Date   

Dave Lambert contact info

Bill Welch <bwelch@...>
 

Does anyone on this list have contact info for Dave Lambert? The number I
had for him in North Carolina, 704.864.8612 rings but no one answers and
there is no machine. I don't know if it is his number or what.

I would like to have a mailing address.

Bill Welch


Timonium report

Bill Welch <bwelch@...>
 

I attended the show at Timonium yesterday, mainly to visit Bob's Photo to
look for diesel and steam photos of my favorite y'all roads. He did however
have 100 new freight car photos from the private collection he has been
printing in phases. I purchased several. He will be a the NMRA National for
the train show.

F&C had one new kit, the Seaboard's phosphate covered hopper, and the N&W's
HC-1, the clone of the PRR two bay LO.

BTW, Branchline over a year ago announced a limited run of their ACF reefer
in the GB&W's late 40's/early 50's paint scheme, their #9009. I asked
Central Hobby Supply to order me one immediately but they have never gotten
it and follow-up contact with BL have been futile. I have seen these showing
up at a few dealers at Timonium however and picked one yesterday also. They
have improved their lettering printing somewhat, but there was black paint
dribbled on the roof and the kit board area under the doors is not painted.

On the subject of the BL reefer, is all I have to do to make the sides fit
is open up the index holes on the body box sides?

Bill Welch


Re: pourable lead binder/glue

Don Valentine
 

Quoting benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@worldnet.att.net>:

Don Valentine wrote:
And cheaper at your local gun shop.

That's true, but I'm having trouble finding #10 or #12 lead shot at
the local gun shop. (#8 is much less satisfactory for this
application.) Any ideas for another source?

Other than another gun shop I can't come up with any, Ben. It does
appear that shot finer than 7 1/2 or 8 is more difficult to find as it
is so fine it is not used that much for shotshells.

Don Valentine


Re: Branchline reefer sides, was Timonium report

Rob Adams
 

Bill;

I have not found that enlarging the holes is sufficient to provide for proper fit of the sides. I've built several of the BL reefers and have resorted to clipping off the location pegs on the sides and then reducing the thickness of the sides slightly by sanding (I glue or tape a sheet of 150 grit sandpaper to a wood block). One must work slowly to avoid thinning them too much, and frequently test fit the sides for proper fit. Minor adjustment of the corners may be required. I also remove any paint from the carbody side so that solvent cements will work effectively.

I've found this re-work produces excellent fitting sides. In my opinion, the Branchline reefer is fun to assemble and produces a gorgeous model (especially when augmented with some easy upgrades like wire grabs, cut levers, retainer, etc.). It is unfortunate that the problem of the side fit has not been addressed, as it probably puts off some of our less determined colleagues.

Kind regards, Rob Adams


Bill Welch wrote:


On the subject of the BL reefer, is all I have to do to make the sides fit
is open up the index holes on the body box sides?

Bill Welch


Re: Dave Lambert contact info

Dennis Rockwell <dennis@...>
 

On 21 Jun, "Bill Welch" wrote:

Does anyone on this list have contact info for Dave Lambert? The number I
had for him in North Carolina, 704.864.8612 rings but no one answers and
there is no machine. I don't know if it is his number or what.

I would like to have a mailing address.
For that number, Google returns:

Phonebook results for 704-864-8612
M Hart, (704) 864-8612, 2418 Hoffman St, Gastonia, NC 28054

Looks like he may have moved, or maybe the phone just isn't
in his name.

For David Lambert NC (to narrow it down), Google gets:

Phonebook results for David Lambert NC

David Lambert, (919) 929-6962, 109 Gardner Cir, Chapel Hill, NC 27516
David Lambert, (910) 628-8925, 4803 E Raynham Rd, Fairmont, NC 28340

From another return, I think the one in Chapel Hill may be a
dentist (DDS). There is also an automobile race result that
mentions a driver named David Lambert from Kannapolis NC.

Searching for "Dave Lambert" returns nothing promising.

Google can be scary sometimes...

Good luck!

Dennis


Re: Gun flats and naval guns was PRR F22/F23

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Don Valentine wrote:
I believe the Wisconsin is at Portsmouth, VA "awaiting final
disposition".

WISCONSIN is actually at the Nauticus National Maritime Center in
Norfolk. Still under the management of the Navy, she is open to the
public for tours.
http://www.nauticus.org/wisconsin.html


Ben Hom


Re: pourable lead binder/glue

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Don Valentine wrote:
And cheaper at your local gun shop.

That's true, but I'm having trouble finding #10 or #12 lead shot at
the local gun shop. (#8 is much less satisfactory for this
application.) Any ideas for another source?


Ben Hom


Re: pourable lead binder/glue

Don Valentine
 

Quoting benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@worldnet.att.net>:

Andy Miller asked:
What is "pourable lead"?

It's A-Line #13015 (6 oz @$4.50) and is actually .08 inch lead shot.
http://www.ppw-aline.com/weights.htm

And cheaper at your local gun shop.

Don Valentine


Re: pourable lead binder/glue

ljack70117@...
 

He gets $4.50 for 6 ozs. If you can find some one like Non-Ferrous Metals with recovered shotgun shot you will pay less than a dollar a pound.
I do not know what lead shot sell for in a gun store.
Thank you
Larry Jackman

On Monday, June 21, 2004, at 09:34 AM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:

Andy Miller asked:
What is "pourable lead"?

It's A-Line #13015 (6 oz @$4.50) and is actually .08 inch lead shot.
http://www.ppw-aline.com/weights.htm


Ben Hom


Re: pourable lead binder/glue

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Andy Miller asked:
What is "pourable lead"?

It's A-Line #13015 (6 oz @$4.50) and is actually .08 inch lead shot.
http://www.ppw-aline.com/weights.htm


Ben Hom


Re: Gun flats and naval guns was PRR F22/F23

Don Valentine
 

Quoting Brian Paul Ehni <behni@comcast.net>:

One of the links I found about Hunter�s Point indicated the gantry
could
handle 360 tons max, and could do so with control enough to crack an
egg
shell, but not break the yolk.

Thus the turrets must have been assembled in place one heavy piece
at a time.

Don Valentine


Re: Gun flats and naval guns was PRR F22/F23

Don Valentine
 

Quoting Brian Chapman <cornbeltroute@aol.com>:

the biggest landmark at Hunters Point is a monster gantry that was
specifically built (and then modified) to lift either battleship 16"
gun turrets, or the guns alone (I cannot recall). <
The approximately 38-foot diameter Iowa Class 16/50 turrets weighed
the equivalent of a WWII destroyer, 2700 tons IIRC. What's that, 5.4
million pounds? Can a gantry handle this kind of weight?

And, could not the rifles be removed without lifting the entire
turret?
As I understand it the armored cover was removed to replace individual
inard parts and assemblies.


BTW, the Iowa and Wisconsin remain in reserve status; Missouri (Pearl
Harbor) and New Jersey (I don't recall where) are museum ships.

The New Jersey is at Camden, N.J., about a mile up river, and on the
opposite side of the Philadelhia Navy Yard where she was built. My wife,
youngest daughter and I visited her in December. Very impressive!

I believe the Wisconsin is at Portsmouth, VA "awaiting final disposition".

Don Valentine


Re: Books about WW II RR's in the US

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Brian Chapman asked:



World War II rail traffic must be an intriguing subject of itself,
regardless of the port activities. Keeping a two-coast system fluid
must have been a major chore. Are there any captivating histories
about the U.S. rail system during the War, anyone know?
About the most complete one volume history of WW II railroads I know of would be Joseph Rose's AMERICAN WARTIME TRANSPORTATION (Crowell Press, NY, 1953). No photos though. There are a couple of listings for this book at http://www.bookfinder.com/

More literary with some photos would be Kip Farrington's RAILROADS AT WAR (New York, 1944). Some war time material was also provided in his RAILROADING FROM THE HEAD END (1943) and RAILROADING FROM THE REAR END (1946).

Tim Gilbert


Re: pourable lead binder/glue

steamgene@...
 

In a message dated 6/21/04 12:57:44 PM, freestatesystems1@comcast.net writes:


McMaster-Carr has lead shot for about $15 / lb.  They are at
http://www.mcmaster.com/ .  I have found them to have excellent
service.  Page 3359 of their online catalog has many other options for
lead weights at reasonable prices.  This is an industrial catalog but
they deal with hobbyists very well.  Tool prices often beat other
vendors.
I just got a reply from a gun collector friend. Number 8 shot is used for
shooting skeet and should be available at Wal-Mart and any shop that sells
reloading supplies. There is also 8.5 and 9 shot and something he refers to as
"dust."
All of this is cheaper in quantity than through a hobby supply. The same is
true of the stick on weights. I buy mine at a car parts store. Much
cheaper.



Gene Moser


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: pourable lead binder/glue

ljack70117@...
 

Pour-able lead is shotgun shot. I used to get it in Seattle at Non Ferrous Metals. The Kenmore gun club would rake their Shotgun range and pick up the shot and sell to them.
Thank you
Larry Jackman

On Monday, June 21, 2004, at 08:44 AM, Andy Miller wrote:

Dean,

What is "pour-able Lead"?
When attaching sheet lead, I use Elmer's "Stix-all". It is an acetic acid
based glue and comes in a tube. Since it is not solvent based, it does not
attack any known plastic. It is very slow setting (20-30 min to skin over).
That is frequently a big advantage. It will bond anything! Its big
downside is that it can not be painted. Its worse than actetal plastics!
So use it only where it won't show.


Regards,

Andy Miller


Re: Gun flats and naval guns was PRR F22/F23

Brian Paul Ehni <behni@...>
 

One of the links I found about Hunter¹s Point indicated the gantry could
handle 360 tons max, and could do so with control enough to crack an egg
shell, but not break the yolk.
--
Brian Ehni



From: Brian Chapman <cornbeltroute@aol.com>
Reply-To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jun 2004 12:49:40 -0000
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Gun flats and naval guns was PRR F22/F23

the biggest landmark at Hunters Point is a monster gantry that was
specifically built (and then modified) to lift either battleship 16"
gun turrets, or the guns alone (I cannot recall). <

The approximately 38-foot diameter Iowa Class 16/50 turrets weighed
the equivalent of a WWII destroyer, 2700 tons IIRC. What's that, 5.4
million pounds? Can a gantry handle this kind of weight?

And, could not the rifles be removed without lifting the entire
turret?

BTW, the Iowa and Wisconsin remain in reserve status; Missouri (Pearl
Harbor) and New Jersey (I don't recall where) are museum ships. Iowa
is now 20 miles or so north of San Francisco anchored with fleet
reserve ships in an inland bay. A plan avidly supported by San
Francisco groups and government officials intends to dock Iowa in San
Francisco, where it would serve as a museum ship and also serve as a
local disaster emergency center (read: earthquake).

Historic Ships Memorial at Pacific Square:
www.battleshipiowa.org/

Turret No. 2 is inoperable and remains sealed, as I understand it.
The cost of repair is high.

World War II rail traffic must be an intriguing subject of itself,
regardless of the port activities. Keeping a two-coast system fluid
must have been a major chore. Are there any captivating histories
about the U.S. rail system during the War, anyone know?

-Brian Chapman
Cedar Rapids, Iowa


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Re: Gun flats and naval guns was PRR F22/F23

Brian Chapman <cornbeltroute@...>
 

the biggest landmark at Hunters Point is a monster gantry that was
specifically built (and then modified) to lift either battleship 16"
gun turrets, or the guns alone (I cannot recall). <

The approximately 38-foot diameter Iowa Class 16/50 turrets weighed
the equivalent of a WWII destroyer, 2700 tons IIRC. What's that, 5.4
million pounds? Can a gantry handle this kind of weight?

And, could not the rifles be removed without lifting the entire
turret?

BTW, the Iowa and Wisconsin remain in reserve status; Missouri (Pearl
Harbor) and New Jersey (I don't recall where) are museum ships. Iowa
is now 20 miles or so north of San Francisco anchored with fleet
reserve ships in an inland bay. A plan avidly supported by San
Francisco groups and government officials intends to dock Iowa in San
Francisco, where it would serve as a museum ship and also serve as a
local disaster emergency center (read: earthquake).

Historic Ships Memorial at Pacific Square:
www.battleshipiowa.org/

Turret No. 2 is inoperable and remains sealed, as I understand it.
The cost of repair is high.

World War II rail traffic must be an intriguing subject of itself,
regardless of the port activities. Keeping a two-coast system fluid
must have been a major chore. Are there any captivating histories
about the U.S. rail system during the War, anyone know?

-Brian Chapman
Cedar Rapids, Iowa


---


Re: pourable lead binder/glue

Andy Miller <asmiller@...>
 

Dean,

What is "pourable Lead"?
When attaching sheet lead, I use Elmer's "Stix-all". It is an acetic acid
based glue and comes in a tube. Since it is not solvent based, it does not
attack any known plastic. It is very slow setting (20-30 min to skin over).
That is frequently a big advantage. It will bond anything! Its big
downside is that it can not be painted. Its worse than actetal plastics!
So use it only where it won't show.


Regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
From: Dean Payne [mailto:deanpayne@att.net]
Sent: Friday, June 18, 2004 9:54 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] pourable lead binder/glue


I bought some pourable lead to use in my Funaro O&W wood hopper, but
found that I assembled my Westerfield Fowler box with either no
weight or not enough, so I will use it for that as well. What do you
use for binder/glue? Epoxy seems too thick, Goo is too... goey, and
Elmers... that won't stick to just paint, will it? I could use
Testors model cement (the thick, honey-like stuff that I used when I
was growing up).
I can't tear apart the body of the box car, it is already painted
(not decaled). Sometimes, I find I can split along a roof seam or
something, but this resin roof is built-up, with interior braces.
I'm sure I'd break the resin before getting a clean break at a seam.
I'll try to hide the weight under the trucks.
Dean Payne






Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Gun flats and naval guns was PRR F22/F23

steamgene@...
 

In a message dated 6/21/04 9:17:51 AM, cornbeltroute@aol.com writes:


World War II rail traffic must be an intriguing subject of itself,
regardless of the port activities. Keeping a two-coast system fluid
must have been a major chore. Are there any captivating histories
about the U.S. rail system during the War, anyone know?
One of the amazing things I learned about troop movement -- most by rail --
during World War II, was the seemingly random movements from base to base. As
an example, a division would be mobilized at Camp Robinson, Arkansas and at
some point move to Camp Pickett, Virginia, then to Camp Drum, New York, then to
Camp Carson, Colorado, only to be shipped out from Camp Patrick Henry,
Virginia. BTW, all of the above, except for Patrick Henry, were division level
training camps. Whether this was just the movement of the troops and individual
equipment or with the entire division's equipment, I don't know. But this
doesn't take into consideration movement to places like Camp Livingston,
Louisiana for Corps level maneuvers.
But it does seem that major units spent more time in travel than they
actually needed, doing a fine job of clogging up rails and wearing down locomotives
and rolling stock.



Gene Moser


personal

Al & Patricia Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

Will Walter M. Clark contact me off list? - Al Westerfield

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