Date   

Re: Tannery Chemicals

ljack70117@...
 

On Wednesday, December 22, 2004, at 05:22 PM, buchwaldfam wrote:



In the MRHS book "The Beer Line", there are several references to
tanneries which were either located directly on line, or were
directly across the Milwaukee River from the CMStP&P, which received
their raw hides and chemicals by rail. In the mid-'50s, what types
of chemicals were used by tanneries, and how were those chemicals
shipped, tank, box, etc.? (I added the era requirement because I've
read that General Motors was adding the "leather smell" to their
leather interiors since the tanning process of that time didn't
produce what people expected to smell! Therefore, the process must
have changed between, say 1955 and 1965, or the leather products
would still have "that real leather smell"!)

Thanks in advance!

Regards,
Phil Buchwald
Real leather products still have the leather smell. It is the imitation leather that has no leather smell.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@...
There are many things to be thankful for but the one that stands out the most is "wrinkles" do not hurt.


Re: Tannery Chemicals

Shawn Beckert
 

Phil,

Check out this web site:

www.epa.gov/ttnchie1/ap42/ch09/final/c9s15.pdf

I think you'll need some tank cars...

Shawn Beckert

-----Original Message-----
From:
sentto-2554753-36818-1103754130-shawn.beckert=disney.com@....
yahoo.com
[mailto:sentto-2554753-36818-1103754130-shawn.beckert=disney.com@returns
.groups.yahoo.com]On Behalf Of buchwaldfam
Sent: Wednesday, December 22, 2004 2:22 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Tannery Chemicals




In the MRHS book "The Beer Line", there are several references to
tanneries which were either located directly on line, or were
directly across the Milwaukee River from the CMStP&P, which received
their raw hides and chemicals by rail. In the mid-'50s, what types
of chemicals were used by tanneries, and how were those chemicals
shipped, tank, box, etc.? (I added the era requirement because I've
read that General Motors was adding the "leather smell" to their
leather interiors since the tanning process of that time didn't
produce what people expected to smell! Therefore, the process must
have changed between, say 1955 and 1965, or the leather products
would still have "that real leather smell"!)

Thanks in advance!

Regards,
Phil Buchwald







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Re: Gentlemen start your (search) engines

vyoung5622@...
 

In a message dated 12/22/2004 5:42:34 PM Central Standard Time,
tgregmrtn@... writes:

And for those Republicans out there, please don't look at the Heinz
reefers...




Hello,

After all, they're only reefers.

Virgil Young
Amarillo, TX
vyoung5622@...


Tannery Chemicals

buchwaldfam <duff@...>
 

In the MRHS book "The Beer Line", there are several references to
tanneries which were either located directly on line, or were
directly across the Milwaukee River from the CMStP&P, which received
their raw hides and chemicals by rail. In the mid-'50s, what types
of chemicals were used by tanneries, and how were those chemicals
shipped, tank, box, etc.? (I added the era requirement because I've
read that General Motors was adding the "leather smell" to their
leather interiors since the tanning process of that time didn't
produce what people expected to smell! Therefore, the process must
have changed between, say 1955 and 1965, or the leather products
would still have "that real leather smell"!)

Thanks in advance!

Regards,
Phil Buchwald


lost styrene & brass casting

dphobbies
 

Larry and Bill

I believe you are both right. 8% for original masters and 4% for
the production masters is pretty common for production. However if
one is using something like Castaldo's "No Shrink Pink" the mold
rubber shrinkage is negligable notwithstanding the metal shrink.

Also I don't think anyone mentioned vacuum casting machines, as
opposed to spin casting. In this process the metal is sucked into
the investment by vacuum. A lot of jewelry is now done this way.

In 1/4" there are quite a few folks doing plastic to brass
patterns. I recently saw an Erie trailing truck kit made that way.
The frame was made of styrene and molded flat for the first
generation and then formed and cleaned up for the production cast.
Rather ingenious.

Dennis and Kathy Mashburn of K&D Casting, 3849 Westchester Dr.,
Abilene, TX 79606 do a lot of this type of casting. Dennis is a
retired Air force B-1 guy that got into casting several years ago
and turned it into a full time business. He usually gives
a "Plastic to Brass" clinic at the O Scale Nationals, Chicago March
meet and O Scale West.

I'm reasonably familiar with K&D's work having seen O, S, HO and G
Scale castings. One of the neatest things he does is old plastic
large scale locos. Recently I saw parts for Ertl's 1/24 General kit.

Obviously, I am fond of K&D, so the usual disclaimer doesn't apply.

Ron Sebastian
Des Plaines


Re: Mather Box Car Plans

Eugene Deimling <gene48@...>
 

Contact me offline
Gene Deimling

-----Original Message-----
From: hmeisser [mailto:h.meisser@...]
Sent: Wednesday, December 22, 2004 12:06 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Mather Box Car Plans



I see in "O Scale Trains" that Jim Zwernemann took third place for a
scratchbuilt Mather box car. I don't know how to contact Jim, so...
My questions is: does anyone know of plans for the Mather box car?

Thanks, Hugo Meisser








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Current Sunshine Kit List

Michael Aufderheide
 

Hi,

Does anyone have a Sunshine Fall 2004 Kit Update List they could scan
and post? (Assuming he produced such a thing as they have before)Or
if someone could snail mail me a copy I'd be happy to scan it for the
group.

Thanks,

Mike Aufderheide


Re: MILW STEEL BOXCAR AT UNION, IL

Montford Switzer <ZOE@...>
 

Kevin, Thanks for your response. My records are now complete. Mont
Switzer

-----Original Message-----
From: kevinhlafferty [mailto:KevinHLafferty@...]
Sent: Monday, December 20, 2004 7:21 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: MILW STEEL BOXCAR AT UNION, IL



Mont,

It's 19331. Blt 1940.

Kevin Lafferty


--- In STMFC@..., "" <ZOE@I...> wrote:
GROUP:

Could some one tell me what the car number is on the MILW
horizontal rib
boxcar that is preserved at Union, IL.

Thanks in advance, Mont Switzer






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Re: Athearn News

Walter M. Clark
 

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@o...>
wrote:
Pete Brown asks, regarding the Athearn Allied FC trucks:

How do they compare to the ones that come with the Walthers troop cars?
I can't say, Pete, having not yet seen the Walthers trucks. I've been
told, however, the the Walthers trucks are also very well done.
Feast or
famine, as usual; after all these years of having no decent Allied
trucks,
we now get them from two different mfrs.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520
And I've got three pair of brass (still unpainted, even) Allied Full
Cushion trucks from Hallmark that cost me almost $10/pr. over twenty
years ago. Oh, well.

Walter M. Clark
Time stopped in November 1941
Riverside, California


Mather Box Car Plans

hmeisser <h.meisser@...>
 

I see in "O Scale Trains" that Jim Zwernemann took third place for a
scratchbuilt Mather box car. I don't know how to contact Jim, so...
My questions is: does anyone know of plans for the Mather box car?

Thanks, Hugo Meisser


Re: Dates K brakes and Andrews trucks banned from interchange

hmeisser <h.meisser@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Mark Heiden" <mark_heiden@h...> wrote:

Hello everyone,

What were the dates that K brakes and Andrews trucks were banned
from
interchange?

Thanks,
Mark Heiden
I have some notes on various "events" which include:
1926; Type AB brake ystems begin testing.
9/1/33; Type K brakes no longer allowed on new cars.
1953; Type K brakes no longer allowed on cars in interchange
(initially 1/1/45, but set back).
1910; Bettendorf T-section trucks introduced.
1920; ARA standard for Bettendorf-style U-section trucks established.
1930; Arch bar trucks banned for new cars.
1941; Arch bar trucks banned for interchange (initially 1936, then
1939, then 1941).

Hope this helps.
Hugo Meisser


Bill Welch please contact me offline

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Bill Welch please contact me off line. Thanks.

Mike Brock


Re: Salvaging drytransfers? Success!!

pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Microscale. I quite enjoy their product. Not too thin, not too thick.
Can stand up to a fair bit of handling without tearing. Seems to have
a good shelf life as well.
Pierre Oliver
http://www.elgincarshops.com/


--- In STMFC@..., pierre oliver wrote: "I've managed to
get the 7 sets of dry transfers to a workable condition. I've
applied them all on to clear decal film.....".

What decal film did you use?

Ed


Re: UP A-50-16 hand brakes

Richard Hendrickson
 

Miner on 474343 and 175005.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Re: Salvaging drytransfers? Success!!

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., pierre oliver wrote: "I've managed to
get the 7 sets of dry transfers to a workable condition. I've
applied them all on to clear decal film.....".

What decal film did you use?

Ed


Re: Decals & Distilled Water

hoghead32 <buckfiveoh@...>
 

I use distilled water because it doesn''t stain the surface of the
work like common tap water tends to do. I use a small black plastic
tray from some frozen dinner for a bath. The dark color keeps the
lighter decals visible. Before I start, several drops of solvent are
added to the decal bath.

I slide the decal off the paper and onto the model. I drain some
water off with tissue, but try to leave enough water to position
the 'cal. When all is right, I remove the rest of the water; if it
isn't right, add water back to the film and reposition the decal.
Next I introduce setting solvent [I use Champ's] by bleeding it along
the edges of the 'cal with a fine brush. This allows the solvent to
leak under the decal without moving it. After this solvent has spread
under the film, I add more solvent to the top of the film. When the
decal has dried, the model is ready for overspray. I've had great
success with this method on plastic freight cars, diesels and brass.

hoghead32


Re: UP A-50-16 hand brakes

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Dec 22, 2004, at 6:34 AM, Ted Culotta wrote:

On Dec 22, 2004, at 6:22 AM, Gene Green wrote:

>  Ted,
>  Ajax and Miner are the only two hand brake companies whose brake
>  DIDN'T change much externally. 
>
>  When were the UP cars built?  I can probably give you the
information
>  you need if we can assume that the hand brakes applied were current
>  production. 
>
>  The reason this assumption may have pitfalls is that during the
late
>  depression Ajax manufactured hand brakes and stock-piled them. 
When
>  car building resumed in the run-up to World War Two Ajax was ready
to
>  delivery hand brakes immediately when the other manufacturers
weren't.
>  Gene Green
>  ---------------------------------------------
>  --- In STMFC@..., Ted Culotta <tculotta@s...> wrote:
>  > Does anybody have any photos of the UP A-50-16 auto cars that
>  > definitively show the type of hand brake?  The car diagram just
>  lists
>  > Ajax and miner with no further break down (typical UP car diagram
>  > detail).  These cars were 474000-474499 and later 175000-175499.
>

Gene:

The issue I was having was not which versions were used, but which
brand went on which cars in the lot.  I was assuming that the brakes
themselves were the Ajax 14038 with No. 3059 hand wheel and Miner
D-3290 with D-3279 hand wheel.  The cars were built in 8-9/1940.
That should be Ajax 3059-2 hand wheel. No coffee yet.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
100 14th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94402
info@...
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912


Re: UP A-50-16 hand brakes

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Dec 22, 2004, at 6:22 AM, Gene Green wrote:

Ted,
Ajax and Miner are the only two hand brake companies whose brake
DIDN'T change much externally. 

When were the UP cars built?  I can probably give you the information
you need if we can assume that the hand brakes applied were current
production. 

The reason this assumption may have pitfalls is that during the late
depression Ajax manufactured hand brakes and stock-piled them.  When
car building resumed in the run-up to World War Two Ajax was ready to
delivery hand brakes immediately when the other manufacturers weren't.
Gene Green
---------------------------------------------
--- In STMFC@..., Ted Culotta <tculotta@s...> wrote:
> Does anybody have any photos of the UP A-50-16 auto cars that
> definitively show the type of hand brake?  The car diagram just
lists
> Ajax and miner with no further break down (typical UP car diagram
> detail).  These cars were 474000-474499 and later 175000-175499.
Gene:

The issue I was having was not which versions were used, but which
brand went on which cars in the lot. I was assuming that the brakes
themselves were the Ajax 14038 with No. 3059 hand wheel and Miner
D-3290 with D-3279 hand wheel. The cars were built in 8-9/1940.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
100 14th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94402
info@...
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912


Re: UP A-50-16 hand brakes

Gene Green <lgreen@...>
 

Ted,
Ajax and Miner are the only two hand brake companies whose brake
DIDN'T change much externally.

When were the UP cars built? I can probably give you the information
you need if we can assume that the hand brakes applied were current
production.

The reason this assumption may have pitfalls is that during the late
depression Ajax manufactured hand brakes and stock-piled them. When
car building resumed in the run-up to World War Two Ajax was ready to
delivery hand brakes immediately when the other manufacturers weren't.
Gene Green
---------------------------------------------
--- In STMFC@..., Ted Culotta <tculotta@s...> wrote:
Does anybody have any photos of the UP A-50-16 auto cars that
definitively show the type of hand brake? The car diagram just
lists
Ajax and miner with no further break down (typical UP car diagram
detail). These cars were 474000-474499 and later 175000-175499.

Regards,
Ted Culotta


Re: lost styrene & wax casting

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2004 22:25:33 -0500
From: ljack70117@...
Subject: Re: lost styrene & wax casting
...If you need any thing more from me contact me
direct.

Thank you
Larry Jackman

Thanks Larry. I'm just passing on what Stan told me.
I'm sure you are correct about the degree of
shrinkage. It probably depends on the particular alloy
you are using. And if I were making patterns, I would
most surely consult with the caster about shrinkage.
My point in my post is the fact that most parts are in
fact second-generation, and you have to account for a
double case of shrinkage before you make the pattern.

=====
Bill Daniels
Tucson, AZ



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