Date   

Re: AL&S Mystery Boxcar

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Thursday, September 4, 2003, at 10:18 AM, Beckert, Shawn wrote:

Anybody care to guess the ancestry of this car?

http://community.webshots.com/photo/59178457/59178592aqNbFm

I'm thinking Baltimore & Ohio, maybe an M-26. But when would
the B&O have started selling these off to other railroads?
Shawn:

It's a '1928' variety PRR X29, built in 12-29. The side sheathing is
the giveaway. This was the side sheathing used by the Pennsy from 1928
through the last Dreadnaught ended X29s in 1934.

Regards,
Ted Culotta


AL&S Mystery Boxcar

Shawn Beckert
 

Fellow Listers,

Anybody care to guess the ancestry of this car?

http://community.webshots.com/photo/59178457/59178592aqNbFm

I'm thinking Baltimore & Ohio, maybe an M-26. But when would
the B&O have started selling these off to other railroads?

Shawn Beckert


Re: AT&SF Dry Ice

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

All these cars are in the Refrigerator cars book released by the
SFRH&MS. As the original is out of print and expensive on the used book
market the society has done a " digitally scanned reprint" and it is
available now! Not sure when these cars were built but a good picture in
the book shows a reweigh of SB 6-36.


Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax DCC owner, Chief/Zephyr systems
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


AT&SF Dry Ice Reefer

John R Gibson <gospeltrain1@...>
 

To All & Greg,

he is not a member of our list (but should be )... I'll work on him.
Well Greg in your younger years since you are younger than myself is it
that you do not remember how I am??. I am that same Hoot Gibson that you
see and take with each year at the AT&SF mini-meet in Washington, now do
you remember.

As to my question I had been talking with Ted Culotta and he sent me the
URL
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/calendar/2002/nap02/sfrd6000main.html
which answered my question about the three & four door dry ice reefers
that Charles Slater had drawn the patterns for and of which I had thought
Sunshine had produced these kits but Ted then e-mail me a informed me
that these two dry ice kits are yet to be released when I truly thought
they had been released.

Now as to being a member of the STMFC group. I was a member for a very
long time but as I told Mike Brock since my wife Pat was found to have
lung disease and can no longer do the things that we all take for granted
like dusting a table so I have become the chief cook, bottle washer,
house cleaner & yard maintainer I do not have the time that I used to
have in order to keep up with all the e-mail's that come across the STMFC
list so Mike removed me at my requests but he did allow me to be able to
still get into yahoo and read the messages that are coming across the
list when I can so I have not totally disappeared.

I trust this e-mail explains why I was getting in contact with certain
STMFC members only by there own address and not the entire group but it
is always a delight to hear from any member of the STMFC group OK.

John R. Gibson
gospeltrain1@...
McMinnville, Oregon
AT&SF Steam 1930-1945 Era


Re: AT&SF Dry Ice

Tim O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
 

No mistake, Ted. The earlier Sunshine reefer was much more
conventional looking. I had not seen this one before.


These were in the Sunshine room at Naperville last Fall along with
several other pending releases. Could it have been a mistake or are
they being re-released?

http://www.steamfreightcars.com/calendar/2002/nap02/sfrd6000main.html


Regards,
Ted Culotta

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> -->> NOTE EMAIL CHANGE <<--
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: AT&SF Dry Ice

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Wednesday, September 3, 2003, at 11:58 PM, tgregmrtn@... wrote:

I remember seeing on Sunshine or Westerfield web listing of models the
AT&SF
Dry Ice three small plug door reefer but now that I want to find this
listing
again I cannot find it.

I'm sure that I am not crazy since when I came across the listing I
thought I
was not aware that anyone made a model of this unusual reefer so can
you led
me in the right direction please.

John R. Gibson
These were in the Sunshine room at Naperville last Fall along with
several other pending releases. Could it have been a mistake or are
they being re-released?
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/calendar/2002/nap02/sfrd6000main.html


Regards,
Ted Culotta


Monte's contributions

Bill Welch <bwelch@...>
 

At the risk of embarrassing Monte, I cannot let his comment--"I'm sure I
don't model to the caliber many on this list profess to..."--pass without
comment.

Monte you are certainly one of the people I wish to emulate, not only in
your modeling but your focus. One of things you do is to bring home the fact
that we are modeling a transportation system. By doing something on a
freight car one month and some sort of vehicle the next, you bring that
point home.

Bill Welch


Re: AT&SF Dry Ice

John Fitts <jefitts2003@...>
 

Sunshine had its 16.3 SFRD RR-20 dry ice reefer as rebuilt in 1949. Might that be the model in question? Of course, the model is listed as discontinued in 2002...but who knows whether there are a few lying around somewhere.

tgregmrtn@... wrote:Guys,

Here is a question I can't answer and John "Hoot" Gibson is in the need to
know ... can you help him he is not a member of our list (but should be )...
I'll work on him.

So as you reply please hit reply all...

Subj:
Date: 9/1/2003 8:08:13 AM Pacific Standard Time
From: <A HREF="mailto:gospeltrain1@...">gospeltrain1@...</A>
To: <A HREF="mailto:tgregmrtn@...">tgregmrtn@...</A>
Sent from the Internet (Details)



Hi Greg,

Can I test your memory since mine is failing me somewhat?

I remember seeing on Sunshine or Westerfield web listing of models the AT&SF
Dry Ice three small plug door reefer but now that I want to find this listing
again I cannot find it.

I'm sure that I am not crazy since when I came across the listing I thought I
was not aware that anyone made a model of this unusual reefer so can you led
me in the right direction please.

John R. Gibson
<A HREF="mailto:gospeltrain1@...">gospeltrain1@...</A>
McMinnville, Oregon
AT&SF Steam 1930-1945 Era








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Mike Gruber's address & 470 Club

Bill Welch <bwelch@...>
 

Mike Gruber's address is

Mainline Photos
P.O. Box 411
Portage, WI 53901

Regarding the 470 Club list, I had it at one time but cannot find it now. I
remember it did have several freight car photos, albeit northeastern
prototypes. Although I focus on the southeast and FGEX/WFEX/BREX, I do buy
photos of practically every wood sheathed or early steel boxcar and gondolas
I can lay my hands on since these interchanged so readily, so I will get
another list.

I was inspired to order the 470 list because Bill Dulmaine used their photos
with his "Yankee Clipper" line.

Bill Welch


Re: Photo in 2004 Model Railroader Calendar

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Thomas Olsen wrote:
I went totally into HO in 1957 with a Gilbert American Flyer NYC
Hudson (Sorry, Ben, but I had to start somewhere and that was it!)

You obviously have me confused with that group of SPFs who run around
convinced that if they touch anything New York Central, they'll melt
faster than the Wicked Witch of the West in a downpour. Have you
forgotten who was advocating a NYC USRA-design steel boxcar in
styrene a couple months back? [Mandatory STMFC content.] Remember,
I plan on modeling Englewood in Chicago, and will need a goodly
amount of NYC equipment. (Anyone have an HO scale Mohawk they want
to sell at a reasonable price?)


Ben Hom


Re: Photo in 2004 Model Railroader Calendar

eci305@...
 

Tom Olsen makes alot of good points. We were all beginners at some time.

Lou Ullian
Coon Creek Lumber Co.


Re: 470 club

tim gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

ed_mines wrote:

Anyone familiar with the 470 club? They are offering a list of
negatives for $2. Do they have any freight cars? They charge $9 for
an 8X10.
Try http://www.470rrclub.org/index.php3

Tim Gilbert


Re: 470 club

armprem
 

Good source of locomotive photos.They have a list of available
photos.I don't believe that there are too many freight cars,if
any,however.armprem

----- Original Message -----
From: ed_mines <ed_mines@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thursday, September 04, 2003 4:24 AM
Subject: [STMFC] 470 club


Anyone familiar with the 470 club? They are offering a list of
negatives for $2. Do they have any freight cars? They charge $9 for
an 8X10.

Ed Mines



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470 club

ed_mines
 

Anyone familiar with the 470 club? They are offering a list of
negatives for $2. Do they have any freight cars? They charge $9 for
an 8X10.

Ed Mines


Re: Photo in 2004 Model Railroader Calendar

Thomas Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

Schuyler, Charlie, Tony and friends on the List,

In deference to Mike wanting us to move on from this thread, I could not
leave without putting in my two cents worth. I must agree with Charlie
Vlk regarding Model Railroader's importance to the entire model railroad
hobby. It is the magazine that ties us all together, regardless of
whether you are a vestie or whether you are an RPM.

It carries most of the advertising for products that we all use and is
usually the first magazine that receives the ads from the
manufacturers. It is the magazine that most beginners in the hobby
start with. We cannot forget that before we were RPMs, we were all
beginners and some of us were vesties too. Remember when all that you
could afford was an Athearn box car for $3.00. As a young newcomer and
later when I was raising a family, money was a scarce commodity, so it
was the vestie toys that kept us going. MR is where the beginners find
the toys that they need to get started. Many never get beyond what we
call the toy train stage, but eventually a number of them do!

My first encounter with the scale hobby was through Model Trains
magazine in 1950 that an uncle (who was a PRR brakeman at the time)
bought me. About a year later, I happened upon the November issue of
Model Railroader that our next door neighbor who was a Pennsy conductor
was throwing out. I can still remember one of the lead articles being
"Plastic Lakes and Streams."

I went totally into HO in 1957 with a Gilbert American Flyer NYC Hudson
(Sorry, Ben, but I had to start somewhere and that was it!) freight set
and got hooked on the Pennsy later that year when my neighbor, who was a
year older, started out with an American Flyer PRR B6sb 0-6-0 switcher
set. From there, Penn Line supplied PRR H9s 2-8-0s and other PRR kits
and I had built several small layouts by the time I completed high
school. In the time between high school, I spent a lot of time riding
steam excursions and hanging around with the PRR/RDG/PRSL railroaders at
the freight yards, engine terminals and towers in South Jersey. In 1966
I joined the Silver Valley Model Railroad Club in Camden New Jersey. The
club was a hot bed of structure and equipment builders and out of a
total of 35 members, five of us were PRR modelers and had most of the
road power and rolling stock on the layout. Under the tutelage of a few
of these modelers, I learned how to rebuild brass, assemble those tough
urethane kits and use an air brush. Most of those people are still my
friends today.

By this time I had hired out on the PRR (1965) as a Block Operator and
started taking pictures and collecting all the magazines that were
available at that time. Main Line Modeler under Bob Hundman and Model
Railroading (later RailModel Journal) under Dick Schleicher gave true
prototype modeling a tremendous boost and I became a true believer.
Still, today, there is a tremendous amount that I still do not know, but
through this list and the people who are on it, I can find the
information that I need to continue.

Today, we as prototype modelers, have the greatest array of equipment to
choose from and the largest amount of prototype information that has
ever been assembled to work with. For me, retirement from the real
railroad is only about 6 months away at most. After that, I will have
the time to finally build some of those urethane kits that I have been
squirreling away for the last ten years.

Let us not knock the beginners and the general interest magazines that
they and a lot of us read. It is they who will become the future RPMs
and it is up to us to help them to do so! And yes, the Prototype Police
will have to continue to be vigilant in keeping us from the mis-steps
that sometimes befall us and take us astray! Remember, Life as a
Railroad Prototype Modeler is good!

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
PH: (302) 738-4292
E-Mail: tmolsen@...

Schuyler G Larrabee wrote:


----- Original Message -----
From: <asychis@...>

By the way, just for grins, how many on this list started in model
railroading by reading MR?
Not MR. MT. Model Trains magazine, at least at the very very start,
somewhere around 1953 or 54. I was about 5. But before we moved to "the
new house" when I was 7-not-quite-8, I had found Model Railroader.

How long from that time until you became a prototype
modeler?
I remember thinking that somehow models weren't quite what they could be
while in high school, but I wandered away from modeling at a critical time,
about '67, when I went off to college, architecture school, women, beer,
etc. Critical because I missed out on paying attention to the EL when it
was HAPPENING! I came to, so to speak, while living in the Bay area, and
became aquainted with some of the Colorado Narrow Gauge freaks there, so got
exposed to Serious Modeling then, and to SL&NG Gazette. I've been trying to
get better ever since.

I did, started reading MR at about 12 when I got a subscription for a
gift
and have read it almost continuously since then. I have to admit, though,
the two best days as far as my modeling goes were 1. when I first saw a
copy of
RMC, and 2. when I saw Mainline Modeler #1. That is a magazine that broke
the
mold in my opinion.
As someone else said (Tony T?) MM was obviously intended as a broad-minded
man's Gazette. I sent in my money for the subscription based on a flyer I
got somewhere, before the first issue was out. And wrote a letter of
apology (!) to Gazette when that subscription ran out, explaining that I was
off to standard-gauge land with MM.

SGL


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Re: stupid question

Tim O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
 

Type "internet acronyms" into Google and you get:

http://www.gaarde.org/acronyms/

-----Original Message-----
From: Ted Culotta [mailto:tculotta@...]

So, for the love
of God, what does YMMV stand for? Sorry for being so dense and having
to waste the bandwidth....
IIRC "Your milage may vary". At least AFAIK.

Dave Nelson

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> -->> NOTE EMAIL CHANGE <<--
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Photo in 2004 Model Railroader Calendar

Schuyler G Larrabee <SGL2@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: <asychis@...>

By the way, just for grins, how many on this list started in model
railroading by reading MR?
Not MR. MT. Model Trains magazine, at least at the very very start,
somewhere around 1953 or 54. I was about 5. But before we moved to "the
new house" when I was 7-not-quite-8, I had found Model Railroader.

How long from that time until you became a prototype
modeler?
I remember thinking that somehow models weren't quite what they could be
while in high school, but I wandered away from modeling at a critical time,
about '67, when I went off to college, architecture school, women, beer,
etc. Critical because I missed out on paying attention to the EL when it
was HAPPENING! I came to, so to speak, while living in the Bay area, and
became aquainted with some of the Colorado Narrow Gauge freaks there, so got
exposed to Serious Modeling then, and to SL&NG Gazette. I've been trying to
get better ever since.

I did, started reading MR at about 12 when I got a subscription for a
gift
and have read it almost continuously since then. I have to admit, though,
the two best days as far as my modeling goes were 1. when I first saw a
copy of
RMC, and 2. when I saw Mainline Modeler #1. That is a magazine that broke
the
mold in my opinion.
As someone else said (Tony T?) MM was obviously intended as a broad-minded
man's Gazette. I sent in my money for the subscription based on a flyer I
got somewhere, before the first issue was out. And wrote a letter of
apology (!) to Gazette when that subscription ran out, explaining that I was
off to standard-gauge land with MM.

SGL


AT&SF Dry Ice

Greg Martin
 

Guys,

Here is a question I can't answer and John "Hoot" Gibson is in the need to
know ... can you help him he is not a member of our list (but should be )...
I'll work on him.

So as you reply please hit reply all...

Subj:
Date: 9/1/2003 8:08:13 AM Pacific Standard Time
From: <A HREF="mailto:gospeltrain1@...">gospeltrain1@...</A>
To: <A HREF="mailto:tgregmrtn@...">tgregmrtn@...</A>
Sent from the Internet (Details)



Hi Greg,

Can I test your memory since mine is failing me somewhat?

I remember seeing on Sunshine or Westerfield web listing of models the AT&SF
Dry Ice three small plug door reefer but now that I want to find this listing
again I cannot find it.

I'm sure that I am not crazy since when I came across the listing I thought I
was not aware that anyone made a model of this unusual reefer so can you led
me in the right direction please.

John R. Gibson
<A HREF="mailto:gospeltrain1@...">gospeltrain1@...</A>
McMinnville, Oregon
AT&SF Steam 1930-1945 Era


Re: Photo in 2004 Model Railroader Calendar

Charlie Vlk
 

Thinking about this thread I want to clarify that I don't feel that MR is
"Model Railroading for Idiots" or even for the dreaded Vesties....
my take on MR is that it is a general circulation magazine that should not
be expected to print paragraphs of esoterica that (we on) this list are
concerned with.....
MR is a professional, albeit market-driven corporate, publication that is
IMHO indispensable to the Hobby, and in spite of the occasional
Sellios/Furlow they still do Good Things in every issue.
Just because MR is not the best or proper forum for Steam Era Frieght Car
Modeling and other magazines are does not diminish its value to us....we
still need locomotives and track, without the MR audience we might not have
as many goodies....
Charlie Vlk


Re: Photo in 2004 Model Railroader Calendar

Benjamin Frank Hom <b.hom@...>
 

Jerry Michels wrote:
By the way, just for grins, how many on this list started in model
railroading by reading MR?

MR and RMC were the only magazines carried by bookstores and hobby shops
while I was growing up in Southwest Florida, and I read both as a teenager.
Even then, the early RPI articles and the Protofile series in RMC started to
get me thinking about more realistic models. Then I got selected for a Navy
ROTC scholarship, got turned down by MIT and accepted by RPI in 1985, and
the rest is history.


Ben Hom

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