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Re: Sunshine 40' gons

Jim and Lisa Hayes <jimandlisa97225@...>
 

A list of all Sunshine kits including the new gondolas can be found at
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/modeling/new%20products/sunshine/sunkits1220
04main.html
Any listing that doesn't say Discontinued should be available. Since I don't
have a direct pipeline to Sunshine, total accuracy is not guaranteed.

Sorry about the empty folder in the Files section. I deleted it. Not all the
gons are listed in the Sunshine file in the Files section. The one at the
Steam Era Freight Cars site is more up-to-date.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon


Sunshine 40' gons

Bob Weston
 

Hi Guys!
Anyone have info on Sunshine's 40' gons? I'd like to have part
numbers and prices.
Comments from listers who have built these cars are also
welcome. Thanks!
Bob


Re: Freight Tariffs

Tim O'Connor
 

Tony Thompson wrote

Most tariffs (except for tank cars) were by weight, not volume.
I haven't seen a railroad tarriff, but I saw a trucking LTL sheet
for paints -- and every single type of possible container had a
price related to it -- 5 gallon cans, 1 gallon cans, cartons of
bottles, etc. I suppose when they write the tarriff they take
into account the weight per cubic foot of the item?

And someone else wrote... []

I'm still wondering about that statement that one can substitute
2 cars for 1? How about, 10 for 7? I am course wondering what the
big deal was about increasing car capacity from 50 to 70 to 100
tons each. Why would shippers have cared? I think it is because
they get a rate specific to each type of car, and bigger cars got
lower rates.

Tim O.


Re: "Boraxo" Covered Hoppers

Carrock1998@...
 

does Bob's Photo have a web address?

Robert R. Jackson


Re: Perishables in Chicago

Tim O'Connor
 

Tony Thompson wrote

Omigawd! And here our friend Richard has been brainwashing us
that Uncle John was ALWAYS a fast freight road!! Will wonders never
cease?
What wonder? I've been saying that for years... :-)

Tim O.


Re: Library of Congress ORER Holdings

C J Wyatt
 

Another ORER collection (not complete, but they have some old ones)
is the Kalmbach Library of the NMRA:

http://www.nmra.org/library/ORER.html

I believe that for a fee they will make copies of pages that you are
interested in and mail them to you.

Jack Wyatt


Re: History of ORER

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Ron Rudnick wrote:
The collection at the CRSM begins circa 1915-1920 and continues on from there.
Nope. The earliest at CSRM is 1898, and they have most issues from then into the 1970s. Stanford's collection does date back to the first issue in 1885, but I'm told they no longer permit photocopying of these old and fragile books.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Water for steam

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Charles Morrill wrote:
The SP also used MOW tank cars of water behind steam locos sometimes. On
both the standard gauge and narrow gauge lines.
But I think those were auxiliary tenders, not shipments to distant water tanks.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Freight Tariffs

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Phil Buchwald wrote:
In general terms, how were shippers charged for the railroad's
services. In particular, a shipper has 3/4ths of a 1944 box car
volume worth of widgets, but the railroad supplies a 1923 built 8
1/2 foot tall car, which gets filled to the rim with the same number
of widgets. Do the shippers get charged for "a car and up to 50 tons
times X number of miles", for "volume times weight times miles", or
what?
Most tariffs (except for tank cars) were by weight, not volume.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Perishables in Chicago

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jerry Stewart wrote:
I might add that Santa Fe was not known as
a particularly fast railroad in Chicago, or for having
very fast freight schedules to the West coast from Chicago
in the 1930's and 40's. This can be seen in a recent issue
of the Santa Fe modelers "Warbonnet" featuring the fast
freight schedules and services, if you would like to call
it that. Santa Fe was running most of the railroad with
old 2-8-2's and it shows in the timings over the road.
Omigawd! And here our friend Richard has been brainwashing us that Uncle John was ALWAYS a fast freight road!! Will wonders never cease?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Freight Tariffs

Tim O'Connor
 

Phil, no and no. It you didn't have a carload (or close to),
then you sent it l.c.l.

You might substitute two cars for one car, but it costs you
plenty. And the customer could refuse the cars. I suppose a
coal mine may not care, but if you're shipping merchandise
or machinery the car type & size might be important.

OK, I can understand it at this level. If you ordered a car, you
paid a minimum weight regardless of how small your shipment was. As
your shipment weight went up, the rate slid up accordingly.
Relating this to a model railroad, I may have to run two 40 ton
cars to a siding if I decide that there is no 50 ton car available
that day.


Re: Freight Tariffs

buchwaldfam <duff@...>
 

OK, I can understand it at this level. If you ordered a car, you
paid a minimum weight regardless of how small your shipment was. As
your shipment weight went up, the rate slid up accordingly.
Relating this to a model railroad, I may have to run two 40 ton
cars to a siding if I decide that there is no 50 ton car available
that day.

Of course, as my brain runs off on a tangent to this, (and this
is a BIG jump!), taking a look at the USRA cars: If the technology
had developed to the point where the 50 ton car was practical, why
didn't the USRA simply standardize on the 50 ton car? Instead, they
had standard designs in both 40 AND 50 tons capacity?
Thanks!
Phil Buchwald




I am not the expert on this, but I have studied the 1900 period of
tarrifs.

For you "widgets". The tarrif will specify a rate per hundred
pounds.
It appears you are talking about a carload rate, so we also need
to
know the minimum carload weight for widgets. If we are less then
the
carload weight, we still pay for that minimum weight. If we are
over
we payu by the hundred weight. As long as our volume of widgets
fits
the car provided, we are fine. If we requested a car based on
volume,
then some exceptions take place.

With livestock there are some execptions on the size ordered verses
the size recieved. Even in boxcar shipments, if we ordered a
100,000
lb car and had that weight to ship, and the railroad provided a
80,000
lb car, the additional 20,000 lb could be loaded in another car and
both cars would be considered as a one car shipment at the
conveniance
of the railroad.

On the grain markings you mentioned. Various grains weight in
differently, these lines mark where the load would be equal to the
cars weight capacity. These serve as a guide at the elevator for
loading.

Howard Garner


Re: Library of Congress ORER Holdings

Richard Townsend
 

While I am located on the west coast, I get to Washington, DC several times a year (coincidentally around the time of the Timonium swap meets) and almost never get anywhere near Sacramento or Palo Alto. I don't suppose UVA has any old ORERs?

Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

Chris BCarkan writes:

I recall others in the past saying there were
pretty good holdings of ORERs in the New York Public library (on-line
catalogue >I think and a few other libraries and museums around the
country. �Since you
are in Oregon, perhaps someone can chime in regarding left coast locations
(Cal.Rwy Museum?).
CSRM has extensive, though not complete, ORER holdings, including some
issues before the turn of the 20th C. �Stanford has a more complete
collection, which will presumably become readily available on-line if
Goggle's ambitious scheme to digitize the entire Stanford library
materializes.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


--
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


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Re: Rail Classics

Tim O'Connor
 

Weren't they working on PRR G31 gondolas, as well as the H2a?
If so, too bad. They were a quality importer.


History of ORER

Rudnick <spark@...>
 

The very first issue of the equipment guide was June, 1885, and was titled Sechrist's Hand-Book and Railway Equipment and Mileage Guide, within in few years the title was shortened to the Offical Railway Equipment Guide, (O. R. E. G.)and later, not sure of the date it was changed to the Official Railway Equipment Register, (O. R. E. R.)
So you have another couple of names to Google
From a few tidbits I read years ago in the Railroad Gazette, IIRC, there was talk about the necessity of such a book and there was at least one competitor, who did publish something, but the Railroad Gazette had seen had seen some samples of what Mr. Sechrist was attempting to do, and threw their weight behind his project.
The collection at the CRSM begins circa 1915-1920 and continues on from there.
For those who might need pre turn of the century rosters contact me off line, as I have a large collection of photo copies beginning with Vol. 1 #1
Ron Rudnick


Re: Library of Congress ORER Holdings

Richard Hendrickson
 

Chris BCarkan writes:

I recall others in the past saying there were
pretty good holdings of ORERs in the New York Public library (on-line
catalogue >I think and a few other libraries and museums around the
country. Since you
are in Oregon, perhaps someone can chime in regarding left coast locations
(Cal.Rwy Museum?).
CSRM has extensive, though not complete, ORER holdings, including some
issues before the turn of the 20th C. Stanford has a more complete
collection, which will presumably become readily available on-line if
Goggle's ambitious scheme to digitize the entire Stanford library
materializes.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Re: Sunshine Models Trip to California

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

Winterail is Saturday and Pleasanton is Sunday, March 13 & 14.<
Ted,
The 14th is a Monday on my calendar<G>, I suspect you mean March 12 and
13!

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Off topic -ITEMS FOR SALE

cv_sne@...
 

Hello all,

After realizing that there is no more open space under the layout, in the crawl space, or in my workshop I need to make some room. Therefore I have compiled a list of items that are willing and able to go to good homes. (I tried to get this done several months ago and simply ran out of time -- this time I got the list done first!)

This list includes resin and plastic car kits, locomotives, structure kits, books, and detail parts. All HO scale. I do have some N scale items that I will be offering on the n-scale yahoo list some time in the future.

PLEASE reply to my HOME E-MAIL address -- cv_sne@... -- if you are interested in receiving a copy of the list. And leave the "ITEMS FOR SALE" subject line in your reply.

Do not reply to the list, or to my InterMountain (work address).

I will gather up the names of all interested and send the list to all sometime Monday evening (approx 6 pm Mountain Time).

Thanks, and sorry for the wasted bandwidth.

Marty


Rail Classics H-2/2a/3 project (not)

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

Well, it looks like the Broadway Limited H-2a hoppers are the only ones we'll see, beyond the Eastern Car Works' ones. Rail Classics has announced that they are getting out of the brass business.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
100 14th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94402
info@...
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912


Larger Capacity Freight Cars

CBarkan@...
 

This is a classic economy of scale example. The higher the car's capacity,
the more efficient it is for the railroad to operate because the extra weight
does not result in a proportional increase in costs (either first cost or
operating cost). Thus the cost per ton-mile went down. Presumably this has been
the basis for the steady increase in railcar capacity over the past 150 years,
and it certainly is behind the present move from 100 to 110 ton capacity cars.
The Southern Rwy Big John hopper example (cited earlier today) is a good
case in point. The larger more efficient car meant the Southern could charge a
lower rate and still turn a profit on a commodity, thus altering the
competitive balance, much to the chagrin of Southern's competitors.

Chris

In a message dated 1/23/05 2:28:54 PM, timboconnor@... writes:

<< I am course wondering what the
big deal was about increasing car capacity from 50 to 70 to 100
tons each. Why would shippers have cared? I think it is because
they get a rate specific to each type of car, and bigger cars got
lower rates. >>

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