Date   

Re: Walthers 50-foot Express Reefer

Joel Norman <mec-bml@...>
 

STMFC Group: Can someone who is 100% a B&M/MEC{cira 1948-1950}HO scale
modeler please e mail me off line at mec-bml@charter.net not a big joiner
but would like to exchange e mail and modeling data of the BM-MEC.....thanks
Joel Norman
Eastern Maine Rly

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ed Hawkins" <hawk0621@sbcglobal.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, July 18, 2004 1:45 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Walthers 50-foot Express Reefer



On Sunday, July 18, 2004, at 07:45 AM, Don Strack wrote:

Can anyone comment on the accuracy of the Walthers 50-foot express
reefer?
Which paint scheme is accurate for the as-built cars?

If anyone has one of these Walthers cars, could they measure the
wheelbase
on the trucks for me. I'm looking for a GSC express-type truck with a
5 feet
6 inches wheelbase for use on UP cabooses, with and without outside
swing
hangers.
Don,
The Walthers web site states the models are due in November 2004.

A quick summary: As built during the late 1920s-1930 the cars were
assigned to American Refrigerator Express (ARE) or painted for lease to
numerous railroads. Approximately 17 railroads that leased the cars had
them painted with their names stenciled along the top side fascia and
with their own reporting marks. The cars were operated this way through
the 1930s and into the '40s with some going into to the 1950s (Seaboard
until the late 1950s). During the 1940s most railroads returned the
cars to General American as they decided to exit the express
refrigerator business in favor of turning it over to the Railway
Express Agency. In turn, these cars were turned over for lease to REA
and assigned to REX 272-499 and 1200-1899. The REX cars were found
throughout the 1940s-1950s and well into the 1960s. Data from the ORERs
show that the early 1950s was a peak of cars in service under REX
reporting marks. URTX also operated the cars in various quantities
during the 1940s and '50s. Hope this helps.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins





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Re: Walthers 50-foot Express Reefer

Ed Hawkins
 

On Sunday, July 18, 2004, at 01:56 PM, pullmanboss wrote:

The plan as of 4 weeks ago is to sneak the express reefer to market
after the first three Branchline Pullmans are released and before
the second three. The 8-1-2 has already shipped, and the 10-1-2 and
12-1 are ready to go. I think the schedule calls for 4 to 6 weeks
between Pullman releases.
Tom,
This is certainly good news. Thanks for the update.
Ed Hawkins


Sunshine Models weathering

Ian Wilson
 

Hi folks:

I'm in the process of weathering several freight cars, and my mind
keeps going back to the several wonderful examples of weathered cars
I saw in the Sunshine Models display room at Naperville last. An
example of the kind of quality I'm trying to achieve is the NKP
rebuild shown in this page on Ted's steam era freight cars site:

http://www.steamfreightcars.com/modeling/new%
20products/sunshine/rebuildsmain.html

Does anyone know what weathering techniques are used on Sunshine
pilot models? For example the NKP boxcar?

Thanks kindly,

Ian Wilson
Orillia, Ontario


Re: Order for GN composite cars and B&M underframes

Thomas Baker
 

Earl,

Apologies for not getting back to you. I have been very busy with summer school and a five-day workshop in Las Vegas. No, I didn't go there to gamble or to womanize! I am interested in the following:

1. GN composite car 003

2. GN composite car 007

3. Four B&M underframes

4. One pair of the odd so-called Reverse Creco doors which were not Creco at all

5. Two pair of 5/5/5 ends for two outside-braced box cars

Tom


Re: Walthers 50-foot Express Reefer

Don Valentine
 

Quoting Ed Hawkins <hawk0621@sbcglobal.net>:


On Sunday, July 18, 2004, at 11:04 AM, Brian J Carlson wrote:

Ed, and Don, you guys are referring to two different models. The model
in the catalog is for Express reefers built in 1957, and owned/leased
by REA, ACL, GN, and I think SF.
Brian and Don,
Sorry if I confused the question. The Walthers express reefers of an
all steel car represents riveted-side cars built by GATC in 1955 and
1957 for REX only. Any other schemes put on this car are bogus. The ACL

had welded side cars built by AC&F circa 1947-48 (as well as REX).
These are reportedly coming from Branchline Trains after all their
Pullman cars are released. Regarding the trucks on the 1950s GATC cars,

I haven't studied their use to the extent that I could offer any useful

information about them on other applications.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins

I don't know who has confused the issue, Ed. Perhaps I did. I "thought"
Brian was refering to the new wood sheathed General American express reefer
that is scheduled for November release from Walthers and is patterned after
the type you had the major piece on in RPC #7 IIRC. That is the car I was
refering to.

Don Valentine


Re: Walthers 50-foot Express Reefer

Ed Hawkins
 

On Sunday, July 18, 2004, at 11:04 AM, Brian J Carlson wrote:

Ed, and Don, you guys are referring to two different models. The model in the catalog is for Express reefers built in 1957, and owned/leased by REA, ACL, GN, and I think SF.
Brian and Don,
Sorry if I confused the question. The Walthers express reefers of an all steel car represents riveted-side cars built by GATC in 1955 and 1957 for REX only. Any other schemes put on this car are bogus. The ACL had welded side cars built by AC&F circa 1947-48 (as well as REX). These are reportedly coming from Branchline Trains after all their Pullman cars are released. Regarding the trucks on the 1950s GATC cars, I haven't studied their use to the extent that I could offer any useful information about them on other applications.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Walthers 50-foot Express Reefer

pullmanboss <tgmadden@...>
 

Ed Hawkins:
The ACL
had welded side cars built by AC&F circa 1947-48 (as well as REX).
These are reportedly coming from Branchline Trains after all their
Pullman cars are released.
The plan as of 4 weeks ago is to sneak the express reefer to market
after the first three Branchline Pullmans are released and before
the second three. The 8-1-2 has already shipped, and the 10-1-2 and
12-1 are ready to go. I think the schedule calls for 4 to 6 weeks
between Pullman releases.

Tom Madden


Re: Hazardous Material Placards

Richard Hendrickson
 

I attended a NMRA clinic last week on proper car placement in trains
when the question came up, "When did railroads start applying
hazardous material placards?" No one knew the answer, but does
anyone in the group know? I'm particularly interested in those tank
car kits that come with diamond-shaped placards and holders,
operating on a 1948-era model railroad.
The use of hazardous materials placards dates back at least to the WWI era,
and they were certainly required ca. 1948. Some years ago Microscale
produced a comprehensive and accurate set of decals for '40s through '70s
placards, set #87-975 which is still cataloged. It includes placards for
corrosives, explosives, etc. as well as the more common inflammable
placards for tank cars, and is the only place I know to get the "half
placards" (with one half blacked out) which were used on empty tank cars
that still contained hazardous vapors.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Re: Walthers 50-foot Express Reefer

Ed Hawkins
 

On Sunday, July 18, 2004, at 07:45 AM, Don Strack wrote:

Can anyone comment on the accuracy of the Walthers 50-foot express reefer?
Which paint scheme is accurate for the as-built cars?

If anyone has one of these Walthers cars, could they measure the wheelbase
on the trucks for me. I'm looking for a GSC express-type truck with a 5 feet
6 inches wheelbase for use on UP cabooses, with and without outside swing
hangers.
Don,
The Walthers web site states the models are due in November 2004.

A quick summary: As built during the late 1920s-1930 the cars were assigned to American Refrigerator Express (ARE) or painted for lease to numerous railroads. Approximately 17 railroads that leased the cars had them painted with their names stenciled along the top side fascia and with their own reporting marks. The cars were operated this way through the 1930s and into the '40s with some going into to the 1950s (Seaboard until the late 1950s). During the 1940s most railroads returned the cars to General American as they decided to exit the express refrigerator business in favor of turning it over to the Railway Express Agency. In turn, these cars were turned over for lease to REA and assigned to REX 272-499 and 1200-1899. The REX cars were found throughout the 1940s-1950s and well into the 1960s. Data from the ORERs show that the early 1950s was a peak of cars in service under REX reporting marks. URTX also operated the cars in various quantities during the 1940s and '50s. Hope this helps.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Walthers 50-foot Express Reefer

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

Ed, and Don, you guys are referring to two different models. The model in the catalog is for Express reefers built in 1957, and owned/leased by REA, ACL, GN, and I think SF.

As for Don's original question, the trucks have a 6' wheelbase

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: Lost parts (Was Truss Rods)

ljack70117@...
 

When a small part goes to the floor do not use your eyes to look for it. Take your hand and start dragging it slowly over the floor until you have covered the whole area. I have never had to cover the whole area as I find it some where before.
On Sunday, July 18, 2004, at 01:26 PM, Doug Brown wrote:

I have done just that on occasion, successfully. They don't land in the
same place but then I know what to look for. Setting a piece on the
floor works better and you never loose that piece too. Most often when I
look for a dropped piece, I may not find that piece, instead finding
pieces I couldn't find previously.
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net
definition of a will
A dead give away


Re: Lost parts (Was Truss Rods)

Doug Brown <brown194@...>
 

I have done just that on occasion, successfully. They don't land in the
same place but then I know what to look for. Setting a piece on the
floor works better and you never loose that piece too. Most often when I
look for a dropped piece, I may not find that piece, instead finding
pieces I couldn't find previously.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jacque Burgess [mailto:jacque@yosemitevalleyrr.com]
Sent: Friday, July 16, 2004 8:21 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Lost parts (Was Truss Rods)

Now, everyone come clean.....how many of you (I have <g>) thought about
dropping an identical part after a fruitless search on hands and knees
looking for a lost part. It just seems logical that, if you drop another
identical part and watch it drop, that both pieces will come to rest
next to
each other......<g>

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Re: Walthers 50-foot Express Reefer

Don Valentine
 

Quoting Don Strack <donstrack@comcast.net>:

Can anyone comment on the accuracy of the Walthers 50-foot express
reefer?
Which paint scheme is accurate for the as-built cars?

If anyone has one of these Walthers cars, could they measure the
wheelbase
on the trucks for me. I'm looking for a GSC express-type truck with a 5
feet
6 inches wheelbase for use on UP cabooses, with and without outside
swing
hangers.

Don Strack

Some of us have been aware of these cars for three to four months but
they will not be available for retail sale until very late fall acording to
the information received from Walthers this week. I expect, however, that
the truck wheelbadse will be longer than what you seek.

Don Valentine


Re: Walthers 50-foot Express Reefer

Don Strack <donstrack@...>
 

Ed Hawkins wrote:

The Walthers web site states the models are due in November 2004.
Silly me. I was going by page 109 of the Walthers 2004 catalog.

Actually, I was looking for the car that matched the truck sold separately
on page 266, using the details of the car itself visible in the truck photo.
I found it on page 109. The other photos on page 109 sure look like they
might work for an inside swing hanger 5' 6" UP caboose truck, although they
do look to be a bit long in the wheelbase.

On page 109, they say that the prototype for the express reefer was first
ordered in 1957.

Thanks Ed. I guess I'll simply have to wait...or find my caboose trucks
elsewhere.

I just got some of the new Trix UP CA-3 cabooses, with proper raised roof
panels. Just trying to get away from the wood beam trucks, which the
prototype lost in 1954-1956. Nice models, wrong (too early) trucks. The roof
panels are done better that the earlier model from Centralia, as are the end
hand rails. I can fix the lack of center sill real easy, and here's a chance
to use either Accurail Proto scale couplers and draft gears, or Kadee #78s.
Life is good.

Don Strack


Walthers 50-foot Express Reefer

Don Strack <donstrack@...>
 

Can anyone comment on the accuracy of the Walthers 50-foot express reefer?
Which paint scheme is accurate for the as-built cars?

If anyone has one of these Walthers cars, could they measure the wheelbase
on the trucks for me. I'm looking for a GSC express-type truck with a 5 feet
6 inches wheelbase for use on UP cabooses, with and without outside swing
hangers.

Don Strack


Re: Lost parts (Was Truss Rods)

WBa2485811@...
 

Sorry:

But thi is old age seeting in .

Bill


Re: Red Caboose Kits

Don Valentine
 

More likely it means we may soon expect to pay more for the privilege of
assembling a Red Caboose kit than we would pay for a ready-to-run one with
little or no effect upon the accuracy, or lack therof, of the lettering.

Don Valentine


Quoting armand premo <armprem@surfglobal.net>:

Does this mean that we can now expect accurate models with
correct
lettering?Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
From: "blair kooistra" <wallcloud@mindspring.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, July 17, 2004 4:05 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Red Caboose Kits


Frank Brua wrote:
"I just recived a new dealer newsletter from Red Caboose with the
following information which I am passing on as a public service
announcement:

"Continuing to supply small number of HO kits to modelers leaves us
no alternative but to raise the price of kits by approximately 30%.
Some kits coming in the near future will see small increases but by
mid-September all decorated kits will be priced at approximately
$24.95."

I can't say as I blame em. I mean, the cost of adding metal weights
to
their
GS gondola kits became so overwhelming they decided to not include
the
thickness- and width-specific weights with the kits--rather than raise
the
rates $.75 per car on a $17.00 kit--because a) it took too much time
to
tape
the weight into the bottom of the box the kit came in; and 2) the
woman
who
did the taping was complaining of Carpal Tunnel syndome symptoms, and
management decided that rather than deal with the medical condition,
it
was
easier to just eliminate the activity that was causing her the
problem. At
least that's what Red Caboose told me. And then they sold me the
weights
separately for far more than it cost them to add 'em to the kit.

So, now, how much cheaper will unassembled kits cost than assembled
kits?
Or
will we also see the assembled kits increase by 30% as well in the
near
future?

--blair kooistra
fort worth tx





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Re: BMX 800-series cylindrical hoppers

Joel Norman <mec-bml@...>
 

Can Don Valentine please e mail me off line at
mec-bml@charter.net
have a few questions about the SLATEPICKER and the DH branch from Castleton
Vt to EagleBridge NY cira 1950
JoelNorman

----- Original Message -----
From: <newrail@sover.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>; "mksparks2" <mksparks2@aol.com>
Sent: Saturday, July 17, 2004 2:30 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] BMX 800-series cylindrical hoppers


Quoting mksparks2 <mksparks2@aol.com>:

snip

According to Chuck Yungkurth, the Barrett Co. "had a fleet of over 90
of these special purpose tank cars". As I mentioned previously, the
July 1950 ORER lists only 30 cars at that time. I would be
interested in learning when the other 60-odd tank-hoppers were put
into service. Unfortunately, I don't have ready access to any ORERs
published after July 1950 or I'd find this answer out for myself -
help anyone? My suspicion is that the conversions were done in a
fairly short period of time (i.e., a year or two), but perhaps not.
If Barretts was doing things on the cheap (which converting 30 year-
old tank cars instead of buying some of the new covered hoppers which
I believe were just coming onto the market might suggest), then it is
possible that the coversions took a bit longer. Purely conjecture on
my part.

Speaking of "special service", I've read several descriptions of the
commodity transported in these cars. This has ranged from granules
utilized with roofing tar to granules used in the manufacture of tar
roofing (which I read as tar shingle roofing material). Perhaps both
are true. Anyone have any idea what type of material these "granules"
were? I recall a posting on one of the RR groups not too long ago
that mentioned that crushed slate was utilized in conjunction with
paint as a non-skid surfacing application. That posting brought to
mind a slate crushing operation featured in the NEB&W Green Dot
Press' reprint of "The D&H 1931 Industry Sampler" (available through
the Rensselear Model Railroad Society). According to the Industry
Sampler, in 1914 the Staso Milling Company built a large plant at
Poultney, VT "for the manufacture of crushed slate, which is used for
prepared roofing and numerous other purposes." In 1931 this plant
was shipping 150,000 tons of crushed slate annually - I assume most
of it by the D&H. I don't have any idea how long Staso was in
operation at this location or whether Barrett's cars were utilized
for this traffic, but this is a thought provoking coincidence.

Hi Mike,

What would you bet they carried granulated slate off the D&H's
Slatepicker??
It's a great way to use up the tailings for shipment to Bird & Son in East
Walpole, Mass. for one.

Don Valentine





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Re: Truss Rods

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Surely by now we are nearing exhaustion of this topic???

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Hazardous Material Placards

Larry Fink
 

I attended a NMRA clinic last week on proper car placement in trains
when the question came up, "When did railroads start applying
hazardous material placards?" No one knew the answer, but does
anyone in the group know? I'm particularly interested in those tank
car kits that come with diamond-shaped placards and holders,
operating on a 1948-era model railroad.

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