? It probably
suffices to say they were being built well after 1961, a
time period beyond the scope of STMFC.


Does anyone know how late 40' boxcars were being built new? I know that
several roads had rebuilding programs well into the 60's and probably even the 70's
but I'm curious as to when the last 40' cars were built by a freight car
manufacture. Todd Horton

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> -->> NOTE EMAIL CHANGE <<--
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Grab irons on hoppers

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Greg Martin writes:

"Rather than drilling holes for both sides, drill only the holes on the side opposite the corner."

When I was doing the Bowser car I found that drilling the non corner side was a bit difficult because of the smaller width of the upright. I drilled only the corner upright and only one insert did work. I like the idea of not doing the corner, though. Perhaps I'll try the non corner upright on the next one. After you've got some metal grabs on a few cars, the plastic slabs [ imagine the size of the hands on the brakemen that have to hold on to those ] just don't look right.

Mike Brock

Now you don't have to worry about the two side being perfectly parallel and the corner side sits flush to the corner. ACC the drilled end and you will find that the ACC will hold the grab in place. This technique works well on cars with ladder grabs... Nothing worst than a photo or model of a car with grab irons that droop away or stick up when they should be parallel.

Greg Martin


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Boxcar for sale in Minnesota

Steven Delibert <STEVDEL@...>
 

Was browsing the web for barn materials and came across this listing in
Minnesota for an 1840's barn, which includes the line:
"Also available is an old box car - car itself probably worthless, but all
metal fittings are intact"
http://www.bestfarmbuys.com/classifieds/detail.asp?classified_id=11140&categ
ory=Lumber
Don't know any more than that - maybe someone closer Minnesota than I am
wants to run it down and see if it's Great Northern No. 00001 of 1892 or
somesuch.
Steve Delibert


SP F-70-7 Kit Update

Shawn Beckert
 

Fellow Listers,

Just got off the phone with Fred Hill, one of the key
players in the Southern Pacific F-70-7 flatcar kit
project. He's given me permission to give an update on
the kit as long as I don't "name any names".

As of 11 a.m. this morning, the project has been "rescued",
if you will, and is moving forward again. New dies need to
be cut for the underframe, but someone has already been
lined up to do this. If all goes well, a production sample
of the car will be on display at the international hobby
show in Chicago, which IIRC is in September. It will also
be on display at the Southern Pacific Historical Society
convention at Sacramento, California in October. According
to Fred, the cars should be available for purchase by the
end of this year.

Shawn Beckert


Re: Scale Plans--cattle

almabranch <harper-brown@...>
 

Mike and All,
Since I last posted I have done research on some HO cattle to stick
in my Westerfield Santa Fe Sk-2 stock cars. (Mandatory freight car
content.) My sources are a couple of internet sites on Hereford and
Angus beef cattle, and a book recommended by a list member entitled,
A Field Guide To Cows. In these sources two dimensions seem to be
important--hip height,i.e. from hoof to the spine, and hip width,
i.e. the width from hip bone to hip bone. I looked at these
dimensions for Angus and Hereford beef cattle since these are the two
common beef breeds, and we acknowledged on the list that dairy cattle
were not often shipped by rail. I measured samples of all the "HO"
cattle I have on hand using my dial callipers. I also noted the
general configuration of the cows, i.e. body shape, rectangular or
wedge-shaped, and the presence or absence of horns.

First of all I noted that none of my model cattle could pass for
Angus because all of them have horns, and Angus cattle don't have
horns if I read my sources correctly. Therefore I had to determine
how closely the various HO model cattle fit the dimensions of
Hereford cattle, the red ones with white faces. The Walthers cattle
are small. The measurements of these cattle match Hereford males of
about 205 days of age. In other words they would still be considered
calves based on the measurements. My Revell cattle (I believe these
are the same ones offered by Campbell.)are also somewhat small and
fit the measurements of "yearling" cattle. The Life Like cattle fit
the dimensions of mature Herefords of about 3 years of age.
Personally these are my favorites. I also have Model Scene cattle
marketed by Countryside Models. These are painted like dairy cattle
but have the retangular body shape of beef cattle. The dimensions of
these models put them into the three year old mature category. I
also have cattle in two other poses also offered by Countryside
Models under their own label. The males in this group fit the
dimensions of large mature Herefords. The females of this groups are
a few inches taller than the average large mature female Hereford and
the hip width fits a female animal of about a year to 15 months of
age so they are somewhat of an anomally. Hope that helps those who
are interested.

Jared Harper


Re: Stripping Scalecoat II

John Fitts <jefitts2003@...>
 

I'm gonna throw caution to the wind and try either Mr. Muscle (if I can find the stuff in the Chicago area) or Polly S Easy Lift Off. If the resin gets eaten up along with the Scalecoat II, cross off one Westerfield car as a learning experience (adventure?). One good thing though: I typically assemble the main parts of a resin kit with CA and epoxy...so at least it should stay together, whatever else happens. Will post the results presuming I don't asphyxiate in the paint removal process. (Sorry. It's just that I've always had this flair for the dramatic.) Last time I try painting a model when in a foul mood.

John Fitts <jefitts2003@yahoo.com> wrote:Well, to update, I've found a site that heartily recommends Mr. Muscle oven cleaner. "It eats Scalecoat II for breakfast" says the site, so maybe I'll give Mr. Muscle a try. Wish me luck....



Anyone out there have (successful) experience stripping hardened Scalecoat II from polyurethane resin (as in, a Westerfield kit) without giving themselves a good dose of a carcinogen or other toxin in the process?

I've tried the old 91% alcohol treatment; in a very brief test it didn't seem to work. Would rather not go the brake fluid route except as an absolute last resort. Any thoughts, experiences, ideas welcome.

John Fitts






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Re: strirrup steps again

Tim O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
 

Aluminum is a great material for models. My Sunshine Greenville
gondola got damaged at Naperville and the formed aluminum drop-door
was smashed. When I got home, I removed it, reformed it using the
die in the kit, repainted and replaced it. Good as new!

I wish there were dies available for the PS style ends for these
gons, so I could fix my P2K Rock Island and SLSF models... Yeh I
know I'm too lazy to make my own.

I agree with you about Stan's modeling. Trying to save money often
results in great innovations! (Like Andy Miller's dollar bill diaphragms.)
Say, I wonder if a dollar bill would make a good canvas material for
diesel window shades??

Anyone know how to strip the ink from a dollar bill?


Hey Yuze Gize,

Has anyone tried aluminum strips to make small detail parts like this.

Greg Martin

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> -->> NOTE EMAIL CHANGE <<--
Sterling, Massachusetts


Proper STMFC plants

CBarkan@...
 

This isn't freight cars so I'll make it brief. Be wary of collecting present
day plant species and assuming they are representative of your era. A lot of
introduced weed species have proliferated in areas in which they were not
found 50 years ago. They have displaced the native species that might then have
predominated. So now you gotta be a historical botanist too!

As with freight cars, period photos can be a big help.

Chris Barkan

In a message dated 7/14/03 9:57:54 PM, harper-brown@juno.com writes:

<< Mike,

When you're a prototype modeler you have to consider everything. I

have a good book on the wildflowers of Kansas, and another book on

trees so the vegetation on my Alma branch layout will be correctly

modeled. When I visited the Alma branch area one May I collected a

lot of leaves so I will model the correct tree species, not just

generic trees.


Jared Harper >>


Re: 40' vs. 50" boxcars

HAWK0621@...
 

In a message dated 7/15/03 2:37:32 PM, centga@aol.com writes:

Does anyone know how late 40' boxcars were being built new? I know that
several roads had rebuilding programs well into the 60's and probably even
the 70's but I'm curious as to when the last 40' cars were built by a
freight car
manufacture. Todd Horton
Todd,
I don't know if these were the last cars 40' cars built new but ACL bought
PS-1s in 1966, series 25200-25799.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Grab irons on hoppers

Greg Martin
 

Mike and all,

Mike Brock mentioned he was looking for a way to match grab irons on the corners of his covered hopper, if my memory serves me correct

The technique is not a new one but one that works well for me is to remove the original grabs, keep the nebw casting, clip [I use a pair of nail clippers] the grab irons short on corner side and just long enough to hold on the opposite end. Rather than drilling holes for both sides, drill only the holes on the side opposite the corner. Now you don't have to worry about the two side being perfectly parallel and the corner side sits flush to the corner. ACC the drilled end and you will find that the ACC will hold the grab in place. This technique works well on cars with ladder grabs... Nothing worst than a photo or model of a car with grab irons that droop away or stick up when they should be parallel.

Greg Martin


strirrup steps again

Greg Martin
 

Hey Yuze Gize,

Has anyone tried aluminum strips to make small detail parts like this.

Stan "the man" Rydariwiczk (sp?) showed me how he rebuilt the ends of a hopper using this technique. He made new corner pieces, drill them for the grabs and used them for the braces as well. I have experimented with it with good reslults. His source for the aluminum is pie pans... Doesn't say much for his Cholesterol though. This guy is a salt of the earth modeler. The advantage is you cut it, shape it and it has just enough strength to keep the shape and drills real well. I can't see why it wouldn't work for stirrup steps as well. A nice thin profile,ect. It has good impact resistance as well... And as Stan says it's cheap and the pie taste good...3^)[Stan cracks me up!] We need more little seminars from this guy in the future at Cocoa Beach. he will be at naperville as well. Look him up.

Greg Martin


Re: Bowman Milk Company

Ted Schnepf <railsunl@...>
 

Hi Denny and List,

Rails Unlimited has the cars in resin with about 30 different decals including many Chicago diaries (wanzer, Bowman and etc). Visit my website at the address under these messages.

Ted

At 11:02 AM 7/14/2003 -0500, you wrote:

Has anyone produced models of the the milk cars used by the Bowman Milk
Company?

Did Wanzer use milk cars also?

Another express milk car commonly seen in Chicago was Mars (the candy
company). As far as I know, the Mars cars were usually handled by the
Milwaukee in freight trains only, however.

In the '30s until ?, the Milwaukee also had its own Dairy Express Reefers,
all converted from a classic series of very low slung 1912 express cars
built and designed
Rails Unlimited
Ted Schnepf
126 Will Scarlet
Elgin, Ill 60120
847-697-5353 or 847-697-5366
railsunl@foxvalley.net
http://users.foxvalley.net/~railsunl/
Model railroad sales, DCC supplies, Books new and used
O scale urethane cars, Photos and darkroom services
Checks, cash or credit (secure server at web site-3% added)


Re: L&A Howe truss boxcars

Paul Lyons
 

Thanks for the response Jerry. I have the 1938 photo taken by Harold Vollrath, but it does help much. I can't believe somebody didn't shoot one of these guys with the Superior replacement doors.
Paul Lyons
Oceanside. CA


strirrup steps again

ed_mines
 

I like the discontinued Tuttle steps and they seem to hold up pretty
well. The similar A line steps look too round to me, i.e. the bends
aren't sharp.

I've bent 10 X 30 mil Detail Associates wire with varying results -
it's OK for rectangular steps but the more complex shape is near
impossible to bend.

How are the Mylar steps bent? How is it cut? What's the thickness of
the material? Where can you get small quantities?

I can cut thin materials like polystyrene with good repeatability.
Use 2 surgical blades joined together with a spacer and a straight
edge.

While this is not an insurmountable task for many of us in this group
the first timer struggles with the marginal part. Think he'll buy
another $15 kit? $40 kit?

Ed Mines

168481 - 168500 of 189831