Date   

Re: Barge Full of Boxcars

pieter_roos <pieter.roos@...>
 

In addition to the Walthers model, Master Creations is doing an older
wooden "Float" (prefered term to "barge" if it has tracks and carries
RR cars). The model appears to be a somewhat odd design with overhead
truss supports. I'm not sure how easy it would be to make a more
common wood float design from the kit.

http://www.master-creations.com/bargeco.htm

Pieter Roos

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Garth Groff <ggg9y@v...> wrote:
Bob and Jay,

The 2005 Walthers catalog lists their (Walthers') barge as a
discontinued model. If it interests you, now is the time to pick one
up.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff


Cotton Belt 46300-46399 auto cars

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

Does anybody have good photos of the Cotton Belt's 46300-46399 auto cars that they could share with me? These were 40' cars built in 1947 by Mt. Vernon.

Thank you.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
100 14th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94402
info@speedwitch.com
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912


Re: Santa Fe and PFE HO Undecorated Reefers

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Mar 23, 2005, at 9:27 AM, Andy Carlson wrote:

I also have remaining Pacific Fruit Express R-30-16
undecorated Reefer Kits, the Terry Wegmann/Red Caboose
collaboration.
Booooo! We want -18s! We want -18s!

Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
100 14th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94402
info@speedwitch.com
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912


Santa Fe and PFE HO Undecorated Reefers

Andy Carlson
 

I have recently received a shipment of INTERMOUNTAIN
RAILWAY CO's often hard to find HO ATSF Santa Fe
Undecorated Reefer Kits (Rr 32 and others). For the
"roll your own" enthusiasts among us I am offering
these for sale.

I also have remaining Pacific Fruit Express R-30-16
undecorated Reefer Kits, the Terry Wegmann/Red Caboose
collaboration.

The price for these are:

IM RR CO ATSF Undec ...........$10.00 ea
Wegmann/RC R-30-16 ...........$22.00 ea.

Shipping is $3.85 for up to 2 kits, add another $1.00
each additional kit (beyond 2). If interested, please
contact me off-list at < midcentury@sbcglobal.net >


Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Erie 10 panel high side gons with drop doors

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Brian J Carlson" <brian@b...> wrote:
I'm looking for some information on Erie 70 ton 10 panel high side
gondolas with drop doors. Does anyone know when these modifications
occurred, and know of photos of other cars in the series, either the
hopper version of tight bottom.

My recollection is that 750 cars were converted to conventional
hoppers in the 1930s and an equal amount received flat bottoms. I
have an article describing the conversion from the Erie employees
magazine (organization isn't my strong suit).

Photos of these cars in service are rare but I have a couple from
Chuck Yungkurth, including an end shot.

I have a nice photo taken by official Erie photographer John Long
showing a flat bottom car being loaded with the remains of a
corrugated iron building. Dan Biernacki has the negative and last I
heard he offered prints.

You may have a print from one of Chuck's negatives. I'm sure
Schuyler will be able to tell when he sees the print.

Ed


Re: 1957 Mason City shipments to Rath Packing in Waterloo, Iowa

Brian Chapman <cornbeltroute@...>
 

Clark, just reaffirming Howard's message. The ICRR and Waterloo RR
switched the Rath Packing plant.

I grew up in Waterloo and I have specific memories of WRR EMD
switchers doing most of the work on the east side of the plant. The
plant's west side included IC trackage that connected off the
passenger main, although IC also had access along the river from the
east side, too.

I have a recollection that the Waterloo RR was jointly owned by the
IC and the Rock Island, although at some point the Rock sold its
holding in the "belt line."

I've been working on a CAD drawing of Waterloo trackage, tracing the
four railroads on a scanned USGS topo map, each railroad's route
marked with a different color. With the Rath plant and, on the other
side of the river, the John Deere tractor plant (the world's largest
tractor plant, at least in the 1960s), I've got my boyhood town under
study for a possible layout.

The WRR switched Rath and John Deere; interchanged with the IC at
Rath and near the IC's division yard; interchanged with the Rock and
CGW at John Deere and also with the CGW at its east side Highland
Park yard. The CGW was the only Class I that interchanged with WRR,
IC and the Rock, slashing across both the east and west sides of
Waterloo.

Clark, if you want a copy of the USGS topo map of Waterloo with its
railroads, let me know.

-Brian

Brian Chapman
Cedar Rapids, Iowa

---


Re: Red Caboose Steel Side gondola

Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@...>
 

Thanks for the reference Garth & Ben
Rob Kirkham


Re: Well, that's a relief!

Robert Welsh <bobwelsh32971@...>
 

*rofl* I spit out half a mouthful of coffee when I
read this. I am not sure i ever did it from behind a
boxcar but I did it off an overpass into an empty
hopper on a moving NS train between Max Meadows and
Pulaski. Hope the train didn't have hidden cameras on
it or anything....


--- Peter Weiglin <omnibus@datatamers.com> wrote:
Don Smith hastily typed:

Hi Shawn, I think the boxcar peeing out from behind
the red Santa Fe
car is a Northhampton and Bath car.

= = =

How many of us have done that out from behind a box
car?

Peter Weiglin
San Mateo CA
(soon to be Amelia, OH)




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Re: Barge Full of Boxcars

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Matt Herson wrote:
"Second boxcar from left appears to be B&M."
http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/misc-b/btrr-b44amh.jpg

I agree. It appears to be a PS-1 from BM 75000-75749, built 1951.
And while we're at it, the PRR boxcar is a rebuilt X29, most likely
Class X29B or X29D. (The inset side sill is the giveaway that it's
not Class X43/X43A/X43B or X46. Car number or roof and end details
necessary to confirm this are not visible.)


Ben Hom


Well, that's a relief!

Peter Weiglin <omnibus@...>
 

Don Smith hastily typed:

Hi Shawn, I think the boxcar peeing out from behind the red Santa Fe
car is a Northhampton and Bath car.

= = =

How many of us have done that out from behind a box car?

Peter Weiglin
San Mateo CA
(soon to be Amelia, OH)


Re: Barge Full of Boxcars

MATT HERSON <npry2526@...>
 

List,

The tug is definitely Bush Terminal. See NY Harbor Railroads Vol. 1 page
121.

The tug and floats are on the Hudson River with Jersey City behind.
Photographer most likely on one of the railroad owned ferry boats operating between
lower Manhattan and Jersey City.

Second boxcar from left appears to be B&M.

Hope this helps.

Matt Herson


Re: Erie 10 panel high side gons with drop doors

Robert Welsh <bobwelsh32971@...>
 

I have a couple gons lettered for Erie, they were my
dad's. I don't know if they are Mantua or not, but
they are nice looking cars. My only complaint was that
both cars bore the same road number so I simply
renumbered one.

--- Dean Payne <deanpayne@netscape.com> wrote:

I was just discussing this car off-line with Ray
Breyer. The NEB&W
site says the MDC model is incorrect, not long or
tall enough, and
that the Mantua 10-panel gon is correct (if you can
stand the cast-on
grabs). However, the Mantua gon is not available
lettered for the
Erie, the only road that it is correct for! Perhaps
one could
replace the grabs while stripping the car to
repaint/decal.
Uh, sorry, I don't have any prototype info.
Dean Payne


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Brian J Carlson"
<brian@b...> wrote:
I'm looking for some information on Erie 70 ton 10
panel high side
gondolas with drop doors.

In the Train Shed Cyclopedia (No. 46) reprint of
the 1931 Car
Builders
Cyclopedia there is a builders photo of Erie
44,000. A 10 panel
high side
70-ton gon with 12 drop doors. I do not have an
ORER from the
1930's so I
don't know how many cars were in the original
series.

Jumping forward to the January 1955 ORER lists 3
series of car with
the same
dimensions as the 1931 entry
37002-37748, 303 cars, 4 hopper self clearing
44336, 1 car Flat bottom wood floor
45001-45599, 178 cars, Flat bottom steel floor
<Snip>
Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY




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Re: Red Caboose Steel Side gondola

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Garth Groff wrote:
"The Red Caboose prototypes were covered in several articles when
the models were released, notably in RMJ by Richard Hendrickson. I
can dig out Richard's article and check the date tonight if no one
else jumps in here."

Richard Hendrickson, "General Service Gondolas", Railmodel Journal,
March 2000.

http://index.mrmag.com/


Ben Hom


Re: Red Caboose Steel Side gondola

Garth Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Rob,

The Red Caboose prototypes were covered in several articles when the models were released, notably in RMJ by Richard Hendrickson. I can dig out Richard's article and check the date tonight if no one else jumps in here. Red Caboose has gone on to release some dubious prototypes (like the WP/TS/SN cars) since the articles were published. Caution is advised.

Once again I am lobbying Martin Loftin for a 46' GS car, and sent him information on the WP 1953 GATC cars. This design was also used by the D&RGW. If anyone else is interested, please drop Martin a note.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Rob Kirkham wrote:

Thanks Garth. That makes sense. I wonder if this car may have been analysed at some earlier time before STMFC got started?

Rob Kirkham


Re: Barge Full of Boxcars

Garth Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Bob and Jay,

The 2005 Walthers catalog lists their (Walthers') barge as a discontinued model. If it interests you, now is the time to pick one up.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Bob Webber wrote:

I thought at one time Sylvan had one, but now the only list coal barges:
http://www.isp.on.ca/Sylvan/ho-scaleproducts.htm
They do have tugs.

Not sure if they are workable into a NE harbor tug, but they should be a good foundation. Maybe the coal barge could be too (into a rail barge).

For those in the NE region, some of their cars are nice for the GTW, CN, CP interludes as well...

At 02:31 PM 3/22/2005, you wrote:



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Beckert, Shawn" <shawn.beckert@d...>
wrote:

List,

The latest bunch of photographs at the Fallen Flag web site
includes several freightcar pix from the late '50's and early
'60's. Here's one of a barge-load of cars somewhere in New York:

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/misc-b/btrr-b44amh.jpg
Does anyone have a reference source for plans for the barge or
similar rail car barges. Specifically, I am looking for the type
used in the 20s or 30s.

Jay Bingham
Pacific Palisades, CA


Re: Freight Car Wheels

Guy Wilber
 

In a message dated 3/22/05 9:50:59 AM Pacific Standard Time,
thompson@signaturepress.com writes:

<< Were substantial quantities of cast IRON wheels still being
made? Cast steel wheels came in during the 1930s and my understanding
was that by 1950 or so, had substantially displaced cast iron. >>

Tony,

The AAR membership vote (1956) in favor of banning the application of cast
iron wheels was nearly twice the number needed for passage. The rule change was
added to the next printed supplement which was most likely issued in August.
The only protests came from the wheel manufacturers organizations. Their
belief was that the iron wheels had progressed to an acceptable level of quality
to still be in use. I have no actual numbers, but AAR notes (6/1958) stated;
"During the last twelve months six cast iron wheel foundries have been
permanently closed in the United States and two have closed in Canada. This
represents very close to twenty-five percent of total capacity."

A.T. Kott notes the 1959 wheels...I can't find any extension of the rule
within my data though my 1957 books are not accesible at the moment. Bill Kelly
might have information (at hand). The real proof would be the required AAR
stampings on that wheel set. If those marks include an "X" they may have been
permitted under AAR guidelines for experimental wheels.

An interesting aside to the cast iron wheel revolves around the manufacture
of 70 ton wheels applied to covered hoppers of the 1950s. The failure rate was
substantial and initiated the first ban of cast iron wheels. Rule 3, w, 4,
was added in 1954; "Wheels, cast iron, 70 ton capacity, prohibited on covered
hopper cars built new or rebuilt on and after August 1, 1954, and on all cars
in interchange on and after January 1, 1956.

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Sparks, Nevada


Re: Pad printing (was Bowser lettering)

Thomas M. Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

Bill,

In other words, pad printing is the same as offset printing where the
image is transferred from the photo-etched aluminum plate to the rubber
blanket and then to the paper. The plate never touches the paper. I
worked for 4 years in offset printing before going on the railroad. It
is an interesting process, but is much more sophisticated now then when
I was in it. Continuous feed web presses were new then and we were
still using multiple unit sheet fed presses in the early '60s.

Tom Olsen
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479

Bill Schneider wrote:

Perhaps if any of our other manufacturer friends are lurking they can
comment on the "state of the art" in printing.....
Charlie Vlk

OK Charlie, I'll get drawn in here too.... :>)

First folks let's cover Pad Printing 101, and hopefully clarify a couple
points. Pad printing is a process that is used to decorate numerous items we
all use every day - from pens and razor handles to the climate control and
window buttons on our cars. Pad printing's biggest advantage to is its
ability to print on uneven surfaces.

If you think of pad printing as a high tech rubber stamp machine then you
won't be far off. An image is etched on a plate, ink is applied to the plate
and is swept from the plate leaving ink in the etched areas only. A silicone
rubber pad then comes down onto the plate, picks up the ink and transfers it
to the object being printed. Simple. (Notice that the pad itself is just a
smooth surface, there is no image in it as such. The image is on the plate,
the pad just serves as a transfer medium to get the ink to the object).

Multi color printing is done with multiple plates, one for each color. Each
color is printed individually, one on top of another.

The trick to keeping fine lettering (trust and repack data for example)
legible is in the clarity of the original artwork, the care in which the
plate is made, and the care with which the printing is done. Good plate
material will reproduce everything - including dust specs - so making sure
you start with high quality artwork is a must. The other two items (the
"care" parts) come down to the skill of the operator and his ability to set
up and monitor the process. Changes in temperature and humidity, for
example, can change the way an image is printing and unless the operator
compensates for this a job can go from gold to scrap in no time at all. If
this seems to imply that a skilled operator who cares about the finished
product is needed, you'd better believe it!

As for "Laser printing" - I agree that the process refers to artwork and
plate preparation only. There are some new systems on the market that use a
laser to directly etch a plate, but I have not tried these yet so can't
comment on them. Having seen one example I'm not sure that its any
improvement over the system we already use. With our current process we can
get down to about 1 point (approx 1" HO) lettering and keep it legible,
sometimes less.

Here are a couple web sites with some additional information for those that
want to know more. (Disclaimer - None of these sites has any affiliation
with Branchline or the equipment we use).

http://www.itwtranstech.com/Pages/how.html

http://mamero.homestead.com/PadPrinting.html (interesting process using
metallic inks to create circuit boards, but the process is identical)

http://www.monode.com/pad/pp05.htm

http://www.mortek.net/technology.htm (Cute animation!)


Bill Schneider
(Branchline Trains)





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Re: Erie 10 panel high side gons with drop doors

Ed Hawkins
 

On Tuesday, March 22, 2005, at 07:09 PM, Brian J Carlson wrote:

Does anyone have a 1958 or later ORER they could check for information
on
the longevity of the car class?
Brian,
The 1/59 ORER does not list 37002-37748 or 44336. There are 124 cars
listed in series 45004-45599.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Red Caboose Steel Side gondola

Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@...>
 

Thanks Garth. That makes sense. I wonder if this car may have been analysed at some earlier time before STMFC got started?

Rob Kirkham


Re: Erie 10 panel high side gons with drop doors

Dean Payne <deanpayne@...>
 

I was just discussing this car off-line with Ray Breyer. The NEB&W
site says the MDC model is incorrect, not long or tall enough, and
that the Mantua 10-panel gon is correct (if you can stand the cast-on
grabs). However, the Mantua gon is not available lettered for the
Erie, the only road that it is correct for! Perhaps one could
replace the grabs while stripping the car to repaint/decal.
Uh, sorry, I don't have any prototype info.
Dean Payne


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Brian J Carlson" <brian@b...> wrote:
I'm looking for some information on Erie 70 ton 10 panel high side
gondolas with drop doors.

In the Train Shed Cyclopedia (No. 46) reprint of the 1931 Car
Builders
Cyclopedia there is a builders photo of Erie 44,000. A 10 panel
high side
70-ton gon with 12 drop doors. I do not have an ORER from the
1930's so I
don't know how many cars were in the original series.

Jumping forward to the January 1955 ORER lists 3 series of car with
the same
dimensions as the 1931 entry
37002-37748, 303 cars, 4 hopper self clearing
44336, 1 car Flat bottom wood floor
45001-45599, 178 cars, Flat bottom steel floor
<Snip>
Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

149961 - 149980 of 189707