Date   

Re: Pickle car??

C J Wyatt
 

<<
I was just leafing through "Dixie Lines: The L&N Railroad"
and on page 53 there's an amazing freight car -- what appears
to be a flat car with 4 wooden vats on its deck, each one
tapered slightly towards the top. The date is 1969 and the
location is the Florida panhandle. Any clues here?

Tim O.>>

Tim,

I'd like to know more myself. From a little earlier era, my 1/45 ORER shows
a W & W Pickle & Canning Company in Montgomery, AL with four TW tank cars,
reporting marks, WWPX. My 2/1/52 GM&O Directory of Industry shows W&W
located on the WRRA at Montgomery. If anyone who has later ORER's could
check for these cars, I would appreciate it.

Jack Wyatt


Re: Pickle car??

al_brown03
 

The January '53 ORER shows *five* WWPX cars: 901,905,910,912,914.
All type TW, all 50-ton except 910 (40-ton).

Another small-industry question: the 1/53 ORER shows Southern Fruit
Distributors, in Orlando (I think on the ACL main south of town), as
having two 8000-gallon, 40-ton TM tanks, type ARA-II. The company
isn't listed in the January *43* ORER. ARA-II tanks weren't built
post 1917 AFAIK, so it'd seem in the interim they bought two 30+
year old cars. (1) Anyone seen a picture? (2) Are there any
commercial models of ARA-II tanks?

Al Brown
Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@..., "Jack Wyatt" <cjwyatt@b...> wrote:
<<
I was just leafing through "Dixie Lines: The L&N Railroad"
and on page 53 there's an amazing freight car -- what appears
to be a flat car with 4 wooden vats on its deck, each one
tapered slightly towards the top. The date is 1969 and the
location is the Florida panhandle. Any clues here?

Tim O.>>

Tim,

I'd like to know more myself. From a little earlier era, my 1/45
ORER shows
a W & W Pickle & Canning Company in Montgomery, AL with four TW
tank cars,
reporting marks, WWPX. My 2/1/52 GM&O Directory of Industry shows
W&W
located on the WRRA at Montgomery. If anyone who has later ORER's
could
check for these cars, I would appreciate it.

Jack Wyatt


Re: Chicago Winslow Improved roof?

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

"Walt" (not signing his full name) wrote:
. . . mentions a "Chicago Winslow Improved roof" and a "Jones-style" door on a 36' box car.
Anyone have an idea what these might be? A steel roof and door, I would imagine.
Nope. Gene Green failed to say so, but the door is wood. The roof is an "inside" roof, so although there is a metal part, it's under the wood outer roof. Thus both would look wood on a model, not steel. I have always loved the fact that for decades, roof manufacturers were always introducing a new model called "improved," indicating, of course, how hard it was to make a genuinely good roof prior to the solid steel roof.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Prototype Modeler kits

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Like all the scribed-wood-siding kits, the scribing is a vast trench between the "boards," a serious exaggeration of the prototype appearance. I built the PFE kit but was never too happy with the final result. If you were to use styrene ends and sides, you would be way ahead of the game.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Prototype Modeler kits

mcindoefalls
 

--- In STMFC@..., "ed_mines" <ed_mines@y...> wrote:

I found a roof which didn't match the floor in length in one of the
PFE kits and an off square floor in another.
And that never happens with resin kits? I've just about given up on them because of parts
that mismatch. Half the time the sides aren't even the same size.

Walt Lankenau


Re: Prototype Modeler kits

mcindoefalls
 

I remember that the PFE model looked a little clunky, heavy battens and such. My friend
George Berisso designed the RI car, and it was much better proportioned. Of course, both
were late '70s wood craftsman kits, so they might not compare with today's injection
molded wonders. I probably have one stashed away somewhere.

Walt Lankenau

--- In STMFC@..., "ed_mines" <ed_mines@y...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., Walt Lankenau wrote: They also did an
even nicer Rock Island wood reefer.

I always wondered what the difference between the 2 cars was, other
than lettering. Plans for both cars are given in the 1931 CBC and
Trainshed reprint - they look the same to me.

I found a roof which didn't match the floor in length in one of the
PFE kits and an off square floor in another.

The underframe on these kits is fragile, being made of wood I beams.

Ed


Re: Prototype Modeler kits

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., Walt Lankenau wrote: They also did an
even nicer Rock Island wood reefer.

I always wondered what the difference between the 2 cars was, other
than lettering. Plans for both cars are given in the 1931 CBC and
Trainshed reprint - they look the same to me.

I found a roof which didn't match the floor in length in one of the
PFE kits and an off square floor in another.

The underframe on these kits is fragile, being made of wood I beams.

Ed


Pickle car??

Tim O'Connor
 

I was just leafing through "Dixie Lines: The L&N Railroad"
and on page 53 there's an amazing freight car -- what appears
to be a flat car with 4 wooden vats on its deck, each one
tapered slightly towards the top. The date is 1969 and the
location is the Florida panhandle. Any clues here?

Tim O.


Re: Chicago Winslow Improved roof?

Gene Green <lgreen@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "mcindoefalls" <mcindoefalls@y...>
wrote:

This post on the CPSIG group:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cpsig/message/5352

mentions a "Chicago Winslow Improved roof" and a "Jones-style" door
on a 36' box car.
Anyone have an idea what these might be? A steel roof and door, I
would imagine.

Walt
The Jones Car Door (Jones Car Door Co.) is illustrated on page 212,
fig. 1223 & 1224, 1906 edition of The Car Builders' Dictionary. It
is a top supported door but instead of having the rollers IN the top
hangers, they are BESIDE the top hangers on levers, the fulcrum of
which is the door hanger. These levers meet in the middle above the
door and are joined to a downward projecting handle. When the handle
is pulled downward the levers left the door hangers off the track
(the door is raised slightly) and the weight of the door is off the
hangers and on the rollers. When the handle is released the door
drops back down until its weight is supported on the hangers.

The Winslow roof is illustrated on page 255 of same dictionary. I
used up all my big words describing the door.

I could send a scan of either item if anyone without access to
the '06 CBD is interested.
Gene Green


Re: BAR 3000-3599 SS boxcars

Jeff Skeels <jbjmskeels@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Gene Green" <lgreen@e...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson
<rhendrickson@o...>
wrote:
Jeff Skeels asks:

The recent thread on State of Maine insulated boxcars piqued
my
interest in the BAR single sheathed cars in the 3000 - 3599
(former
1000 - 1599)series cars seen here;
http://www.fandckits.com/Images/6552Large.jpg

Were those cars all equiped with a wavy brake wheel or was
this
just a damaged wheel.
That's an original brake wheel; I have several other photos of
BAR
single
sheathed box cars with the same type of wheel. The depressions
in
the rim
were intended to engage a brake club for more positive
activation
of the
handbrake.
<snip>
Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520
The hand wheel shown in the photo was patented April 21, 1903 by
Pierce D. Schenck (Patent No. 725,780), was known as the "Perfect
Brake Wheel" and was marketed by the Dayton Manufacturing Company,
Dayton, Ohio. Dayton made a wide variety of malleable castings
mainly for passenger cars and street cars but also had a few items
for freight cars.

Dayton's passenger car hand brakes overlapped Adams and Westlake's
product line to a great extent. Dayton's passenger car hand
brakes
can still be seen occassionally on passengers in current operation
by
Amtrak.

But back to freight car hand brakes. Hand brake manufacturers
would
never admit that a club was needed to tighten a hand brake.
Indeed,
in the patent mentioned above the raised portions are described
as "convenient handles for grasping and abutments to take the
thrust." You can read 'club' into that last phrase if you like.
Some manufacturers even developed hand wheels expressly designed
so
as to prevent the use of a club.

Gene Green
Thanks Richard and Gene;
I suspected that these were designed for "mechanical augmentation"
(read club). I don't have a kit for this car yet, so I don't know
what it has for a brake wheel, but I'll bet it isn't a Dayton. Try
making a pattern for a resin part for that! Mayby an etched part
with 8 spokes and a wheel that bulges out between the spokes so each
segment can alternately be bent up or down...just a thought.

Merry Christmas
Jeff Skeels


Re: Prototype Modeler kits

mcindoefalls
 

They also did an even nicer Rock Island wood reefer.

Walt Lankenau

--- In STMFC@..., Denny Anspach <danspach@m...> wrote:
Recently, I acquired a new-old-stock PFE R-30-13 wood craft kit, the
producer of which was Prototype Modeler. I am unfamiliar with this
company. Could anybody tell me anything about when they were in
operation, and just what kits were produced and for how long?

It looks like a lovely kit.

Denny


--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, California


Chicago Winslow Improved roof?

mcindoefalls
 

This post on the CPSIG group:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/cpsig/message/5352

mentions a "Chicago Winslow Improved roof" and a "Jones-style" door on a 36' box car.
Anyone have an idea what these might be? A steel roof and door, I would imagine.

Walt


Re: NP stock car (Central Valley kit)

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Greg Martin wrote:
If you want to model the car empty, a flat metal weight on top of the floor
really won't show; it's harder than you may think to see through the narrow
gaps between stock car model slats.
Particularly if you paint the weight flat black <g>.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Fresh Grape shipments to Vermont

irv_thomae <ithomae@...>
 

Returning to the first post in this thread, if my sources are correct,
Montpelier and Barre were not the only Vermont towns receiving
carloads of grapes during Prohibition. There was another cluster of
Italian-American granite workers some thirty or so miles east, in
South Ryegate and Groton on the Montpelier & Wells River. In
collecting oral histories from older Ryegate residents, I've several
times been told that "every fall, the Italian families in town would
pool their resources and order a carload of grapes for wine-making."
Combined with Denny Anspach's report, this suggests that
grape-procurement may have been a community effort in some places, and
an entrepeneurial venture in others.
Unfortunately, since most of the old-timers I've talked to would
have been young children at the time in question, they haven't been
able to tell me anything about the refrigerator cars in which those
garpes arrived.

Irv Thomae

----- Original Message -----
From: Denny Anspach
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, December 08, 2004 6:29 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Fresh Grape shipments to Vermont


During a fascinating seven year interregnum when I lived in
Montpelier, VT, I belonged to a small and very tight group of
old-line Ca pitol Vermonters who met one Saturday night each
month to
formally read "papers" of historical interest to the group for
critical comment. I was flattered to be tolerated as the only
"flatlander" outsider, and a "California Flake" to boot.

One of the many memorable subjects presented was story of the annual
of carloads of grapes each fall '20s- '30s to both Montpelier (CV,
and nearby Barre -Barre & Chelsea). The purpose was to provide grapes
for the large Italian stonecutting community residing in these towns
to make home-made wine (allowable during prohibition, if I recall
correctly). As the story went, the newspapers would advertise when
the cars would arrive. They would be spotted in some public place,
and the customers would begin lining up before dawn. The consignor
would then sell the grapes directly from the car until it was empty.

Now, I have always presumed that the grapes came from California, and
probably in PFE reefers, but have no documentation whatsoever.

Does anyone have any knowledge of this esoteric grape trade? If it
occurred in this tiny central Vermont community, it must have also
occurred in many other places during those years.

Denny


--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


Re: NP stock car (Central Valley kit)

Richard Hendrickson
 

In a message dated 12/12/04 8:16:01 AM, b.hom@... writes:

<< http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/np/np82814abp.jpg >>

Ben et al,

Talk about anachronistic, a wooden stock car with an ACI label! Also, any
idea what service this car is in? It appears that the inside has been
sealed,
possibly with plywood. The photo was taken in 1973 in Ft. Worth so its
post BN
merger. I assume, perhaps incorrectly, that the car is no longer in
interchange service. Anybody know the story on these?
Some of these cars were used as tool and material storage cars for many
years after their retirement from revenue service (one advantage of stock
cars for this purpose was that they were well ventilated when gasoline,
kerosene, etc. were stored in them). Often these cars were lined or partly
lined with plywood.

I suppose if discussion of such is verboten here, we can take it over to the
other lists
I don't see why, since the cars were built in the 1920s and '30s.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Re: return of off road hoppers

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

ed_mines wrote:


Am I correct that off road hoppers were returned empty in the summer
when there was an excess of hoppers?
They were returned when empty in the winter, too.

Tim Gilbert


Ted's 1932 ARA Boxcar book

Brian Carlson
 

I received Ted's book via Fed Ex yesterday and finished reading it
today. A most excellent book from a historical and modeling
prospective. The large amount of photo's will clear things up when I
get around to building the 1932 kits I have stocked in the basement.

Brian Carlson


return of off road hoppers

ed_mines
 

Am I correct that off road hoppers were returned empty in the summer
when there was an excess of hoppers?

Ed


king of single sheathed 40 ft. box cars

ed_mines
 

Am I reading the Equipment register correctly that MILW had a series
of single sheathed 40 ft. auto box cars with an interior height of
10 ft. 7in.?

These certainly must have been among the tallest single sheathed 40
ft. box cars. Anyone have an info on them? The series of MILW auto
box cars I'm most familiar with (made famous by Q'Craft's model) had
an inner height of 10 ft.

Can anyone think of a taller 40 ft. wood side car? The NP WWII
emergency single sheathed cars were a close second.

Ed


Re: Prototype Modeler kits

Old Sourdough <pmeaton@...>
 

At 11:44 AM 12/12/2004 -0800, Denny wrote:
Recently, I acquired a new-old-stock PFE R-30-13 wood craft kit, the
producer of which was Prototype Modeler. I am unfamiliar with this
company. Could anybody tell me anything about when they were in
operation, and just what kits were produced and for how long?

It looks like a lovely kit.

Denny
==============================
Denny,

Since I am well stocked for those kits, I need no more and haven't checked
lately, but up until the last time I checked a couple of years ago, those
kits were still being produced by Taurus. I have not Walthers catalog
here, but you can either check yours or check on line. They may still be
available new from the manufacturer.

Paul Eaton
The Old Sourdough
Halibut Guts, Alaska

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