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Re: C&NW Mather Stock Cars

Richard Hendrickson
 

Richard Hendrickson said:
I'm pretty sure that the Mather cars never got green and yellow paint
-
especially since maintenance on those cars wasn't carried out by the
C&NW but by Mather's Chicago Ridge shops, where you could get a car
painted
any color as long as it was mineral red.
The Mather stock cars leased to SP in the early 1960s were black.
Are you saying that Mather wasn't the painter?
In fact, Mather wasn't the painter of those cars; it was North American Car
Co., which bought out Mather in the late 1950s. Other NAC-owned stock cars
were painted black, as well, but not during the Mather era.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Yahoo! Groups Links




Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Re: Armored Trains

Jim Gillmore <TwoRail@...>
 

An question from Jon Cagle 06/22/2004 asked:


Where would one go to find plans or information regarding armoured
trains and locomotives of the WWII era. A friend has an interest in
building an armoured train, no he isn't a model railroader an armour
modeler. But it's a start.


I have already responded to him off-list, but for anyone else who is
interested, check out www.GallopingPictures.com (military section)
for a boxed set of 3 VHS videos entitled "War Trains". It covers from
the Civil War thru the Vietnam War.

Jim Gillmore.


another thing I like about Westerfield cars

ed_mines
 

Another thing I like about Westerfield cars in that many have little
dimples as starter holes.

Many of the Sunshine kits don't have this and the modeler is expected
to drill the hole beneath the gizmo that attaches the grab iron to
the car. I'm not too good at this and sometimes I've drilled enough
off center that I have to bend another grab iron to fit between 2
holes.

The drilling jig that Tichy provides with some of their kits is
idiotic. How many cars have you seen where these grabs are a real
mess?

Unless you use a drill press the holes all end up drilled on an angle
made worse by the thickess of the jig. Try putting a piece of masking
tape on the car and marking where the holes should be drilled with a
pencil. A drafting triangle can make sure the rungs are straight.

Ed


Tony Thompson's technical credentials/ lead metal/car weights

ed_mines
 

Someone poked some fun at Tony Thompson's remarks about lead.

Tony has a solid technical background; he's an engineer of some sort.
Every time he's made a technical comment that I knew something about
it was right on the money.

I have a techncial background too, master of engineering in chemical
engineering.

As to the dangers of lead, tooth paste and many ointments used to
come in lead tubes.

On to car weights. I appreciate the fact that Westerfield includes
weights in many of his kits. Al, how much do they cost when you buy a
whole lot of them? Could it be a resale item?

I've found that mend plates sold in the hardware store are pretty
good for weighing freight cars. Once I squeezed one to fit in to a
Sunshine MDT reefer and the car ended up weighing too much. I also
bought a metal bar about an 1/8 inch thick, 1 inch wide and 3 feet
long from a True Value hardware store. It's easy enough to cut with a
hack saw.

I've used BBs for weighing some cars. Once I bought an AHM 3 bay
covered hopper at a train show which was weighted with sand.

Ed


Re: C&NW Mather Stock Cars

Charlie Vlk
 

Richard...
The CB&Q Mather stock cars were Chinese Red as were the kitbashed double
door cars (the NYC cars were green?) ...but they both might be after Mather
sold out to North American so you are still technically correct....
Charlie Vlk


. OTOH, Mather stock

cars
were never painted any color but mineral red, to the best of my
knowledge.


Re: California lead shot

Charlie Vlk
 

Tony-
Even though you live in Berkley you seem to have a realistic sensible
approach to warnings about toxic materials....
But just think of all the pure drinking water and pregnant women across the
world that have been saved from the nasty lead content in the brass within
Kato locomotive flywheels or the die cast underframes of Model Die Casting
(Athearn) freight cars thanks to the progressive advocates in the State of
California who have made legislation that rules all of us regardless where
we live!
Personally, I feel if someone grinds up enough Model Railroad equipment to
release the nasties and ingests the residue they ought to be whistled out of
the gene pool.....
Charlie Vlk


Re: Timken Roller Bearing boxcars

Joel Norman <mec-bml@...>
 

didnt athearn offer that as a set(box car--gon--etcplus a caboose and
engine????}

----- Original Message -----
From: <newrail@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 23, 2004 7:56 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Timken Roller Bearing boxcars


Quoting Earl Myers <emyers5@...>:

Gents;
A friend and RR fan that works at Timken locally (Canton) asked me
about the Timken boxcars with the split orange/silver color
schemes....were those schemes correct and for what era??

I'm taking a bit of a stab here, Earl, but if it is way off base
someone
will undoubtably catch it [probably me for making an error! (-:]. You say
"boxcars". How many were actually painted as you describe? I suspect it
was
one or two and unlikely to have been more than ten. But I believe the
scheme
is basically correct, at least from the advertising prints I've seen, and
dates to 1947, perhaps 1948.

Hope this is of some help to at least get things started for you.

Don Valentine




Yahoo! Groups Links






Re: Armoured Trains

Bob Webber <rswebber@...>
 

At 07:37 AM 6/23/2004, you wrote:
Gene Moser wrote:
"I believe that almost all of the armored trains of WWII belonged to
either the Germans or the Russians."

Almost all. See a Canadian example in "Fortress on Steel Wheels," by
Charles Purdon, Trains, September 1988, p 30. (courtesy
http://index.mrmag.com)
Not at all - the Czechs, the Japanese, Poles, Italians, British, Turks, and others all had armored trains - not to mention Americans on both side of the civil war, and Mexicans, and others. Depends on eras, locales, and definitions - and uses.


Re: Timken Roller Bearing boxcars

Don Valentine
 

Quoting Earl Myers <emyers5@...>:

Gents;
A friend and RR fan that works at Timken locally (Canton) asked me
about the Timken boxcars with the split orange/silver color
schemes....were those schemes correct and for what era??

I'm taking a bit of a stab here, Earl, but if it is way off base someone
will undoubtably catch it [probably me for making an error! (-:]. You say
"boxcars". How many were actually painted as you describe? I suspect it was
one or two and unlikely to have been more than ten. But I believe the scheme
is basically correct, at least from the advertising prints I've seen, and
dates to 1947, perhaps 1948.

Hope this is of some help to at least get things started for you.

Don Valentine


Re: Armoured Trains

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Gene Moser wrote:
"I believe that almost all of the armored trains of WWII belonged to
either the Germans or the Russians."

Almost all. See a Canadian example in "Fortress on Steel Wheels," by
Charles Purdon, Trains, September 1988, p 30. (courtesy
http://index.mrmag.com)

Additionally, Squadron stocks some very reasonably priced books
($8.97 - $13.47) on German and Soviet armored trains:

http://www.squadron.com/ItemDetails.asp?item=SH0198
http://www.squadron.com/ItemDetails.asp?item=SH0288
http://www.squadron.com/ItemDetails.asp?item=SH1783
http://www.squadron.com/ItemDetails.asp?item=OS2083
http://www.squadron.com/ItemDetails.asp?item=SH0917

Additionally, at least two 1/72 craftsman kits are available:
http://www.squadron.com/ItemDetails.asp?item=MCA2002
http://www.squadron.com/ItemDetails.asp?item=PDMV028


Ben Hom


Re: Naperville

Garth Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Shawn,

I received my letter from Martin yesterday, with my name on the schedule to a do Sacramento Northern presentation for the third year in a row. (Sigh!) I will just be returning from England, and will not attend.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Beckert, Shawn wrote:

Fellow Listers,

Has anyone heard when Martin might be sending out the
flyer for this year's Naperville, or what he might have
scheduled for entertainment?

Thanks,

Shawn Beckert



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Re: lead shot

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Let's go easy on all this lead business. It is
TOXIC. Eats your brain. Sure you can wash your
hands after you've been working with it, but
that's not sufficient. It's absorbed through the
skin, it emits vapors from being handled, and if
you melt it, as some have suggested for
lost-plaster casting, it's vapors are absorbed
directly through your lungs. Lead dust from
filing and cutting it gets into your body via
lungs, mouth, and skin. And it doesn't go away.
Once it, it ain't coming out.
This is mostly hogwash. Lead's vapor pressure, even in the liquid state, is remarkably small and lead vapor is most certainly NOT a danger. It does NOT emit vapor as a solid. Lead compounds can in some cases be absorbed by the skin, but metallic lead is not dangerous in that way. The one real danger in this list is lead dust from filing, which is dangerous to ingest. I fully support warnings about dangerous aspects of modeling, but this one "ain't coming out" correctly.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: lead shot

Schuyler Larrabee
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Ned Carey [mailto:nedcarey@...]
Sent: Tuesday, June 22, 2004 1:02 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re:lead shot

get plain sheet lead flashing . . .
Roll out a bit and cut off what you need.
Whets the best way to cut lead sheet. I wanted
to replace the
slope sheet weights on some hoppers with lead
sheet. I found
it difficult to cut to any specific shape
accurately.

Hey, Gize!
Let's go easy on all this lead business. It is
TOXIC. Eats your brain. Sure you can wash your
hands after you've been working with it, but
that's not sufficient. It's absorbed through the
skin, it emits vapors from being handled, and if
you melt it, as some have suggested for
lost-plaster casting, it's vapors are absorbed
directly through your lungs. Lead dust from
filing and cutting it gets into your body via
lungs, mouth, and skin. And it doesn't go away.
Once it, it ain't coming out.

Making slope sheets from sheet lead isn't really
worth it, gains about 0.5 oz. (I know, I have done
it.) Much better to buy the already-cast weights
available on the market. I know about weights
available from REBOXX (yep, I know them
personally, but financial benefit to me? Not a
chance!) and I know there is at least one other
supplier out there with a large range of shapes
and sizes.

Ned, if you really wanna get that lead cut to the
right shape, the most effective way to cut it is
with a knife. But I certainly don't do that any
more.

SGL


Re: flats and naval guns was PRR F22/F23

Tim O'Connor
 

Denny,

You realize that the gun cradles on the flat cars have to
be able to rotate so the cars don't derail on curves?

I imagine a 1:24 artillery piece would provide a nice tapered
barrel to simulate an HO battleship gun barrel.

Speaking of gun flats and guns, does anyone know of model sources for
gun barrels or rifles suitable for these short flats?

Denny
--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


Re: lead shot

Schuyler Larrabee
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Steven Holding
[mailto:s.holding@...]

Works great for casting a
weight for between the bays of a hopper car.
Steve
REBOXX sells these in several diffferent styles
for the more popular models.

SGL


Re: Branchline GB&W ACF Reefer

buchwaldfam <buchwaldfam@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Andy Carlson <midcentury@s...> wrote:
Hello Richard,
They are no longer
available from BL...
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

Now come on guys! First you tell me that my red CB&Q box car is not
authentic. Now you tell me that the GBW reefer is no longer avialable
AFTER I cut the ends off of the one i got to kit bash into something
else! What's next? Ted's new book is going to show me how far off the
mark I ended up with my 'bashed '32 ARA Clinchfield box car!
Sheesh! :)

PS: Please hold one of the 32 ARA box books for me!

Regards,
Phil


Timken Roller Bearing boxcars

Earl Myers <emyers5@...>
 

Gents;
A friend and RR fan that works at Timken locally (Canton) asked me about the Timken boxcars with the split orange/silver color schemes....were those schemes correct and for what era??
Earl Myers


Re: PRR gun flatcars movement

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Earl Myers asks:


"Anybody have an idea what route these 16"rifles woulda taken heading to Nevada or California from back east??"

Well...we at least know that the one in the photo I referenced was on Santa Fe tracks in Kansas and was headed to Fontana, CA. Sounds like Cajon Pass on the Santa Fe to me.
Mike Brock


PRR gun flatcars movement

Earl Myers <emyers5@...>
 

Gents;
Anybody have an idea what route these 16"rifles woulda taken heading to Nevada or California from back east??
Earl Myers


Re: U.S. - Canada interchange in the mid '20s

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Don Valentine wrote:

And if you go back another decade or so the B & M even had freight
cars
jointly lettered with the Canadian Pacific for use in international
service.
I suspect some of this may have been to better compete with similar
programs
of the Grand Trunk working with the Central Vermont. By W.W. I is
seems to
have passed though the traffic was just as strong.
I responded:

Don,

IIRC, these jointly B&M-CP lettered cars were reserved for LCL &
Merchandise Car Service, and not for carload lots.
Don Valentine asked:

What evidence is there to support this, Tim? Based upon the number of
cars,
normal B&M and CPR practice I a not convinced.


My source is Diagram #7 of the 1900-1907 B&M FREIGHT CAR LETTERING BOOK plus some references in the listing of boxcars in the January 1905 ORER.

Tim Gilbert

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