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Re: Athearn's new John Deere Tractors.

Earl Tuson
 

Model "B" this is a Row-crop type in production from 1947 - 1952.
Actually, the B was first produced (unstyled) in 1935, and received the new sheet metal in 1939. It was produced until 1952 like Edwin states. As one of the highest production tractors of this period, this is a <very> good candidate for a flat car load. For a list of production quantities, see:

http://www.antiquetractors.com/Research/prodnum.htm

Earl Tuson


Re: Deere loads

Earl Tuson
 

Tim asked,

Is that a standard gauge flat car on narrow gauge trucks?
PBL's website says the narrow gauge 6500 series flat cars were rebuilt from standard gauge 28000 series gondolas.

Earl Tuson


Re: Deere loads

Bob Webber <rswebber@...>
 

I should, however point out that the blocking and tie down for the load is still in keeping with that of SG flats, and the method and load is consistent with SG flats of an era five years or so previous to the photo.

At 10:43 PM 9/25/2004, Bob Webber wrote:
It is a converted SG flat car on NG trucks. And, as such, still pulled by steam power at this date.
(11/62) There had been an article in making one in O scale from an Atlas flat, taking out a scale foot...can't recall where though at this remove - at least 20 years back.

At 01:04 AM 9/26/2004, you wrote:

Nice shot. Is that a standard gauge flat car on narrow gauge trucks?

At 04:24 PM 9/25/2004, you wrote:
I have loaded a low res photo of a typical load of Deere tractors here:
http://www.drgw.org/rsw/DRGW6540.jpg

I believe people will be able to access this particular portion without
problems, but if problems develop, perhaps the group-meister alternate can
move it into the photo section - I could not as I got an error when I
attempted it.


Re: Deere loads

Bob Webber <rswebber@...>
 

It is a converted SG flat car on NG trucks. And, as such, still pulled by steam power at this date.
(11/62) There had been an article in making one in O scale from an Atlas flat, taking out a scale foot...can't recall where though at this remove - at least 20 years back.

At 01:04 AM 9/26/2004, you wrote:

Nice shot. Is that a standard gauge flat car on narrow gauge trucks?

At 04:24 PM 9/25/2004, you wrote:
I have loaded a low res photo of a typical load of Deere tractors here:
http://www.drgw.org/rsw/DRGW6540.jpg

I believe people will be able to access this particular portion without
problems, but if problems develop, perhaps the group-meister alternate can
move it into the photo section - I could not as I got an error when I
attempted it.


Re: Athearn's new John Deere Tractors

Earl Tuson
 

the GP dating to the early '30s IIRC
I have the GP as produced 1928-1935...

and the D back as far as 1923 or 24 and later depending
on the diameter of the spoked flywheel.
and the unstyled D as 1924-1938 (while the styled D continued in production until 1953!)

The Model 60 would be early to mid 1950's.��For a new, in
transit load,1954-56 would probably be safe.
1952-1956

�although I think the "A" was still in production in '52.
Yes, 1952 was the last year for JD A's.

A great source for this information and more is www.ytmag.com. Goto the brand you are trying to research and click on serial numbers. That will show exactly what years each model was produced. Elsewhere on the web, you can find production quantities, which might give you a better idea what tractors would be more commonly seen and which were more rare (only about 30,000 JD GP tractors were built, compared to over 10 times that number each of JD A and B tractors.) Lastly, understanding how and what various models were used for can help one select an appropriate tractor for a load. For example, the JD D was called a "Wheatland" tractor, and as such was seldomly sold in, say, New England or the South. Tractor sales often had a regional aspect to them, particularly the smaller manufacturers.

Earl Tuson


Re: Photo CD

Brian Paul Ehni <behni@...>
 

I can't make it; any chance of getting one by mail?
--
Brian Ehni

From: Clark Propst <cepropst@netconx.net>
Reply-To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Sep 2004 21:52:35 -0500
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Photo CD

With Naperville only a month away I thought I'd ask if there would be any
interest again in the CDs of the freight car snap shots Sidney Wheeler took? I
would be happy to bring some along again, price is still $10.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa







Yahoo! Groups Links





Photo CD

Clark Propst <cepropst@...>
 

With Naperville only a month away I thought I'd ask if there would be any interest again in the CDs of the freight car snap shots Sidney Wheeler took? I would be happy to bring some along again, price is still $10.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Deere loads

Bob Webber <rswebber@...>
 

Sorry, should have included it - Nov. 1962. And, that is still steam era for this car.

At 08:31 PM 9/25/2004, you wrote:
Bob,

Do you have a date for the photo?

Bob Webber <rswebber@concentric.net> wrote:
I have loaded a low res photo of a typical load of Deere tractors here:
http://www.drgw.org/rsw/DRGW6540.jpg

I believe people will be able to access this particular portion without
problems, but if problems develop, perhaps the group-meister alternate can
move it into the photo section - I could not as I got an error when I
attempted it.



George Hollwedel
Prototype N Scale Models
georgeloop@austin.rr.com
310 Loma Verde Street
Buda, TX 78610-9785
512-796-6883
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Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: Deere loads

George Hollwedel <georgeloop1338@...>
 

Bob,

Do you have a date for the photo?

Bob Webber <rswebber@concentric.net> wrote:
I have loaded a low res photo of a typical load of Deere tractors here:
http://www.drgw.org/rsw/DRGW6540.jpg

I believe people will be able to access this particular portion without
problems, but if problems develop, perhaps the group-meister alternate can
move it into the photo section - I could not as I got an error when I
attempted it.



George Hollwedel
Prototype N Scale Models
georgeloop@austin.rr.com
310 Loma Verde Street
Buda, TX 78610-9785
512-796-6883
__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com


Re: John Deere Tracto models.

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

The John Deere tractor models that I would be looking for in the '40's would be the far more ubiquitous Models A and(especially) B. These two models covered the midwest, and there was scarcely a "Green" farm that did not have one or the other. The Model D (not a row-crop tractor) was pretty scarce by then, generally saved for heavy duty stationary work such as powering threshing machines, or heavy duty plowing on very large fields.

The lugged wheels were becoming pretty obsolete by the forties due to state and local laws banning them from paved roads.

Of the three tractors, I would guess that the Model 60 would be about the only one that one might have reasonably been seen as rail-borne new-deliveries during the predominant area of interest generally expressed by this group (i.e. c. 1935-55).

Other writers are correct about John Deere and its licensing. Right out of the box, Deere has been relentless in controlling and then licensing the use of its brand name. It is not cheap, the conditions must be steep, and the money to be made high when one sees Athearn grovel and cheapen itself by lettering and painting just about every product that it has with JD green and lettering.

This latter is more evidence of the headlong rush by significant parts of the hobby into the new HO Toy Train market.

Denny

Denny
--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, California


Re: Consumer Prototype Protection

armprem
 

A goodly portion of model railroaders trust the manufacturers.Any paint
scheme is considered authentic.It takes some consumer education before they
start looking beyond the box and its contents.I am sure most of us were not
as sophisticated nor critical when we started in the hobby.I strongly
suspect that a more discerning hobbyist has led to more prototypically
accurate offerings.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene Green" <lgreen@elp.rr.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, September 25, 2004 7:05 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Consumer Prototype Protection


The thing that amazes me about this discussion is that I often hear
manufacturers say "Most customers don't care" or words to that effect.

For God's sake, manufacturers, listen to what you just said. If most
customers don't care (about extra information concerning the
prototype) then they don't care. Get it? They don't care so it
won't hurt sales.

On the other hand, if I can't identify that a product (1) matches its
prototype, (2) is correctly lettered and (3) is appropriate for 1950
or earlier, I don't buy it. If I can't find the information and the
manufacturer doesn't provide it, I don't buy. And I know I'm not the
only one with that attitude.

I can name two products from two different manufacturers for which I
provided the prototype data. Folks, it ain't that hard. And it at
least one instance it boosted the heck out of sales. More than
double the expected sales were realized.

Gene Green





Yahoo! Groups Links





Re: Consumer Prototype Protection

Dave Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

I think this is a good time to add a thanks to Branchline for adding useful
information (e.g., dates) on their boxes. It isn't Sunshine or Westerfield
caliber, but it's darn useful.

Dave Nelson

-----Original Message-----
From: Anthony Thompson [mailto:thompson@signaturepress.com]

I don't think customers expect, nor are likely to get, a Lofton or
Westerfield information sheet in a Branchline kit (just to choose one
example).....


Deere loads

Bob Webber <rswebber@...>
 

I have loaded a low res photo of a typical load of Deere tractors here:
http://www.drgw.org/rsw/DRGW6540.jpg

I believe people will be able to access this particular portion without problems, but if problems develop, perhaps the group-meister alternate can move it into the photo section - I could not as I got an error when I attempted it.


NYC hoppers

VgnRy43@...
 

Would anyone be able to answer a hoper car question for me? I model the
coalfields served by VGN, C&O, N&W and NYC in August 1954. My question is; would
the red 50 ton NYC coal hoppers be correct for this time period?

Aubrey Wiley
Lynchburg, Va.


Re: Consumer Prototype Protection

Bob Kutella
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@s...> wrote:

You are of course free to infer what you want, Jeff. But that's
not
what I meant to say.
Of course you did not. But since so many comments on this thread
refer to cost control and economies, let's look at the market and what
it says. It seems to me modelers are willing to pay premium prices on
kits form Westerfield and Sunshine, which kits are sometimes so
specialized in detail and era, that they would never support a mass
market. Yet over and over I hear, and have myself experienced the
well documented kits. If nothing else it gives me a warm fuzzy
feeling that the finished product will be an accurate replica.

More firewwod - Micro Trains (often) supplies one side of their jewel
box liner with enough car history that you also get the idea they did
their homework. In this case, the well over 100 body styles cannot
support 100% accurate models, but I think people know that and do not
expect more for 15-20 bucks. Yet the paint schemes and colors, style
of lettering, and placement do reflect a prototype. That little
insert lets us know it, and was in each car box before they started
giving some history. So how much did that cost??
A reputable manufacturer will do at least a basic research job, yet
many modelers do not have the access to research material, have the
skills to ferret it out, and many can ill afford to spend valuable
model building time researching info that has already been done.
Somewhere there is another (unspoken) dynamic here since the cost
differential of a slip of paper cannot be the ruling factor.

Bob Kutella


C&O cars vol 1, where's volume 2

Curt Fortenberry <arrphoto@...>
 

Has anyone heard any more news about continuing the volumes on C&O
cars. Volume 1 was the hoppers and gons. Vol 2 & 3 were implied, but
I've not seen any word that it's going to happen.

Curt Fortenberry


Re: Consumer Prototype Protection

Gene Green <lgreen@...>
 

The thing that amazes me about this discussion is that I often hear
manufacturers say "Most customers don't care" or words to that effect.

For God's sake, manufacturers, listen to what you just said. If most
customers don't care (about extra information concerning the
prototype) then they don't care. Get it? They don't care so it
won't hurt sales.

On the other hand, if I can't identify that a product (1) matches its
prototype, (2) is correctly lettered and (3) is appropriate for 1950
or earlier, I don't buy it. If I can't find the information and the
manufacturer doesn't provide it, I don't buy. And I know I'm not the
only one with that attitude.

I can name two products from two different manufacturers for which I
provided the prototype data. Folks, it ain't that hard. And it at
least one instance it boosted the heck out of sales. More than
double the expected sales were realized.

Gene Green


Re: Consumer Prototype Protection

Paul Hillman
 

It is actually safe to say, that ANY type of prototype which was built in the past, is still in existence today.

That is to say that, if a 1936 "farm tractor", for example, was once built in that era, and was used then in it's "heyday", then yet they still exist in the front of farmer's homes and in museums and displays. I see it all the time.

Therefore I do not see how dating a model would be detrimental to the consumer, or adverse to their wanting to purchase it. I actually think it would enhance purchasing.

All "dating" would do is define for everyone the date of it's origin and supply "period modellers" with that basic info, and refer "others" to the concept of that, "Yeah! My 'Grandad' used to have a tractor like that! I want to put one in my 1950, or even 1999, railroad scene."

What would "label printing costs" be?; an extra 1/1000 cents/per?

Paul Hillman


Athearn's new John Deere Tractors.

Edwin C Kirstatter <q1xamacarthur@...>
 

My hobby dealer informs me that he can no longer get Athearn models
through Walthers of Milwaukee. Those John Deere tractors are about the
only item that I would want to buy. I was really dissatisfied with those
USRA
2-8-2's they imported a few years ago. If their freight car models catch
up with Intermountain or Red Caboose and L-L Proto 2000 I may go back
and take another look!

Edwin C. Kirstatter, B&O Modeler.

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Re: Consumer Prototype Protection

eabracher@...
 

In a message dated 9/25/04 4:05:52 PM, lgreen@elp.rr.com writes:



I can name two products from two different manufacturers for which I
provided the prototype data.  Folks, it ain't that hard.  And it at
least one instance it boosted the heck out of sales.  More than
double the expected sales were realized.

Rio Grande Models, since 1970, has been putting prototype info on the
instruction sheet for almost all of their kits. The only time it was not there is
when either the kit was more or less generic or info was not available.

A short history of the period the model would be appropriate for and colors
it was painted as well as lettering.

Most modelers appreciate this small bit of information and one of the
questions most asked is what period of time did woud it be approprate for.

eric

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