Date   

Re: Floquil, Polly Scale

Rich C <richchrysler@...>
 

Hi all,
Having painted with a number of different model paints over the years, I have pretty much settled on Polyscale and Modelflex for the last few years. It doesn't stink up the house like all the laquer and enamel based paints do (even with a spray booth).
For most of my modelling (taking a tip from the military modelers) I spray the entire model with Polyscale's Steam Power Black, then follow up with the final colour coat. I find that if I back off on the amount of colour appled to the under side areas, it results in a fairly effective "dirt and shaddow" effect. Also using the satin finish of the Steam Power Black, it covers light coloured resins quickly and effctively without having to do a large build up of final colour to cover the resin colour.
All my airbrush (Aztec with the grey tip) cleaning is done with Blue Windex (the one containing amonia). It's a nice clean smell, cleans all the components well, and it's cheap!
Rich Chrysler


Re: Floquil, Polly Scale

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Modelers...it seems...are about as opinionated about choice of paints as they are to choice of railroads. I, like many, have used them all...although not Testors yet.

I have to chuckle a tiny bit. I was painting a brass engine...having spent countless hours trying to determine the proper color for a UP smoke box that had been painted about a year or so ago. The trouble is...of course... that UP added oil to some greyish paint. The amount of oil apparently varied and, of course, the whole thing faded in time. Anyhow, I carefully masked and carefully painted my chosen color. Finally...perfection. Then I gooped various oils and chalk crap all over the damned thing...simulating water sooty running down the sides etc. I got to thinking...now why am I going to all this painting trouble?

BTW, I won't argue with anyone over choice of paints. I will admit that I now use Polyscale...I know, I'm really not a painter now, am I?...almost exclusively. Do I have trouble with it? Yep. It seems to suffer somewhat from age like some others. It tends to gunk up the spray nozzle. But...I'm in Florida. Spray anything for very long and you are going to pop out some water...and I have a series of water traps. I had a rep from one of the paint companies remark about spraying water down here. Anyhow...spray water with non acrylics...not good. In fact...damned bad. Spray water with Polyscale? Keep right on spraying.

Mike Brock


Re: Floquil, Polly Scale

Greg Martin
 

Richard writes...

"Not at all true in my experience, and I use Scalecoat II all the time. I've almost entirely given up on Floquil for rolling stock, whether brass or plastic; the pigment is coarse, you can't decal over it, and the colors shift from one batch to the next."

Don't give up so fast Richard (and others)... The new REV2 formulation of FLOQUIL may change your mind. But remember, you must use their new thinner and I think you will find that this new formulation provides a much smoother finsh. Granted, the "FLOQUIL GHOST" does still work his magic at the plant and I seldom find the batches match, but I ignore the name and look for the color, with the exception of their Zinc Chromate Primer which doesn't seem to vary much if at all. A great match for PRR FCC.

The one issue that I have always had with ScaleCoat 1 or 2 is the shelf life... I find it to be very poor. I am lucky to get more than one painting and come back to a bottle of GOOP. I call that the "Scalecoat GHOST". SO, besides being diffecutl to find locally, I avoid it.

One paint that is sadly overlooked, TESTOR PLA Enamels in the � oz. bottles. This is finely pigmented and with the proper thinner,it sprays well, and dries hard as a rock, and the colors match from bottle to bottle. Great stuff and it mixes within itself well. I often make my own Freight car color with them. The glosses don't blush either.

As for drying, I like Richard use a single 60-watt bulb under a plastic case that protects the subject from dust and come back to it later once dried. I am not in such a hurry that feel the need to finish a multi-colored project in a matter of minutes.

"As for water-based paints like Polly Scale, I've never been able to get satisfactory or consistent results with them, though some other modelers seem able to do so.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520"

Boy I couldn't agree with Richard more here... I was dumbfounded when I sat through a clinic in Naperville with the folks from Badger couldn't or wouldn't answer some of the questions that Roger Meiner and Ed DeRouin fired at them... I'm still waiting for those answers... That really sold me on their Acrylics, albeit I do have some ACCUFLEX still left in the bottles (and their shelf life surprises me)and I like it, but it sprays strange... I liked that product... Spandex in a bottle!

Greg Martin


Chicago Winslow Imroved Roof

John Van Buekenhout <jvanbu1347@...>
 

I am looking for illustrations or descriptions of this style of roof. There is a plan for in the CPSIG for a 36' 8" box car that shows Chicago Winslow Improved Roof for the roof. I want to try a build one or more in O scale. By the way, does any one know where I can obtain handrails for O scale in Canada? By the way, Jack is a nickname.
Jack Van Buekenhout


Re: Floquil, Polly Scale

pennsylvania1954 <stevehprr@...>
 

Apologies. Here is the link.

http://www.testors.com/tes_cds/color_charts/110000_Floquil%20RR%20
(Enamel).pdf

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


--- In STMFC@..., "pennsylvania1954" <stevehprr@e...>
wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., John Fitts <jefitts2003@y...> wrote:
How do you determine which Floquil colors are "gloss?" Is it
indicated on the label?
John--Short answer, sometimes. The CSX Gray bottle I have also has
GLS next to the color name, but Soo Line Red doesn't. Here is the
color chart. Colors over on the left side with (G) by the name are
gloss.

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


Re: NP stock car trucks

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
"I especially hate having my name taken in vain!"

Just stating the facts:

Quoted from STMFC Message #10345, posted by Tim O'Connor, Sat Jul
27, 2002, 1:20 PM:

"I can't imagine why the Accurail truck represents the "state of the
art". It has no micro-lettering on the face of the truck (and in
fact has an embossed "Bettendorf" found on no prototype I've ever
seen); the brake shoes are cast into the sideframe; the sideframe
itself lacks the taper (or bow) of the prototype; the bolster
is not very realistic looking. It is a good truck, correctly
dimensioned, and represents an important prototype. But SOTA?"


Ben Hom


Re: Floquil, Polly Scale

pennsylvania1954 <stevehprr@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., John Fitts <jefitts2003@y...> wrote:
How do you determine which Floquil colors are "gloss?" Is it
indicated on the label?
John--Short answer, sometimes. The CSX Gray bottle I have also has
GLS next to the color name, but Soo Line Red doesn't. Here is the
color chart. Colors over on the left side with (G) by the name are
gloss.

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


Re: Rock Island boxcar paint scheme question

Paul Gehrett
 

For what it's worth - I have two in-service B/W
photos of these cars. One
is dated 12/54 of a car reweighed in '53 but with a
weathered paint job
that was probably applied in the late 1940s, and it
has roman lettering and
black herald background. That car still had auto
racks installed. The
second dates from ca. 1960 and shows a car reweighed
and repainted 7/59
with Roman lettering, lines above or below the
reporting marks and numbers,
large "Rock Island to the right of the doors, and no
black herald
background. It was stenciled on the doors "Paper
Service When Empty
Return to CRI&P RR Kans. City." In both cases the
cars appear to be have
been painted entirely in mineral red, though in the
first example some
paint is flaking off at the corners and the eaves
revealing that the roof
and ends were originally painted black. I hope this
helps.
Richard,

Thanks for the information. Is it possible to get a
copy of the photos that you mentioned? A scanned copy
sent via e-mail would be fine. Please let me know and
thanks again for your help.

Paul Gehrett


Re: Rock Island boxcar paint scheme question

Paul Gehrett
 

Steve, Thanks for the info. This will really help.

Paul Gehrett



In addition to what Richard said, I can offer the
following:

From the RI Standard Practice circular dated July
1944, all-steel boxcars were to be painted Standard
Freight Car color #116 for the body (sides and ends)
The underframe and roof were to be coated with Car
Cement, presumably black. The trucks were painted
black. Wood running boards were to be painted in
the body color.

That Standard Practice was next updated in October
1956. The significant changes were
Car Cement is still used on roofs of repaints,
but new roofs were unpainted (galvanized,
apparently.)
Wood running boards are not mentioned.
Trucks were to be painted with a light coating
of the regular body color

From a historical perspective, the 18 inch tall
block lettered Rock Island was introduced in 1956.
In 1962, that was changed to drop the block road
name and use only a herald. That lasted until 65
when the herald went away in favor of 30 inch tall
block lettering road names. And then... And
then....

Richard, does your 1960 view include BOTH an
outline herald AND the 18" block Rock Island? That
would be the 56-62 era transition, I guess. I would
like to see that one.

I hope this helps.

Steve Hile

[Non-text portions of this message have been
removed]



------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
--------------------~-->
$4.98 domain names from Yahoo!. Register anything.
http://us.click.yahoo.com/Q7_YsB/neXJAA/yQLSAA/9MtolB/TM
--------------------------------------------------------------------~->



Yahoo! Groups Links


STMFC-unsubscribe@...







Re: Prototype Modelers Kits

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Richard Hendrickson writes-

wrote:
Frankly, I really have to wonder why you guys get all nostalgic
about
ancient kits that are quite crude by comparison with what's readily
> available now
As always, Richard is certainly correct that the current plastic and resin offerings (not to mention some brass as well) can result in models superior in their replication of the real thing as compared to offerings of the past.

However, for some, at times, the journey is infinitely more important than the result, and the personal challenge and satisfaction of constructing an intricately-built model of basic raw materials may well trump the challenges of assembling kits of parts pre-made by others- no matter how good.

I greatly admire my fine resin models (and respect profoundly the time that I and others have put into them). However, on a different level, I can also personally admire far more extremely finely built and finished wood, or wood and paper models, if only because I know how much fundamental craftsmanship, skill, patience and care had to be dedicated by the builder (often unknown) to bring it to a high level of accuracy.

With current kits, we benefit from the masters and patterns created by other craftsman. With the older kits, we neglect to acknowledge that each modeler to a great extent has had to create one's own patterns or "master".

Fortunately, the very definition of a "hobby" requires that in any instance, the only person required to be satisfied is the modeler.

Denny








--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


Re: Rock Island boxcar paint scheme question

jaley <jaley@...>
 

On Dec 13, 11:34pm, Steve Hile wrote:
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Rock Island boxcar paint scheme question

In addition to what Richard said, I can offer the following:

From the RI Standard Practice circular dated July 1944,
[SNIP]

"Standard"? Rock Island? Was the RI more apt to follow their own
standards in those days? I'm under the impression that when bankrupcy
loomed, they were more of an "anything goes" type of railroad.

Regards,

-Jeff

--
Jeff Aley jaley@...
DPG Chipsets Product Engineering
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533


Re: NP stock car trucks

Tim O'Connor
 

Ben Hom wrote

Why not? The Accurail "Bettendorf" truck is a nice representation
of a very common prototype (even if Tim O'Connor hates it).
I especially hate having my name taken in vain!

The OTHER style of truck used on the cars doesn't look anything
like the Accurail truck. You could use a model truck with a flatter
arch shape, like Kadee's Vulcan, or the Athearn ASF (although that
one is too modern). I have many "Bettendorf" trucks in my
collection from a variety of manufacturers (many no longer in biz)
-- If I pawed through those for a while I might find another besides
the Accurail that looks right. But unfortunately the Accurail is one
of the very few with a spring plank, which is I'm sure why Ben likes
it so much. :o)

Tim O.

P.S. I have an email somewhere from Richard Hendrickson that says
the Accurail Bettendorf is a 70 ton truck...


Re: Floquil, Polly Scale

John Fitts <jefitts2003@...>
 

How do you determine which Floquil colors are "gloss?" Is it indicated on the label?

buchwaldfam <duff@...> wrote:
I've used Floquil's CSX Black, which is also one of the new gloss
colors. I didn't like it. It didn't cover as well as the old flat
finish Floquil blacks. Also, I don't mind adding a quick coat of
Glosscoat, and IMO a thin coat of flat black plus a thin coat of
gloss still is a thinner total thickness than the gloss black, once
you've put enough on the model to cover well. I've also used plain
old Testors PLA enamel gloss black and like it much more.

Regards,
Phil Buchwald


--- In STMFC@..., "pennsylvania1954" <stevehprr@e...>
wrote:

Having said all that about Scalecoat, a word about Floquil.
Floquil
has brought out a few colors with a gloss finish. I have used the
CSX Gray and SOO LINE Red and found them to be very user friendly
on
plastic, even equal to Scalecoat II.

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL



Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT


---------------------------------
Yahoo! Groups Links

To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/

To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@...

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.




---------------------------------
Do you Yahoo!?
All your favorites on one personal page Try My Yahoo!


Re: Floquil, Polly Scale

buchwaldfam <duff@...>
 

I've used Floquil's CSX Black, which is also one of the new gloss
colors. I didn't like it. It didn't cover as well as the old flat
finish Floquil blacks. Also, I don't mind adding a quick coat of
Glosscoat, and IMO a thin coat of flat black plus a thin coat of
gloss still is a thinner total thickness than the gloss black, once
you've put enough on the model to cover well. I've also used plain
old Testors PLA enamel gloss black and like it much more.

Regards,
Phil Buchwald


--- In STMFC@..., "pennsylvania1954" <stevehprr@e...>
wrote:

Having said all that about Scalecoat, a word about Floquil.
Floquil
has brought out a few colors with a gloss finish. I have used the
CSX Gray and SOO LINE Red and found them to be very user friendly
on
plastic, even equal to Scalecoat II.

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


Re: Even (or odd) numbers only

Ian Cranstone
 

On 14-Dec-04, at 7:00 AM, Mark Mathu wrote:

Back in the pre-World war II days, the railroad I'm researching
(GB&W) used even numbers only for boxcars, and odd numbers only for
flatcars and gondolas. I've seen similar numbering on other Midwest
railroads... what was the reason for numbering cars like that?
As I recall the Canadian Northern and Canadian Pacific prior to 1913 did the same thing (even number for roofed cars, odd numbers for open cars). My theory is that it was a simple check digit -- if you saw an even number on a switchlist or some such document for a coal gondola, you'd know something was wrong.

Ian Cranstone
Osgoode, Ontario, Canada
lamontc@...


ARA 1932 box car book

ed_mines
 

I received my copy of the book this morning.

I've been interested in freight cars for 25 years and have
accumulated a large collections of photos, magazines and books.

I've been wondering how much of this book would be new to me - both
Yankee Clipper and Sunshine had nice handouts to go with their kits.

I am pleasantly surprised that the majority of photos are completely
new to me.

Congratulations on an excellent book Ted. I hope this book and all
your future projects will be big financial successes.

Ed


Re: M&StL box car at Rio Vista

Gene Green <lgreen@...>
 

Oops! Forgot to mention that the M&StL car at Rio Vista, Calif. had
its door widened after the car left the M&StL. Was a 6 foot door
while on the M&StL.
Gene Green


M&StL box car at Rio Vista

Gene Green <lgreen@...>
 

I don't have much information about the car at Rio Vista, Calif. but
if the number on the car is correct (M&StL 28124) then the car at Rio
Vista is a former RF&P car from series 2251-2450. This, if I have my
information correct, is a 40'-6" 'Fowler' car. I'd like to know the
builder and date built for this series if someone on this list has
that information. The M&StL acquired 102 of these cars from Hyman-
Michaels in 1939. Almost all were retired by the M&StL in 1944 and
sold back to Hyman-Michaels. M&StL 28124 was retired in May 1944.
Six cars of the 102 cars were lost to wrecks, one buckled and was
dismantled, and two are unaccounted for.

The cars sold by the M&StL and delivered directly to the US Army
during the Korean War described in an earlier message were from the
M&StL 24000 series, built by GATC in 1930 for the M&StL. Because of
one-of-a-kind ends, these cars are unique although similar to some
MILW cars.

If the folks at Rio Vista ever want to repaint M&StL 28124 I have (at
least part of) the correct stencil diagrams and would be happy to
provide copies.

Is there an expert on the RF&P on this list? I'd like more info on
the above mentioned RF&P box car series.

Gene Green

Gene Green


Re: Fresh Grape shipments to Vermont

Douglas Harding <d.harding@...>
 

In the early 1900's Southern Iowa had a rather large grape growers
association. Their building still stands in Council Bluffs. Could they have
been selling/shipping grapes to Vermont? Don't recall Iowa ever being known
for wine production. And New York State, the finger lakes area, raises a lot
of grapes. Might have been a more likely source for grapes going to Vermont.

Doug Harding
Iowa Central Railroad
http//d.harding.home.mchsi.com


Re: Questions about pulpwood Racks

Phil Clark
 

Fred, I agree the pulpwood/rack material is hard to find. Your post
reminds me:

...many pulpwood cars seemed to have a floor with a wide V cross
section to keep the
logs from sliding off. Some had flat wood floors with rail spiked
down on the center
line and both sides. Logs were usually cut from pine not more than
8 or 9 inches diameter > and were 5 feet long.

I presume the V cross section floor was designed for stacking the
five foot long logs without need for securing tie downs.

Were the five foot lengths specified by the receiving mill at that
time or was the five foot log length of a nine inch diameter log the
weight limit for the loaders at that time? before a machine could
load the car.
When did mechanised loaders appear?
I want to build a pulp car loading Carolina scene on my late
fiftIes / early sixties H0 model.

I'd appreciate your comments.

Phil Clark, ALTON GU34 2RS, UK
cell: +44(0)-7792-744-327
ACL & SAL HS since 1998
NMRA #55716 BR#10/119

160721 - 160740 of 197105