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Re: F&C PS-0 ten rib end kit

Tim O'Connor
 

I never thought I'd see the day that I would have a resin kit
without a prototype. Thank you both for the info.
Regards, Ted Culotta
Ted, talking to people at Naperville I have come to realize that
MANY resin kits have no prototype, depending on what features you
are interested in. Many Sunshine kits have incorrect doors, ends,
underframes, and even car widths. If you want a lesson in this it
pays to visit Byron Rose's workshop and look at his couple dozen
corrected resin models. They are unpainted so you can see all of
the changes he's made -- to both Sunshines and Westerfields.

I think Stan sells both styles of Pullman end as separate parts,
so you can at least salvage your kit...

Tim O.


Re: F&C PS-0 ten rib end kit

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Nov 21, 2004, at 9:23 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:

Ted, I thought NKP was the exception to the kit. The UP and CGW
cars clearly had square corner ends.

>I was building this kit and was going to decorate it for the NKP. 
>However, the photo that I have of one of the NKP cars built in 1940
>shows that they had round corner ends with W-section corner posts. 
The
>F&C kit has square corner posts.  Does anyone know if the PM or WLE
>cars built in 1940 with 10 rib ends has square or W-section corner
>posts on the ends?  I am beginning to think that the kit may not
have a
>prototype, which is a rarity for resin.
Yes, all of the cars built in 1938 had square cornered ends. The 1938
cars only had nine corrugations in the ends, excluding them as
prospects for the ten corrugation end kit (the CGW and UP are
reproduced by the nine rib end kit). What I was asking is whether the
ten corrugation end cars built in 1940, specifically the PM and WLE,
had square or round corner ends. It appears based upon Brian Carlson's
info that the WLE has also had round corner ends, making it unlikely
that the PM would have had square corner ends. I never thought I'd see
the day that I would have a resin kit without a prototype. Thank you
both for the info.

Regards,
Ted Culotta


Re: Quad hopper ID

Montford Switzer <ZOE@...>
 

Tony, David and list:

Curiosity got the best of me Saturday when I was passing through
Noblesville, IN so I took a good look at the car in question -- in the
rain. It is definitely a steel car complete with a coat of red primer
followed by aluminum paint.

The one located at the stone quarry between Monon and Francesville, IN,
with the bogus MONON lettering may or may not be of steel construction.
That one bares closer inspection.

Mont Switzer

David Thompson wrote:
If the car is actually from Alcoa, it might be one of the 15 steel
clamshell quad hoppers built as counterparts to the ten aluminum
quads,
all by Canton in late 1931. The end construction of the car in
question
could determine if it is one of those 15, or simply an H21 or H25
clone
or something else.
Excellent point, David, and the car would be nearly as
interesting in that case as if it were aluminum.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: More old photos

Roger Miener <Roger.Miener@...>
 

Charles Etheredge says ...

Richard, how about my all-time favorite, the Staggerwing!
Oh dear Charles, that one? The Staggerwing Beechcraft? Yes, it is a
STMFC era airplane. And, it is indeed an awesome airplane, but it is
also one that leaks oil into the drip pan like there is no tomorrow!

In other words, the Beechcraft Staggerwing leaks oil profusely!

Cessna produced (Cessna 195) a very nice piece of work about the same
time. It did not leak oil quite so bad.

Whatever -- In either event - the Staggerwing and the Cessna 195 - ,
in each case the sound is round (the soothing rumble of a radial
engine) - something that Richard Hendrickson's little rag wing tail
dragger can't do.

However, sound or no - it (Richard's tail dragger) sure is fun to fly.
Rogue River Country.

Richard lives in Ashland, Oregon. Ashland, Oregon - well, I tell you
what. It is a really neat place for an airport and a nice place to
hanger a rag wing tail dragger.

Roger Miener
(who is not as young as Richard Hendrickson would suggest)
at Tacoma Wa

PS Richard, how about the Howard DGA (Damn Good Airplane), otherwise
known as the aluminum overcast. Ever see one of them? Howard in
airplanes was like Overland Models in model railroad circles. In each
case, there were not very many of them built.


Re: F&C PS-0 ten rib end kit

Brian Carlson
 

I forgot to say that since the PM, NKP, and WLE all were members of the Advisory Mechanical Committee they probably had the same ends.

Also the notes in the article I have says both the NKP and WLE cars had Equipco hand brakes.

Brian Carlson

Brian Carlson <prrk41361@...> wrote:

Ted, looking at the two pictures I have, I think I agree with Tim, they look like W-corners. The two pictures I have are NKP 20616 (former WLE) taken in 1956 in San Diego, and WLE 26016 in 1944 (Photo is not dated, but last reweighed on 11-1943.)

FYI in April of 1959 started to convert these to TOFC cars.

Brian Carlson

Tim O'Connor wrote:

Ted, I thought NKP was the exception to the kit. The UP and CGW
cars clearly had square corner ends.


I was building this kit and was going to decorate it for the NKP.
However, the photo that I have of one of the NKP cars built in 1940
shows that they had round corner ends with W-section corner posts. The
F&C kit has square corner posts. Does anyone know if the PM or WLE
cars built in 1940 with 10 rib ends has square or W-section corner
posts on the ends? I am beginning to think that the kit may not have a
prototype, which is a rarity for resin.

Regards,
Ted Culotta


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Re: F&C PS-0 ten rib end kit

Brian Carlson
 

Ted, looking at the two pictures I have, I think I agree with Tim, they look like W-corners. The two pictures I have are NKP 20616 (former WLE) taken in 1956 in San Diego, and WLE 26016 in 1944 (Photo is not dated, but last reweighed on 11-1943.)

FYI in April of 1959 started to convert these to TOFC cars.

Brian Carlson

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Ted, I thought NKP was the exception to the kit. The UP and CGW
cars clearly had square corner ends.


I was building this kit and was going to decorate it for the NKP.
However, the photo that I have of one of the NKP cars built in 1940
shows that they had round corner ends with W-section corner posts. The
F&C kit has square corner posts. Does anyone know if the PM or WLE
cars built in 1940 with 10 rib ends has square or W-section corner
posts on the ends? I am beginning to think that the kit may not have a
prototype, which is a rarity for resin.

Regards,
Ted Culotta


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U.S./Canada


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Re: F&C PS-0 ten rib end kit

Tim O'Connor
 

Ted, I thought NKP was the exception to the kit. The UP and CGW
cars clearly had square corner ends.

I was building this kit and was going to decorate it for the NKP.
However, the photo that I have of one of the NKP cars built in 1940
shows that they had round corner ends with W-section corner posts. The
F&C kit has square corner posts. Does anyone know if the PM or WLE
cars built in 1940 with 10 rib ends has square or W-section corner
posts on the ends? I am beginning to think that the kit may not have a
prototype, which is a rarity for resin.

Regards,
Ted Culotta


F&C PS-0 ten rib end kit

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

I was building this kit and was going to decorate it for the NKP. However, the photo that I have of one of the NKP cars built in 1940 shows that they had round corner ends with W-section corner posts. The F&C kit has square corner posts. Does anyone know if the PM or WLE cars built in 1940 with 10 rib ends has square or W-section corner posts on the ends? I am beginning to think that the kit may not have a prototype, which is a rarity for resin.

Regards,
Ted Culotta


Re: More old photos

Tim O'Connor
 

One thing that I do see - if you use the links Tim sent, you get the
panoramic views on one page - which is nice, but one some of the views it
ruins the effect and the detail.
?????

Bob, it sounds like you need to get a real web browser... Mine can zoom
in or out on any photo image with a simple click on the picture.


Re: More old photos

armprem
 

Coal was sometimes delivered in canvas bags for small orders.Are we looking
at some of those bags rather than chunks of coal?Armand Premo;

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jeff Lodge" <cvfanbratt@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sunday, November 21, 2004 9:09 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] More old photos



Tim forwarded some links of interest from the Utah site. My question about
the coal dealer (in the link below) - What customer would want a load of
coal the size of the stuff in the truck directly in front of the building?

Being that big, I can't see that it would burn cleanly. Would the coal be
any cheaper in such a large grade to make it cost effective for a client to
have a crusher?

Obviously this is of direct interest to those of us who will be shipping
coal in our scale empires......

Thanks,
Jeff Lodge
Brattleboro, VT

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
Citizen's Coal Company... (before)
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/4415182862002_144412286200239
222000702816.jpg


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Re: More old photos

Brian Paul Ehni <behni@...>
 

Well, it means we can use O scale coal! 8^)
--

Brian Ehni

From: Jeff Lodge <cvfanbratt@...>
Reply-To: <STMFC@...>
Date: Sun, 21 Nov 2004 18:09:32 -0800 (PST)
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] More old photos


Tim forwarded some links of interest from the Utah site. My question about
the coal dealer (in the link below) - What customer would want a load of coal
the size of the stuff in the truck directly in front of the building?

Being that big, I can't see that it would burn cleanly. Would the coal be any
cheaper in such a large grade to make it cost effective for a client to have a
crusher?

Obviously this is of direct interest to those of us who will be shipping coal
in our scale empires......

Thanks,
Jeff Lodge
Brattleboro, VT

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
Citizen's Coal Company... (before)
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/4415182862002_14441228620023922
2000702816.jpg


Re: More old photos

Bob Webber <zephyr1@...>
 

I'm not sure, but I would think that it might go to a smaller dealer or to a large customer that does have means to crush it. Note in the piles in
the yard, there is more of that grade too. Heck, you put one of those
lumps of coal in some stoves and you have heat for one night easy!

One thing that I do see - if you use the links Tim sent, you get the
panoramic views on one page - which is nice, but one some of the views it
ruins the effect and the detail. Particularly of the Apex and Bingham
scenes, where having to scroll back and forth to trace the routes is half
the fun.

I have seen one model of a open pit, and after looking at the two examples,
I can see there being, in some cases, more operation in these mines and
complexes than on some layouts. And the nice thing is, there is no need to
excuse the use of multi-level tracks!

At 08:09 PM 11/21/2004, you wrote:

Tim forwarded some links of interest from the Utah site. My question
about the coal dealer (in the link below) - What customer would want a
load of coal the size of the stuff in the truck directly in front of the
building?

Being that big, I can't see that it would burn cleanly. Would the coal be
any cheaper in such a large grade to make it cost effective for a client
to have a crusher?

Obviously this is of direct interest to those of us who will be shipping
coal in our scale empires......

Thanks,
Jeff Lodge
Brattleboro, VT

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
Citizen's Coal Company... (before)
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/4415182862002_144412286200239222000702816.jpg


---------------------------------
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Meet the all-new My Yahoo! ­ Try it today!







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Re: More old photos

Charles Etheredge
 

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson
<rhendrickson@o...> wrote:

If I weren't afraid of incurring Mike's wrath for being totally
off-topic,
I'd post a photo to give y'all a real identification
challenge...maybe a
Myers OTW or a Zlin 526.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520

Richard, how about my all-time favorite, the Staggerwing!


Re: More old photos

Jeff Lodge <cvfanbratt@...>
 

Tim forwarded some links of interest from the Utah site. My question about the coal dealer (in the link below) - What customer would want a load of coal the size of the stuff in the truck directly in front of the building?

Being that big, I can't see that it would burn cleanly. Would the coal be any cheaper in such a large grade to make it cost effective for a client to have a crusher?

Obviously this is of direct interest to those of us who will be shipping coal in our scale empires......

Thanks,
Jeff Lodge
Brattleboro, VT

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
Citizen's Coal Company... (before)
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/4415182862002_144412286200239222000702816.jpg


---------------------------------
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Meet the all-new My Yahoo! Try it today!

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Early Walthers 8 raised panel 2 bay hopper.

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

I recently purchased a near-perfect assembled Walthers 34' HO hopper in its original box. This was produced c. 1937-39, and was made of thin lead castings mounted on wood blocks. the castings are neatly soldered together. The slope sheets seem to be made of Strathmore. It has 8 raised panels,and a vertical brake staff.

Does anyone have any idea as what the prototype might have been?

Denny
--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, California


Re: More old photos

raildata@...
 

The coal is clearly "mine run", or not crushed and graded. I saw bituminous
coal like this dumped in front of people's houses in southern Ohio in the 60s.
Just takes a couple of whacks with and axe or hammper to break it up.

Anthracite is something much more difficult when it comes to breaking lumps.

Chuck Yungkurth
Boulder CO, but raised in Smokestack America


Re: tank car question

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Aubrey Wiley wrote:
Would anyone be able to steer me to information on when, why, where
and who handrail enclosed platforms were used/started on certain
tankers? I appreciate your time.
Aubrey, as Ed Kaminski points out in his book on AC&F tank cars, the buyer specified what they wanted on the cars they purchased. So the simple answer is, the owner chose platforms or no platforms. The more complex answer is that owners did so if they were concerned about safety and convenience of workers loading and unloading cars. As those operations were more complex with dangerous or otherwise troublesome cargoes, cars to carry such loads were more likely to have platforms.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Tim's excellent Salt Lake City oil refinery photo

Richard Hendrickson
 

Chris Barkan writes:

This is a great photo for the tank-car-o-philes among us. It would be an
excellent candidate for Ted's photo of the month club, particularly if we
could
get Richard H. and others to try and ID the cars. Reporting marks are not
visible but perhaps builder, type and approximate year of construction?
Richard,
do you want to give it a shot, at least for the first track in the center
foreground?
Of the cars that are clear enough in the photo to identify, all are Union
Tank Line - no surprise, considering that UTL's fleet dominated the tank
car business at the time the photo was taken, the Standard Oil monopoly
having only recently been broken up. The smaller cars were 6.5K gal. class
X, most of the larger ones were early class X-3, and in the foreground
there was one 10K gal. four course AC&F Type 21, a design that UTL
purchased in the '20s, in addition to ordering large numbers of X-3s built
to their own design.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Re: More old photos

Spen Kellogg <spenkell@...>
 

Brian Paul Ehni wrote:

However, looking up the tail number indicates it's a C-54, but flying for
"Northeast".

And C-54s had OVAL windows: http://www.warbirdalley.com/c54.htm
Which were known in civilian life as DC-4s.

Regards, Spen Kellogg


Re: More old photos

Richard Hendrickson
 

Tim O'Connor's

I don't think it's a DC-3... so what is it?
http://content.lib.utah.edu/USHS_Shipler/image/88058152382002_39222000700570.jpg

unleashed a torrent of speculation from underage listmembers who were
presumably in diapers at the time. It's a Douglas DC-4, guys. Sheesh!

If I weren't afraid of incurring Mike's wrath for being totally off-topic,
I'd post a photo to give y'all a real identification challenge...maybe a
Myers OTW or a Zlin 526.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520

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