Date   

Re: A Certain American Company

centga@...
 

In a message dated 1/27/2005 7:57:14 PM Eastern Standard Time,
thompson@... writes:
Todd, do you mean "do road names" for roads which didn't have
the car in question? LL has specifically chosen not to do this, so that
any Proto2000 model can be relied on to be accurate, or very close.
That's one reason for the "obscure roads" you mention. Many other
mfgrs. put whatever road name they like (Athearn is about as
promiscuous as they come in this regard), but not LL. Personally, I
prefer it that way. Of course, YMMV.
Tony, sorry to be confusing. What I meant was that LL has models but they
have chosen not to do certain roads that had the same car or locomotive. Case in
point, they have so far refused to do anything C of G even though they
currenly have about half a dozen models that would apply. The argument will likely
come back as a small and obscure road but then I say look at Atlas. They did a
run of TA&G GP-38's. They promply sold out and Atlas did a run of them with the
GP-7 model. My point is that if you have the tooling for the model why not
try something new? I'm 100% against freelace schemes as well. Todd Horton


Re: DL&W canister gondolas

Blake D. Tatar <BDTatar@...>
 

Thanks Brian.


Re: A Certain American Company (was new Walthers USRA 55 ton hopper)

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Steve Fuchs writes:
"How many more UP Challengers do we need."

Well, actually, at least one more. I refer to the first Challenger, the so-called "light" Challenger, the first series of 15 engines delivered in 1936.

Mike Brock


Re: New Walthers hopper

Garth Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Friends,

Everything is blurred in this new transnational world. I drive a Subaru, a Japanese car built in Indiana.

I don't want to stray too far from our central topic here (freight cars), but the economic consequences of light manufacturing going global are of some concern to me. Among the brands which interest members of this list that have shifted production, or at least assembly, to China are Walthers, LifeLike/Proto 2000, Bachmann, Red Caboose, Intermountain, and the Horizon group (Athearn and Roundhouse). In addition, Intermountain has been assembling Tichy, Bethlehem Car Works, and maybe some other brands in China. Add to that LBF (remember how owner Fred Becker made a big thing about Front Range being an American-made product?), though their products are too modern for our usual discussion. Last year or so we even discussed an unnamed resin manufacturer which had done some test assembly in China.

Now I don't have any prejudice per se against products made/assembled in China, or any other foreign country. Such railroad hobby products are often of excellent quality, and a fine value. I very much doubt that we will see much outsourcing of American jobs because of Chinese or other foreign model train manufacture, and any losses may be well balanced by increased distribution staff here at home. What does concern me is our general trade deficit and the consequences to our economy if it is not brought under control soon. On NPR just this morning there was talk about a "correction" in the economy (read "major recession") if something isn't changed soon. Model trains are a tiny part of the problem, but they do make a contribution.

Although I have more than enough hobby stuff to keep me busy for the rest of my life, I am still going to buy more since new products do show up, interests change, and layouts grow or are replaced. But every time I buy a foreign made product I feel a bit uneasy about my contribution to the trade deficit. This is a hobby, after all, and hobbies are a luxury, not a necessity.

If Mike will permit, I would be interested in hearing the group's thoughts on this. That is, up to a point.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Larry Smith wrote:

The lines for buying American has really become blurred especially here in Alabama when Mercades produces SUVs 30 miles from me and Honda produces their minivan in the other direction 40 miles and then you have Hyndei building cars in Montgomery.

Enough said, lol

Larry Smith


Re: A Certain American Company (was new Walthers USRA 55 ton hopper)

fuchst900
 

I feel like the proto line has raised the bar for the hobby, I cant falt them if they need to generate income some other way. I will not be buying the coolers so the are after a different market. The question I have is how they arrive at what they are going to produce in the hobby line. How many more UP Challengers do we need. How may more C&O engines will be produced vs the many other pieces of equipment that are equally noteworthy. Steve

"Beckert, Shawn" <shawn.beckert@...> wrote:Tony writes:

There is nothing wrong with loyalty to American companies and
workers, but such loyalty ought to be an informed loyalty.
Companies do vary in their practices in this area.
Speaking of loyalty to a company - and freight cars <g>, has
anyone here been paying attention to Life-Like lately? Every
time I check out their web page there's another non-railroad
product, like drink coolers and foam packing material. The
latest "railroad" item: Norman Rockwell "collectible" boxcars.

There's been no new *railroad* products announced for quite
some time, only reincarnations of old cars and locomotives with
sound and other nonsense. I have a closetful of Proto-2000 kits
and locomotives, probably more than I'll ever have time to build.
I can say with some confidence that unless they come up with a
new and different "railroad" product, they will have lost my
customer loyalty - and hobby dollars - for good.

Shawn Beckert


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New Walthers hopper

Larry Smith
 

The lines for buying American has really become blurred especially here in Alabama when Mercades produces SUVs 30 miles from me and Honda produces their minivan in the other direction 40 miles and then you have Hyndei building cars in Montgomery.

Enough said, lol

Larry Smith


Re: A New Book Soon

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Tony Thompson announces a new book, but completely neglects to tell us which ink-stained wretch might indeed be the author.

Denny
--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


A Certain American Company (was new Walthers USRA 55 ton hopper)

Shawn Beckert
 

Tony writes:

There is nothing wrong with loyalty to American companies and
workers, but such loyalty ought to be an informed loyalty.
Companies do vary in their practices in this area.
Speaking of loyalty to a company - and freight cars <g>, has
anyone here been paying attention to Life-Like lately? Every
time I check out their web page there's another non-railroad
product, like drink coolers and foam packing material. The
latest "railroad" item: Norman Rockwell "collectible" boxcars.

There's been no new *railroad* products announced for quite
some time, only reincarnations of old cars and locomotives with
sound and other nonsense. I have a closetful of Proto-2000 kits
and locomotives, probably more than I'll ever have time to build.
I can say with some confidence that unless they come up with a
new and different "railroad" product, they will have lost my
customer loyalty - and hobby dollars - for good.

Shawn Beckert


Re: New Walthers USRA 55 ton hopper

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jay Bingham wrote:
With the growth of historically national coporations into multi
national corporations and their presence in China, the auto makers,
retailers such as Walmart and Home Depot, food service coporations
such as McDonalds, the distinction between buying American blurs.
When a Ford automobile has fewer American-made parts than some Toyota models, the distinction is indeed blurred. There is nothing wrong with loyalty to American companies and workers, but such loyalty ought to be an informed loyalty. Companies do vary in their practices in this area.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: New Walthers USRA 55 ton hopper

Jay Bingham <j.bingham@...>
 

Garth Groff wrote:

The Accurail car lists at $9.98, while
the Walthers car is over $13 :-$ , but I suppose it is fully
assembled
(in China, of course). I don't see that we're being well served
here. I
would rather stick with Accurail, which at least is an American
product.


With the growth of historically national coporations into multi
national corporations and their presence in China, the auto makers,
retailers such as Walmart and Home Depot, food service coporations
such as McDonalds, the distinction between buying American blurs.
Arguably the wage paid to the plant employe assembling the Walther's
product allows that Chinese worker to go to McDonalds for supper and
to go to Walmart to supply his or her home thus adding to the bottom
line of such coporations.

Jay Bingham
Pacific Palasades, CA


Re: Comments on B&M X29 box cars in RMC ad

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Steve Fuchs asked:
"How was the Duryea Underframes different? If one were to model a
car with this frame what would be the major visual differences?"

Going back to Ted's model of this car
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/calendar/2002/nap02/bm71968main.html
the major visual differences are the prominent outer cross members
and "hanging" center sill. The coupler pockets are also slightly
extended (though nowhere near that of a modern cushion underframe.)

Here's a drawing from the 1940 Car Builders' Cyclopedia showing the
Duryea cushion underframe as applied to a flat car, as posted on Ted
Culotta's Steam Era Freight Cars website:
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/prototype/frtcars/duryeacbc.html


Ben Hom


Re: Usage fees

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jared Harper wrote:
I appreciate this also. Being a person who has researched and
written books the cost of getting copies of photos and then using
them in your publication can be prohibitive. I have limited the
use of photos from certain sources because of the costs. I realize
museums and libraries need to maintain their collections, but it
also needs to be kept in mind that most historical researchers do
not operate with big budgets. For people like me who do it as an
adjunct to their hobby it is even more true. Also, it is unlikely
we can recoup the expenses through the publication process. Writers
of railroad books do not get rich. We may be lucky to break even.
Our reward is knowing we have helped preserve part of the historical
record and what small measure of "fame" that might accrue.
Well said, Jared. The most glaring current example is the UP Museum, which has raised fees very high, not just for individuals but for TV and movie use also, and (apparently to their astonishment) revenues from the Museum have plummeted. The reason for raising fees was, as you might guess, to increase revenue. I assume there were a few lectures in Economics 101 which these people failed to attend.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Comments on B&M X-29 box cars in RMC ad

fuchst900
 

How was the Duryea Underframes different. If one were to model a car with this frame what would be the major visual differences, Steve Fuchs

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...> wrote:
On Jan 26, 2005, at 5:42 PM, timgilbert17851 wrote:


--- In STMFC@..., Ted Culotta <tculotta@s...> wrote:
>

> It's a 1923 ARA design box car - there were 21 for the B&M and 4 for
> MTC. The doors (NOT reverse Creco - there is no such animal) are
> correct for an as built car, but by then, me thinks they all had
been
> fitted with Youngstown corrugated doors. Since they were also top
hung
> doors, the door tracks are incorrect. You can get the correcr parts
> from several sets of Grandt Line Camel wood doors. Oh, by the way,
> they had Duryea underframes. Here is what the model should look
like
> as built (see below). The big change for your era would be the
doors.
>
> http://www.steamfreightcars.com/calendar/2002/nap02/bm71968main.html
>

Ted,

What makes you think that all of B&M's 1923 Steel Design Boxcars had
Youngstown Doors when the photo of MTC #71999 with original "as built"
doors on page 27 of the NORTHERN NEW ENGLAND COLOR GUIDE was taken on
January 30, 1960?
Silly assumption. I did say I thought, not that they definitely had.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
100 14th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94402
info@...
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912



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Re: ICC Library Holdings at Denver

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

I said:
You must be thinking of the previous administration at the
DeGolyer. The folks currently in charge are friendly, helpful, and
eager to provide access.

Jerry Michels replied:
You may be right on that. It's been about five years since I was there doing
some research. Have they stopped making every photo copy on paper
pre-printed with red caution statement about use of the material?
Yep. In fact, it's like the days prior to the reign of former director David Farmer. He is a nice guy but had, shall we say, a slightly unhelpful style of operation.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Covered Hoppers Timeframe?

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Does the PS-2 covered hopper design fit into "steam freight cars" era?
Yes.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Usage fees

Jared Harper <harper-brown@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., James Mischke <jmischke@w...> wrote:

I have long appreciated photo collectors like Chuck Youngkurth,
Louis Marre,
Harold Vollrath, and Charles Winters, who are easy to get along
with, sell at a
reasonable price, and just want a free copy for their
publication. I could never
do that well with institutions, some of my projects would be
impossible without
such people.

I appreciate this also. Being a person who has researched and
written books the cost of getting copies of photos and then using
them in your publication can be prohibitive. I have limited the
use of photos from certain sources because of the costs. I realize
museums and libraries need to maintain their collections, but it
also needs to be kept in mind that most historical researchers do
not operate with big budgets. For people like me who do it as an
adjunct to their hobby it is even more true. Also, it is unlikely
we can recoup the expenses through the publication process. Writers
of railroad books do not get rich. We may be lucky to break even.
Our reward is knowing we have helped preserve part of the historical
record and what small measure of "fame" that might accrue.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


M&Stl

cmrp48 <rhleners@...>
 

If Clark Propst is a member of this group would you please contact me
off-line in regards to your M&StL RS-1 in the latest RMC.
Thank you.
Robert Leners


Re: DL&W canister gondolas

Brian Carlson
 

Blake, I have the FD&S article at home on these cars I'll look up the issue when I get home.

Brian Carlson

"Blake D. Tatar" <BDTatar@...> wrote:

Hi, new to the group. Does anyone have a good dead on (or close to)
side shot of one of the DL&W cement canister cars? This would be the
ones with the straight bottoms. I have a drawing from the DL&W
freight car diagram book but it is a reprint and did not copy well.





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Re: Covered Hoppers Timeframe?

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Fred Mitchell asked:
"Does the PS-2 covered hopper design fit into "steam freight cars"
era?"

Yes. The first cars appeared in 1953.


Ben Hom


misappropriated items

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., James Mischke <jmischke@w...> wrote:
Many archival institutions regard volunteers in low regard, as
grubby subprofessionals to be avoided. They also distrust
volunteers as a security risk. Especially those with an
agenda (that is, the collection contains something these volunteers
really want to look at and are willing to work for the
privilege.) . The good stuff will be stolen, these
institutions believe.

Unfortunately I think they are right in many instances. 20 years ago
I obtained a 1/4 inch mimeographed list of negatives from the PA
state RR museum. At the time the price for prints was a premium. 90%
of the prints were marginal at best. 1/3 were absolute garbage. It
looked like some one had picked over the collection and left the
culls.

Ed

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