Date   

Wegmann HO PFE R-40-16 Kits

Andy Carlson
 

Folks,
It seems that some clarification is needed on Terry's
Red Caboose/Wegmann Hybrid reefer kit.

Any reservations from the previous anouncement
(earlier this year) for PFE R-40-16s are cancilled-I
am only selling this run of R-40-16s to those who send
me payment; shipping in the order payment is received.

The offering I posted to these Yahoo lists earlier
this week is the only notification I am giving, as I
have not kept any records from those who have enquired
about these kits in the past.

I am not yet close to selling out, but if payment is
sent in a month from now I can almost certainly assure
you none will be left.

I will return any payments received after selling out.

I can answer questions at < midcentury@... >
, though it is not necessary to contact me if you wish
to get some of these kits.

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: REA Photo's

Len Allman <allmansipe@...>
 

Hello George,
I'm also modeling REA. Would you please post the
picture info you receive to the list and/or me?
Thank you,
Len Allman

--- h81644 <H81644@...> wrote:
Hi Folks,
I am trying to locate pictures of REA Exprees cars,
especially the
underframe that would show all the brake rigging.
Have tried George
Elwood's site, nothing there for what I need. Any
other suggestions?


Thanks,
George Walls


__________________________________
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New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing.
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REA Photo's

h81644 <H81644@...>
 

Hi Folks,
I am trying to locate pictures of REA Exprees cars, especially the
underframe that would show all the brake rigging. Have tried George
Elwood's site, nothing there for what I need. Any other suggestions?


Thanks,
George Walls


Re: Chrysler Trucks

ljack70117@...
 

Do you people have a very good photo of this truck?
I would like to see a photo.

On Monday, December 8, 2003, at 02:07 PM, Ted Culotta wrote:

On Dec 8, 2003, at 11:03 AM, ELDEN GATWOOD wrote:

Shawn;
I think that "Chrysler" is the common name I kept hearing that is also
applied to the unique, snubber-equipped trucks found on the Evans
"Damage-Free" 50 foot boxcars.  I am supposing these are matches to
those
CB&Q cars?

I have also looked at creating one of these and came to the same
conclusion
as you.  It'd take a great deal of skill to do this one right.  The
snubber
would have to be a stand-alone assembly, and the base plates it is
attached
to stand out from the sideframe.

Given the nice match for these cars that Bill Schneider is doing at
Branchline, he may be the obvious choice.  However, not too many cars
used
this truck, so it might be a stretch for someone to invest in it.
Brass or white metal seems like the obvious choice.

Regards,
Ted Culotta
Thank you
Larry Jackman
I don't care who you are fat man. Get that sleigh and reindeer off my
roof.


Re: Chrysler Trucks

thompson@...
 

Shawn Beckert said:
Does anyone make Chrysler trucks in H.O.? The CB&Q 50'
boxcars from P2K require these, and after looking at
photos of some I'd say there's no good way to scratch
build them. Well, maybe you could file out the coil
assembly on a P2K truck and try to install new coils
with a piece of wire as the snubber, but that seems a
lot of work with dubious results.
Shawn, I assume you mean the FR-5 truck. Years ago, I modeled these for a
PFE express conversion of the R-40-10 cars by using a diesel truck snubber,
a detail part from, IIRC, Detail Associates. It's angled out from the
bottom of the sideframe. I didn't try to reproduce the bracket exactly--I
guess it's a "six inch distance" product.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history


Re: Chrysler Trucks

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Dec 8, 2003, at 11:03 AM, ELDEN GATWOOD wrote:

Shawn;
I think that "Chrysler" is the common name I kept hearing that is also
applied to the unique, snubber-equipped trucks found on the Evans
"Damage-Free" 50 foot boxcars.  I am supposing these are matches to
those
CB&Q cars?

I have also looked at creating one of these and came to the same
conclusion
as you.  It'd take a great deal of skill to do this one right.  The
snubber
would have to be a stand-alone assembly, and the base plates it is
attached
to stand out from the sideframe.

Given the nice match for these cars that Bill Schneider is doing at
Branchline, he may be the obvious choice.  However, not too many cars
used
this truck, so it might be a stretch for someone to invest in it.
Brass or white metal seems like the obvious choice.

Regards,
Ted Culotta


Re: Chrysler Trucks

Tim O'Connor
 

Shawn, no one makes Chrysler trucks, but you might be
able to kitbash them using the snubbers from the Walthers
GSC express car truck.

http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/933-1062

Does anyone make Chrysler trucks in H.O.? The CB&Q 50'
boxcars from P2K require these, and after looking at
photos of some I'd say there's no good way to scratch
build them. Well, maybe you could file out the coil
assembly on a P2K truck and try to install new coils
with a piece of wire as the snubber, but that seems a
lot of work with dubious results.


Re: Chrysler Trucks

ELDEN GATWOOD <ELDEN.GATWOOD@...>
 

Shawn;
I think that "Chrysler" is the common name I kept hearing that is also
applied to the unique, snubber-equipped trucks found on the Evans
"Damage-Free" 50 foot boxcars. I am supposing these are matches to those
CB&Q cars?

I have also looked at creating one of these and came to the same conclusion
as you. It'd take a great deal of skill to do this one right. The snubber
would have to be a stand-alone assembly, and the base plates it is attached
to stand out from the sideframe.

Given the nice match for these cars that Bill Schneider is doing at
Branchline, he may be the obvious choice. However, not too many cars used
this truck, so it might be a stretch for someone to invest in it.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: Beckert, Shawn [mailto:shawn.beckert@...]
Sent: Monday, December 08, 2003 10:41 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Chrysler Trucks

List,

Does anyone make Chrysler trucks in H.O.? The CB&Q 50'
boxcars from P2K require these, and after looking at
photos of some I'd say there's no good way to scratch
build them. Well, maybe you could file out the coil
assembly on a P2K truck and try to install new coils
with a piece of wire as the snubber, but that seems a
lot of work with dubious results.

How many railroads besides the Burlington used this truck,
and which of the hobby manufacturers could be persuaded to
produce an H.O. scale version?

Thanks,

Shawn Beckert




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Chrysler Trucks

Shawn Beckert
 

List,

Does anyone make Chrysler trucks in H.O.? The CB&Q 50'
boxcars from P2K require these, and after looking at
photos of some I'd say there's no good way to scratch
build them. Well, maybe you could file out the coil
assembly on a P2K truck and try to install new coils
with a piece of wire as the snubber, but that seems a
lot of work with dubious results.

How many railroads besides the Burlington used this truck,
and which of the hobby manufacturers could be persuaded to
produce an H.O. scale version?

Thanks,

Shawn Beckert


Re: A little off topic but need help

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Victor Baird asked:
...is there a dedicated passenger car group like the STMFC that
would be a good forum for such a question?

I forwarded your post to the Passenger Car List. To subscribe, e-mail
PassengerCarList-subscribe@...


Ben Hom


Re: IC Reefers

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

I am fascinated that apparently some of the IC steel reefers had dark green roofs and, possibly, ends. Again noting that the early Varney paper-sides cars of prewar had oxide roofs and ends, and the post war Athearn steel models had "silver" roofs/black ends, or oxide roofs and ends (all still having yellow sides, green lettering), was the dark green yet another (attractive) variation?

Denny
--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA


Re: Train Movements -& Bananas East vs West

tim gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Andy Sperandeo wrote:

For Pete Boylan,

I'm pretty sure I didn't say or suggest that bananas were ever shipped
to or
from the West Coast in ICRR cars. I was merely pointing out one
instance in
which an ICRR reefer had made it out to Southern California and was
heading
back east again, probably with a load of California produce.
It is quite possible that bananas were shipped to the West Coast from
the Gulf coast right after WW II. There was probably a shortage of
banana boats which were being converted from wartime service back to
peace time accommodations.

Also during WW II, the routing of reefers was controlled by the AAR's
Refrigerator Car Section through so-called "tide" orders. During 1948,
these orders were rescinded, and control was given back to the car
owners.

The effect of these "tide" orders is shown in the table on page 451 of
Thompson et al.'s PACIFIC FREIGHT EXPRESS (Second Edition). The
percentage of perishable & semi-perishable shipments on PFE lines in PFE
cars were over 90% before WW II; during WW II until 1947, that
percentage fell to about 66%; and staring in 1949, the percentage went
up to around 85%.

Tim Gilbert


A little off topic but need help

skunkskunk2001 <fwj@...>
 

In 1892 the Wabash acquired 8 first class coaches, 8 second class
coaches and 8 baggage cars just in time for the Worlds Fair in
Chicago. I need to know the builder and car numbers for a project
I'm working on for the Wabash Railroad Historical Society.

Would this info be in a railway equipment register and if so, does
anyone have one handy for say 1892-1915 so they can provide me with
the information?

Also, is there a dedicated passenger car group like the STMFC that
would be a good forum for such a question? If I can narrow down the
builder, I think I can get some builder photos.

Thanks in advance
Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana


Re: Truck Wheels

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Spen Kellogg inquires-

Have just spent a tedious amount of time painting wheelsets and then
polishing the treads to get the wheels to look correct. What
methods are commonly used and how do you keep it from being a real
chore? Shortcuts, tips, and tricks are all welcome.

____________________________________________

My default standard on all of my freight trucks is to progressively convert to Reboxx .088" wheel sets, something that I have been doing now for at least three years. These wheels have a natural rather dark silvery sheen that makes the treads look just right IMHO. After wheelset change-out, and before refastening the truck back on the car I routinely each time then paint the truck frame, both sides of the wheels and the axle Floquil Rail Brown. I have developed a means of holding the truck by its bolster in my left hand with my thumb and third finger so that I can spin the wheelset to be painted with my second finger, and a particular brush that just "fits". The entire process for one truck takes probably no more than about two minutes, and at the end the truck stands out because of its remaining shiny treads (and the thin .088" wheel treads certainly do help).

This of course does not prevent added aging and weathering, if desired, or the use of other paint colors if the particular model requires it.


--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA


Re: Truck Wheels

Christian Tucker <ctucker1@...>
 

methods are commonly used and how do you keep it from being a real
chore? Shortcuts, tips, and tricks are all welcome.

After a few hundred wheelsets any process is a chore! After the
knife and file work I give mine a through wash followed by a soak in
Polly Scale Plastic Prep. When dry I use a brush and Microscale
Liquid Mask and put a blop of the mask on each axle cone and into
each sideframe hole. (The Microscale Mask washes out of the brush.
Other brands don't.)

I mount the wheelsets on a rack that I cobbled together from styrene
scraps many years ago after I saw a photo in MR of A. Sperandeo's
wheel painting rack. The sideframes are screwed to a part of the
rack. I paint, weather and so forth.

When paint has set, I pull off the mask with tweezers. The wheels go
into the sideframes. I use a stainless steel disk brush in a Dremel
running at a slow speed to whirl the wheels and scrub the treads
clean and shiny. Prepare to loose a few wheelsets/sideframes until
you get the Dremel technique learned!

Christian Tucker
New York


joining the photo list

Earl Myers <emyers5@...>
 

Anybody have an idea as to the simpelest way to do this foe access?
Earl Myers


Re: Train Movements -& Bananas East vs West

Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...>
 

For Pete Boylan,

I'm pretty sure I didn't say or suggest that bananas were ever shipped to or
from the West Coast in ICRR cars. I was merely pointing out one instance in
which an ICRR reefer had made it out to Southern California and was heading
back east again, probably with a load of California produce.

Happy holidays,

Andy

Andy Sperandeo
Executive Editor
MODEL RAILROADER Magazine
262-796-8776, ext. 461
Fax 262-796-1142
asperandeo@...


Re: Digest Number 1603 - re; truck wheels

Phil Clark
 

Spen I guess I do twelve or so at a time, in my minds eye, because I haven't
done any in last few months.

I use a sawn-off length of pressed steel shelf support. The length is same
size as my tool box, about eleven inches. The number is probably twelve like
you get in a bubble pack of 33 inch freight car wheels from Life-Like P2K.
The shelf support has many holes in it. I do one side at a time. I take the
wheels and shelf length and some old news-paper and acrylic paint and brush
paint them whilst talking, like my mums' generation would knit whilst
watching TV. The colour would be two thirds black and one third brown. When
twelve are finished I would use a chemists' eye dropper to drop several
drops of thinned lighter colour paint onto the upper-most wheel side, whilst
still on my painting rack. An hour later it would dry enough to take home.
The next day I would do the other side.

A few days later the wheel-sets would be assembled into a truck. I would
use a spinning wheel in a motor tool to remove some paint to reveal the bare
metal tread. I hold the assembled car lightly in one hand. The spinning
wheel is card or an abrasive cut-off disk. However I might be lazy, the
continuous run test track I use in my attic typically has a freight on the
move, whilst I am up there. The train is an F5A + F5B (Athearn Genesis ACL),
the cars are a mix of AmbroidRed Caboose/Branchline etc, train is DC using
8V/500mA/25 mph/40 cars. Track is undulating, the point is though,
eventually the wheel treads are bare metal after a few hours.

From: Spen Keltal after a few houirlogg <spenkell@...>
Subject: Truck Wheels

Have just spent a tedious amount of time painting wheelsets and then
polishing the treads to get the wheels to look correct. The wheels
should be some sort of rust/grime combination with the treads and
flanges silver. Won't go into my method, which seems very labor
intensive, hard on the hands, and generally very inefficient. There must
be a better way, but my poor decaying gray cells haven't a clue. What
methods are commonly used and how do you keep it from being a real
chore? Shortcuts, tips, and tricks are all welcome.

Regards, Spen Kellogg


Re: Truck Wheels

Ron Boham <spnut@...>
 

Spen,

I use substantially the same method. One step I include is to polish the manufacturer's coating/finish off the treads before painting, so when I polish again afterwards, all I have to knock off is a little dried paint. I found I was handling them so much using a Dremel on controlled slow speed to clean off both paint and factory finish, some needed touch-up.

I have a pine 1x2 with eighteen inches of track held down with push pins, and a small cardboard box with eight slots in the lid. After the initial polishing step, I put eight wheelsets into the box slots and paint wheel faces. After a couple hours, I move those to the track and put eight more in the slots, painting wheel faces on the second set and axles and wheel backs on the first. If you were going to do 200 wheelsets, I suppose it could be tedious, but I do mine while doing other projects at the bench. All my assembled trucks and ready-to-use wheelsets are painted and ready to install. The old Kadee truck cards, with the plastic box glued to a cardstock back, are ideal for this, or, I will use the packaging they came in and hang them on the pegboard.

New kits cause me to do research to see if they were furnished with the proper trucks, and, if so, if I want to use them. This way, I never get into the position of having a car built with nothing to put under it.

Ron Boham
Ralston, NE

Spen Kellogg wrote:

Have just spent a tedious amount of time painting wheelsets and then
polishing the treads to get the wheels to look correct. The wheels
should be some sort of rust/grime combination with the treads and
flanges silver. Won't go into my method, which seems very labor
intensive, hard on the hands, and generally very inefficient. There must
be a better way, but my poor decaying gray cells haven't a clue. What
methods are commonly used and how do you keep it from being a real
chore? Shortcuts, tips, and tricks are all welcome.


Truck Wheels

Spen Kellogg <spenkell@...>
 

Have just spent a tedious amount of time painting wheelsets and then polishing the treads to get the wheels to look correct. The wheels should be some sort of rust/grime combination with the treads and flanges silver. Won't go into my method, which seems very labor intensive, hard on the hands, and generally very inefficient. There must be a better way, but my poor decaying gray cells haven't a clue. What methods are commonly used and how do you keep it from being a real chore? Shortcuts, tips, and tricks are all welcome.

Regards, Spen Kellogg

167161 - 167180 of 193458