Date   

PRR colors

Bill Lane <billlane@...>
 

Hi All,

Does anyone know what the RGB values are for PRR Tuscan, and/or Oxide Red?
Please reply ASAP. We are getting business cards printed now.

Thank You,
Bill Lane

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy in S Scale in 1957

See my finished models at:
http://www.lanestrains.com

Importing a Brass S Scale PRR X29
http://www.pennsysmodels.com
ALL of the production cars have arrived as of 6-30-05

***Join the PRR T&HS***
The other members are not ALL like me!
http://www.prrths.com


Re: Slightly off topic (Road construction)

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

I would assume that road construction progress was related to which state
you are interested in. I have a circa 1925 AAA map of California from
Sacramento to Fresno (...showing all routes to Yosemite) and the main
highway (Highway 99) was paved and a portion of some feeder highways into
the Sierra foothills but little else. A new highway completed in 1926 which
paralleled the Yosemite Valley Railroad (and helped bring around its demise)
was built new as a gravel road. (They used a lot of tailings from the nearby
mines and the tailings were full of spikes and nails....so many that
automobiles were getting four flats at a time. They finally had to drag a
large magnet along the route to get the nails out of the gravel.) I would
image that the mileage of paved roads within towns along the route was
higher but still not significant.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Re: PRR colors

Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton <smokeandsteam@...>
 

Bill

You can’t really relate paint to precise RGB values – they have
completely different colour spaces. However, try 145,20,17 for what
seems like a good approximation to Pennsy Tuscan. If your print shop
wants a Pantone reference try 7427 which is as close as I can get on
this set up.

Aidrian

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Bill Lane
Sent: Monday, July 11, 2005 7:04 PM
To: PRR Fax; PRR Modeling; Steam Era Freight cars
Subject: [STMFC] PRR colors

Hi All,

Does anyone know what the RGB values are for PRR Tuscan, and/or Oxide
Red?
Please reply ASAP. We are getting business cards printed now.



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SAL Round-Roof Box Car Project Announcement

John Degnan <RailScaler@...>
 

For those of you who haven't already heard, an effort is underway to produce an S scale model of Seaboard Air Line's 19000-19499 Series, B-7 Class 40' Single-Door "Round-Roof" (also known as "Turtlebacks") box cars. Information on this project can be found on the following web-page :

http://www.trainweb.org/seaboard/SALRoundRoofBoxCarProject.htm

Please contact me off-line if interested.

Thanks.

John Degnan
RailScaler@...
Seaboard Air Line Information Collective And Photo Archive
http://www.trainweb.org/seaboard


Re: Canadian open hoppers in USA

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Max Carey wrote:

I am guessing that a lot of coal moved from the USA into Canada by
rail during the steam era, and it seems reasonable that some of it may
have moved on hoppers of Canadian railroads. However, I can't recall
ever actually seeing a Canadian hopper in the States back then. I would
appreciate information on the subject, including specifics on the
names of the Canadian roads and the kinds of cargo.
Max,

You are correct about coal moving from the US into Canada. It moved both by all-rail and via colliers or barges across the Great Lakes (I am not aware of any US Coal entering Canada via the St. Lawrence).

The percentages of coal hoppers-owned by booth the CN and CPR were quite low (4,825 hoppers out of a total 101,189 revenue freight cars as per the 4/55 ORER for the CN, and 4,307 hoppers of the total 74,483 revenue cars on the CPR).

Unless there were severe hopper shortages in the US, there may have been problems with US Customs in having Canadian Hoppers cross the border southbound empty - US Customs could have imposed a duty upon those hoppers. Therefore, almost every Canadian hopper appearing in the US had to have crossed the border southbound loaded.

Tim Gilbert


Re: Live Poultry Cars

proto48er
 

--- In STMFC@..., "rrhistorian" <rrhistorian@h...> wrote:
Hello all,

Does anybody know if any of these cars survive in any form? Perhaps
as a stationary chicken coop somewhere?
Yes, there is one at the National Museum of Transport in St Louis.
A.T. Kott


Canadian open hoppers in USA

okiemax <northtowner@...>
 

I am guessing that a lot of coal moved from the USA into Canada by
rail during the steam era, and it seems reasonable that some of it may
have moved on hoppers of Canadian railroads. However, I can't recall
ever actually seeing a Canadian hopper in the States back then. I would
appreciate information on the subject, including specifics on the
names of the Canadian roads and the kinds of cargo.

Thanks,

Max Carey


Slightly off topic (Road construction)

Milepost 131 <mp131@...>
 

I was watching the History channel the other day and saw the Lincoln Highway
right after WWI. I'm not sure the word HIGHWAY should have been applied. IKE
was with the army convoy that went from East Coast to West after WWI. No
wonder he pushed the Federal Highway projects when he was President!

My question is how best to MODEL highways in various parts of the STEAM
FREIGHT CAR era?

It looks like in urban areas you could get away with brick and concrete but
the rural roads would be more correct with ruts and crushed stone. Ashphalt
seems to have been a bit later. AS far as the smooth "Autobahn" roads
anything before late 30's is wrong (even then they were few and far between
and in places like PA and NJ. In the real rural areas the idea of tar and
gravel probably early 50's. No wonder folks loved railroads back then!

How are folks on the list doing roads (when you're not building "ultimate"
freigt cars?

Any good sources of photos and details?

Gordon Andrews


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Re: Digest Number 2540

asychis@...
 

In a message dated 7/11/2005 7:56:42 PM Central Standard Time,
STMFC@... writes:

Discussions about frt cars built within our time period as they existed and
operated after our time period are not strictly forbidden but they should be
kept to a minimum. The point is...this group by definition...is about frt
cars of the steam period. Venturing outside of our time period takes us out
of the steam era and, thus, defeats the purpose of the group.



So Mike, will you specifically rule on the BAR reefers? I'd like to see the
discussion continue, but is this off limits?

Jerry Michels


Re: sheet lead for weights

Roger Robar <rrobar@...>
 

Andy,
Another good source for sheet lead is from a roofing company. They often
have left over small pieces/scraps from roofing jobs. These can usually be
purchased for little or no cost. A few lbs. will last a 'life time' to weigh
your 40's/50's era freight cars.
Roger Robar - Modeling the B&M

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]On Behalf Of
Andy Sperandeo
Subject: RE: [STMFC] sheet lead for weights


A member of this list left me a phone message asking where I purchase
sheet lead for additional weight in freight cars (and other models). For the
last several years I've been ordering lead sheet from Small Parts Inc.,
www.smallparts.com, a supplier with lots of other stuff that modelers and
layout builders might find useful.

Small Parts Inc. offers .040" and .062" lead sheets in 3" x 6", 6" x 12",
and 12" x 12" sizes. (The company also has lead bricks in case your DCC
power supply needs more shielding!)

Sheet lead is easy to cut with tin snips, metal shears, or even a utility
knife and a steel rule. Latex adhesive caulk seems to be a pretty secure way
to glue it to the floor of a car.

so long,

Andy

Andy Sperandeo
Executive Editor
Model Railroader magazine
asperandeo@...
Phone: 262-796-8776, ex. 461
Fax: 262-796-1142
www.modelrailroader.com







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Re: Prototype needed for oddball C&BT 40' 12 panel boxcar

Ed Hawkins
 

On Sunday, July 10, 2005, at 06:40 PM, stefanelaine wrote:

I came across this oddball C&BT boxcar in my pile of older cars and
was wondering if there is a prototype for this arrangement:

10'6'height, 4/4 Improved Dreadnaught ends(rolling pin), 12 panel
sides, 8 foot Superior door with 7 panels, rectangular panel roof

What the heck was I thinking when I picked this one up?

Any help would be appreciated!
Stefan Lerché
Duncan, BC
Stefan,
Perhaps the more appropriate question is what was C&BT Shops thinking
of when they produced this kit? They mixed and matched all of their
styles of roofs, ends, and sides in hopes that each combination matched
one or more prototype cars. Not quite! They were planning on doing the
same thing with a line of 50' box cars, but thank goodness they never
materialized.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


MKT Reefer

Jonathan MARCUS
 

In my quest for some O scale Chooch resin models a number of you have kindly contacted
me with unwanted kits. One of the models that has been offered for sale is an
MKT (Missouri-Kansas-Texas) assigned car owned by GARX (General American
Refrigerator Transit). Is this the same as the ART car that Chooch offered recently?
Can anyone tell me what these looked like and what time-period they are appropriate for.
(I'm looking at circa 1948).
Many thank
Jon Marcus.


Re: sheet lead for weights

Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...>
 

A member of this list left me a phone message asking where I purchase sheet lead for additional weight in freight cars (and other models). For the last several years I've been ordering lead sheet from Small Parts Inc., www.smallparts.com, a supplier with lots of other stuff that modelers and layout builders might find useful.

Small Parts Inc. offers .040" and .062" lead sheets in 3" x 6", 6" x 12", and 12" x 12" sizes. (The company also has lead bricks in case your DCC power supply needs more shielding!)

Sheet lead is easy to cut with tin snips, metal shears, or even a utility knife and a steel rule. Latex adhesive caulk seems to be a pretty secure way to glue it to the floor of a car.

so long,

Andy

Andy Sperandeo
Executive Editor
Model Railroader magazine
asperandeo@...
Phone: 262-796-8776, ex. 461
Fax: 262-796-1142
www.modelrailroader.com


Re: chemical tank cars in the 1950s

Shawn Beckert
 

Matt asked:

if we have a Pulp mill in the South East would it
receive chemicals in the 8 or 10, 000 tank cars or the 11,000 ones
with smaller domes and / or platforms?
A kraft pulp and paper-making industry would use both non-pressure
8k and 10k tank cars for delivering caustic soda to the mill, and
11k pressure cars for delivering chlorine. Both chemicals are used
in the pulp and paper business. The web site listed below doesn't
specifically talk about pulp mills of the 1950's, but I'd guess the
process hasn't changed all that much, except as regards the number
of people screaming about the environmental pollution involved:

http://www.rfu.org/KraftPulp.htm


Hope this helps,

Shawn Beckert


chemical tank cars in the 1950s

matt
 

Guys,

Can anyone tell me what type and size of tank cars were primarily used
in the 1950s to transport chemicals?

for example, if we have a Pulp mill in the South East would it
receive chemicals in the 8 or 10, 000 tank cars or the 11,000 ones
with smaller domes and / or platforms?

which chemical tank cars were the most commmonly seen in the South
East in the 1950s?

thanks in advance

MATT


Re: BAR R40-10 Reefer

Tom Jones III <tomtherailnut@...>
 

Thank you, Ted. I stand corrected. I believe I must have had the R-40-25 on
my mind . . . .

Tom Jones III

----- Original Message -----

On Jul 11, 2005, at 12:06 PM, Tom Jones III wrote:

I am a bit confused. The R-40-10 PFE reefer was originally built
around 1948
into1950, within the STMFC timeline. SNIP
Just a clarification on the build dates for the R-40-10 - 1936-1937.

Regards,
Ted Culotta


Scanner help

Garth Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Friends,

I recently acquired a used Nikon Coolscan II to work up some of my railroad slides (mandatory freight car content) using an old SCSI Mac. Unfortunately, the scanner didn't come with driver software. I tried to download the driver from the Nikon web site, but because I use a Peecee at work for all my web stuff, the file is converted to that format, and my Mac won't recognize it. Nor can I open the .sit file.

Is there anyone out there who has the driver disk and would be willing to burn a copy, or loan me an original? The software should be same for Coolscan II LS-20, Super Coolscan LS-1000, LS-4500 MultiFormat, and Scantouch AX-110 and AX-210 models, all SCSI machines. I am running OS 8.5 on the Mac, but a disk for 8.6 should work as well (current version). I would be quite happy to pay postage (both ways in case of a loan), the cost of a disk, etc., or will swap a couple of interesting photos.

If anyone here can help, please meet me on private e-mail at ggg9y@... .

Thank much.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff


ADMIN: Years of Discussion for the STMFC

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Let me try to give guidance to within scope issues with respect to the time span of discussions on the STMFC. The time period covered is, indeed, 1900-1960. The end date is an arbitrary time which pretty much coincides with the end of mainline steam operations in the US and probably North America. Like many subjects covered by the STMFC, matters that occurred either before or after our specified time period are not absolutely forbidden from discussions within the group IF they are associated with frt cars of our time period. Thus, comments about discovering a completely pristine Northern Pacific DS box car in the deep woods near Glacier National Park last week or the remains of an H2a N&W hopper near Buford, WY, back in May would not be out of scope. Discussion about a UP flat car built in 1961 or later or, indeed, an N&W H12a hopper found in downtown Berkely, CA, in 1962 would be out of scope. A pity, actually, since the H12a wasn't built until 1981. Oh well...rules are rules after all...

Discussions about frt cars built within our time period as they existed and operated after our time period are not strictly forbidden but they should be kept to a minimum. The point is...this group by definition...is about frt cars of the steam period. Venturing outside of our time period takes us out of the steam era and, thus, defeats the purpose of the group.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: McKean 40' PS-1 combo door box car

Mark Heiden
 

Hi Bill,

According to the NEB&W website, 40' PS-1 boxcars were still in
production after 1966. In 1966 Atlantic Coast Line received 800
cars, in 1967 Seaboard Coast Line received 950 cars, and in 1968,
the final year listed for 40' PS-1 construction, the Milwaukee
received 25 cars. However, all of these cars were built with single
doors.

The Milwaukee did have 40' PS-1s with combination doors, series
29000-29499, 500 cars built 1958. A solid side sill ran the length
of the car, with a drop section spanning from bolster to bolster. I
couldn't find a reference to such a Rock Island car.

Unfortunately, I don't think there is a ready prototype for your
car, but side sills can be modified with strip styrene.

Mark Heiden

--- In STMFC@..., "Bill McCoy" <bugsy451@c...> wrote:
I picked up a McKean Master Series undecorated 40' PS-1
combination
plug and sliding door box car kit in April. The car has an 8'
youmgstown silding door and a 7' smooth riveted plug door. There
are
cast on door stops for the plug and sliding door and complete 15'
door tracks. The sides are welded. The ends are 5-4 with the small
horizontal rib at the top and the 6 vertical ribs below the roof
walk. It has the riveted seam between the upper and lower end
halves. The roof is the PS-1 roof but with out roofwalk supports
which may make this car too modern for this group but it's hard to
imagine a 40' box after 1966 when roofwalks started dissapearing
from new cars. The side sills tabs appear to be PS-1 at the
bolsters
and there is a side sill reinforcement running the length of the
15'
door opening.

A couple of months ago I posted to the group and got a number of
responses but still didn't get an exact match for the car so I'm
trying again. The Milwaukee and Rock Island were close but still
have differences in side sill detail and I believe are ACF cars.

Thanks in advance for any help identifying this car.

Bill McCoy
Jax


Re: BAR R40-10 Reefer

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Jul 11, 2005, at 12:06 PM, Tom Jones III wrote:

I am a bit confused. The R-40-10 PFE reefer was originally built around 1948
into1950, within the STMFC timeline. That they had careers that took them
into the Diesel age should not preclude their discussion here, should it? I
am just trying to clarify what is "on topic" and what is "off topic". Thank
you.
Just a clarification on the build dates for the R-40-10 - 1936-1937.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
645 Tanner Marsh Road, Guilford, CT 06437
info@...
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912

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