Date   

Re: GTW rebuild herald

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

Ted,

The background on the tilted wafer herald for the
Grand Trunk Western was green, and not red. At least I
never saw a red one on freight equipment.

Bill Daniels
Tucson, AZ
former GTW brakeman (in a previous existance!)

Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 15:36:24 -0700
From: Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
Subject: GTW rebuild herald

I have a photo of GTW 460305, a steel rebuild of one
of their double
sheathed cars. The logo is a tilted square containing
the underlined
text 'GRAND TRUNK WESTERN'. The logo appears to have
a different color
background than the car. I have heard that this
background was red.
Can anyone confirm? This is not a 'Maple Leaf' logo.

Thank you.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

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Re: Navy Coffee(was: early arrival in Naperville)

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

The most interesting coffee maker I ever ran across
was at a large Naval installation in deepest, darkest
Idaho (yes, Virginia, the Navy does have a large
facility in Idaho) which consisted of a medium urn
with a fabric filter. It was kept clean and made
excellent coffee, well as good as the coffee that was
used.)

I remember full well the barter value of a 5 gallon
can of coffee...I remember our chief using one to
sweeten a deal with another boat to accept a
replacement main steam stop valve (we were short one
for several years) We kept requisitioning one and one
day THREE of them showed up. The SK refused to return
them (he had enough to do without going through the
mountain of paperwork). At least it was better than
float testing them...

Bill Daniels
Tucson, AZ

Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 18:25:06 -0000
From: "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@...>
Subject: Re: early arrival in Naperville

Black, loaded with caffeine, and sort of smells like
it was once
fresh coffee once you get past the burnt odor from it
sitting in the
coffee maker for way too long. Godsend at 0200 on the
Midwatch. Cas
of coffee used as barter with other ships and the
shipyard. Starts
to look good after a month at sea.


Lieutenant Commander Ben Hom

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Re: PRR 604000 series X43 from BLT

Benjamin Frank Hom <b.hom@...>
 

David Lehlbach asked:
"How close is the BLT factory-painted 604000 series to a true PRR X43?"

604000 is a Class X44 50 ft car; Class X43 and subclasses are 40 ft cars.
Which specific Branchline kit are you talking about?


Ben Hom


Re: coffee

Ron Hildebrand <SteamFreight@...>
 

At 03:59 AM 9/27/2003 -0400, Thomas Olsen wrote:
After all, most of the
Colombian heavy duty stuff comes in through the east coast ports and is
shipped (by the boxcar load - proper list content) to those poor guys
out west.

Yes, Tom, but the *roasting* of those beans is done on the west coast...<g> (MFCC: Although most likely in roasters that arrived via Sherman Hill, I'm sure.)

Ron Hildebrand


Re: PRR 604000 series X43 from BLT

Kevin Lafferty <KevinHLafferty@...>
 

David,

You can find a few photos here:
http://prr.railfan.net/freight/classpage.html?class=X43

Kevin Lafferty

-----Original Message-----
From: BNSD45 [mailto:bnsd45@...]
Sent: Friday, September 26, 2003 10:42 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] PRR 604000 series X43 from BLT

So PRR boys -

How close is the BLT factory-painted 604000 series to a true PRR X43?

Also, are there any online photo references to the prototype?

Thanks!
David Lehlbach



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Re: coffee

Thomas Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

Ted, Ben, & Tim,

It is obvious that none of these guys have been east of Pittsburgh for a
long while or maybe not at all! After all, people from Philly who go to
the west coast have to import things like cheese steaks, hoagies (not to
be mistaken for subs!), Tastycakes & pies, pizza and coffee as it is
made in the east. Pizza made in the italian pizzerias in Philly or New
York come in sizes up to cartwheels with everything you can think of as
toppings. One or two of these and you need help to get across the
room! Coffee, made properly, is good for a lot of things from staining
furniture (color does not come off, no matter what you use),
waterproofing basement railroad room walls, or keeping you awake through
those long slide sessions that last to dawn! After all, most of the
Colombian heavy duty stuff comes in through the east coast ports and is
shipped (by the boxcar load - proper list content) to those poor guys
out west.

Tom Olsen
Newark, Delaware

Tim O'Connor wrote:


You guys is all lightweight coffee drinkers. Out here in
God's Country we drink Real Coffee. And if there's any of
it left over, then we mix it with gravel, and use it to pave
our roads with!

P.S. The coffee in Colorado stinks too. I think good coffee
must be a coastal thing. The further inland you go, the worse
it gets.

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> -->> NOTE EMAIL CHANGE <<--
Sterling, Massachusetts


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PRR 604000 series X43 from BLT

bnsd45
 

So PRR boys -

How close is the BLT factory-painted 604000 series to a true PRR X43?

Also, are there any online photo references to the prototype?

Thanks!
David Lehlbach


Re: Seley Hoppers

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

By the by, this discussion prompted me to order one of the O&W Car Shops brass D&H Seley hoppers. Theiy're very reasonably priced (it was $112 with shipping.) Here's a photo of one of Bill Schneider's:

http://www.steamfreightcars.com/modeling/models/schneid/dh1158main.html

Regards,
Ted Culotta


Re: sunshine XM-25

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Friday, September 26, 2003, at 05:29 PM, Kevin Lafferty wrote:

Im in the process of building a Sunshine CB&Q XM-25 (kit 17.1). The
kit
comes with K brake components and I would like to update it with AB
components. Does anyone have any info on the layout of the AB
components on
these cars?
Kevin:

The cylinder was located between the center of the car and under the
door post, closer to the B end. The control valve was located on the
same side of the car, under the door post closest to the A end. The
reservoirs were on the other side of the car, diagonally opposite the
cylinder and out towards the side sill. If this makes no sense, I can
diagram it. Also, some of the cars had shields over the control valves.

Regards,
Ted Culotta


Re: Automobile cars

Larry Smith
 

Bob

American Motors was a minor player in the auto industry and if I'm not
mistaken Kenosha was their only assembly plant. So they would have to
find the means to ship assembled cars. You will notice in the article
that the yard was first used to ship car carriers piggyback style before
the introduction the the racks.

Larry Smith

rwitt_2000 wrote:

Not exactly the case based upon the recent article in RMC about the
specially built yard in Bain, Wisconsin on the C&NW for the American
Motors assembly plant in Kenosha, Wisconsin. It seems to have been
built to utilized the new auto racks for shipment of assembled
automobiles. Plus Kenosha is about as far from either coast as one
can get.

Bob Witt

--- In STMFC@..., Larry Smith <wooddale@b...> wrote:


Now there are less assembly plants and a lot of cars entering the
country on ROROs and the cars are dispatched from large marshalling
yards, thus the need for the autoracks.

Larry Smith



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Re: Automobile cars

Larry Smith
 

Bob

American Motors was a minor player in the automobile industry as was
Studebaker. They weren't as wide spread as the big three.

rwitt_2000 wrote:

Not exactly the case based upon the recent article in RMC about the
specially built yard in Bain, Wisconsin on the C&NW for the American
Motors assembly plant in Kenosha, Wisconsin. It seems to have been
built to utilized the new auto racks for shipment of assembled
automobiles. Plus Kenosha is about as far from either coast as one
can get.

Bob Witt

--- In STMFC@..., Larry Smith <wooddale@b...> wrote:


Now there are less assembly plants and a lot of cars entering the
country on ROROs and the cars are dispatched from large marshalling
yards, thus the need for the autoracks.

Larry Smith



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Re: Amtrak Schedules

Tim O'Connor
 

Jeff, I admire your courage at defending the indefensible. I
have given many thousands of dollars to Amtrak over the years,
but I'm not a customer anymore. I think most people can tolerate
an occasional late arrival -- but after a while not knowing if
you're going to arrive in time for OTHER THINGS you have
planned gets very wearisome. And the absurdity of a train
that travels at under 50 mph in the 21st Century and that
costs 2x-3x as much as flying, is just too ridiculous for
words.


While this can be true, it nonetheless is indicative of a "double
standard" in peoples view of on-time performance. If you were
driving from New York to Chicago and estimated it would take you 13
hours (or consulted AAA who would tell it takes such-and-such number
of hours) and when you actually finished the trip it took 14 hours,
you would not be bitching about how f***ed up everything is that you
couldn't make it in 13 hours. The whole point of traveling by long
distance train is to relax and get your nose off your watch. So the
train gets there at 10 instead of 9 -- so what.

Jeff English
Troy, New York

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> -->> NOTE EMAIL CHANGE <<--
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Amtrak Schedules

Terry Harrison <nkpman@...>
 

Point well taken Jeff.

Like the 4 hour layover example coming up for someone. My thoughts are I'd rather be 2 hours late getting in to Chicago and spend that time on the train, even if it is sitting in a yard looking at all the cars or engines or .........



Terry


Re: Amtrak Schedules

Jeff English
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Justin Kahn" <harumd@h...> wrote:
Dear Spen
Don't count on anything like prompt arrival in Chicago; I took the
Lake
Shore four or five times in the last couple of years and it was
never less
than nearly an hour late and often a good two hours behind.
While this can be true, it nonetheless is indicative of a "double
standard" in peoples view of on-time performance. If you were
driving from New York to Chicago and estimated it would take you 13
hours (or consulted AAA who would tell it takes such-and-such number
of hours) and when you actually finished the trip it took 14 hours,
you would not be bitching about how f***ed up everything is that you
couldn't make it in 13 hours. The whole point of traveling by long
distance train is to relax and get your nose off your watch. So the
train gets there at 10 instead of 9 -- so what.

Jeff English
Troy, New York


Photos

Clark Propst <cepropst@...>
 

There are a few nice older freight car photos at this site.
http://www.castlegraphics.com/graphic/transportation/rail.html
Clark Propst


Re: Automobile Boxcars

Tim O'Connor
 

Tony Thompson wrote

Is this true? Long-distance trucking didn't really take off until about
1960, when enough of the Interstate system was completed to make it
efficient. The ORER sure shows a lot of cars with auto racks right through
the 1950s, until those flatcar racks showed up in the late 1950s. I don't
doubt that railroads were losing some auto shipping during the 1950s, but
the idea that they entirely "lost" it for years seems unrealistic to me.
Does anyone have data, either way?

Remember that the auto industry was de-centralized in the steam era!

Cars were built as close as possible to customers. So the rail share
of auto traffic was not nearly as high as it is nowadays -- I think
it's more than 1/2 of all cars and trucks today, which is astounding
really and means that railroads handle a larger share of new autos
than any other commodity, including coal, grain and steel. (Share as
measured in tons, and not ton-miles.)


I hope you all bought yourselves copies of "New Car Carriers 1910-1998"
(publisher: Iconografix) which contains a wealth of fabulous pictures
and insights into the steam era auto industry --

Did you know there were river barges for carrying autos?

Did you know Detroit shipped new autos to Chicago, Duluth, Cleveland,
Buffalo, Milwaukee by lake freighter? (In 1928 several hundred thousand
cars were loaded at Great Lakes ports.)

Did you know coastal ships carried new Fords from Richmond California
to Los Angeles, Portland and Seattle?


The book mentions that deregulation BEGINNING in 1958 allowed railroads
to innovate, and begin getting a larger share of new auto traffic. To be
sure they lost lots of traffic to highways from 1946 to the early 60's
before that trend was reversed. The Interstate System coincided with the
REVIVAL of railroad market share in new autos!


Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> -->> NOTE EMAIL CHANGE <<--
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: AAR 50' End-Door Automobile Boxcars (Grain Load Lines)

Terry Harrison <nkpman@...>
 

I will try to make it down those 20 miles this weekend and photo those GTW 50' cars. If I can get inside I'll measure those grain lines and take pics.

Terry


Re: AAR 50' End-Door Automobile Boxcars

Clark Propst <cepropst@...>
 

Shawn,
I sent John Nehrich a Soph Marty jpeg of a GTW car with the end doors
open. It would have been taken in the late 50's early 60's. I remember
giving the shot the wrong location. It is posted somewhere on the RPI
site.
Clark


Re: coffee

Tim O'Connor
 

You guys is all lightweight coffee drinkers. Out here in
God's Country we drink Real Coffee. And if there's any of
it left over, then we mix it with gravel, and use it to pave
our roads with!

P.S. The coffee in Colorado stinks too. I think good coffee
must be a coastal thing. The further inland you go, the worse
it gets.

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> -->> NOTE EMAIL CHANGE <<--
Sterling, Massachusetts


Seley Hoppers

Eric Hansmann <ehansmann@...>
 

Someone recently asked about Seley hoppers and who had what. I asked a similar question a few months back. I've pasted below an informative response from David Thompson. Hope this helps.

Eric Hansmann
Morgantown, W. Va.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++
There's no overall article that I know of, so I'll have to cover this myself. First thing we need to do is distinguish between true Seley cars designed by Charles Seley while he was at N&W and the Seley derivatives that were based on those designs.

Seley's first car was a 34-ft, 4-door gondola with Pratt truss sides in 1900, N&W class GG. Coal & Coke had copies built by AC&F in 1905, and drawings for a Buffalo & Susquehanna 40-ft, 6-door derivative are in the 1906 CBD.

Seley then designed two hoppers in 1901: a 50-ton fishbelly car with
Howe truss sides and three sets of full-width flat-bottom doors, N&W classes HG and HJ, and a shorter 40-ton version with two sets of drop doors, N&W classes HH and HK.
N&W HJ:
http://spec.lib.vt.edu/imagebase/norfolksouthern/glass_plates/screen/03GP0206.jpg

The 50-ton car proved to be popular, with confirmed owners including
Deepwater (to Virginian), B&O (class N-11), Coal & Coke, Cumberland &
Pennsylvania, C&O (secondhand from Island Creek Ry.). Southern ordered a steel-end version in the early 1920s, and AB&C received a peaked-steel-end version in 1925-6. Seaboard received clones of the 40-ton car from AC&F in 1905.

A number of roads had composite hoppers that varied from the Seley designs in various ways: ACL had taller 40-ton cars, the B&M cars were longer with lower sides, the D&H cars were longer and lower and had pyramidal hopper bays, Southern rebuilt their early steel hoppers into composites on the Seley pattern.

Some roads had cars that, dimensionally, could be Seley hoppers or derivatives: Clover Leaf, Norfolk Southern, NC&StL, Frisco, and GB&W.

David Thompson

172801 - 172820 of 196904