Date   

Re: Refrigerator Car Brine Holding Tanks

mcindoefalls
 

In the days of ice refrigerator cars, dripping brine on the rails
posed a significant maintenance issue to the railroads. The salt
caused corrosion of track and track components.

Regards
Bruce
Not to mention the corrosion of bridges!

Walt Lankenau


Florida reefers was More From the Florida Archives.

Bruce Smith <smithbf@...>
 

On Jul 27, 2005, at 11:37 AM, Brian J Carlson wrote:


word of caution on the PFE reefer. The photo does not show direct evidence
the car is being loaded like the other two (BREX and MDT). It only shows a
produce truck in front of the reefer. Are there other photo's on the site
that show the car being loaded. I realize I may be nit-picking.
You are <G>. I would be VERY curious to know of a circumstance whereby fresh produce was shipped TO florida <VBG>. Especially in 1928.

BTW, for more reefers see:

ART, 1946, http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/commerce/c005105.jpg

FGEX, 1943, http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/spottswood/sp02183.jpg

URTX, 195?, http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/general/n038716.jpg


Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin
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Corrosion Maintenance (Was Brine Holding Tanks)

Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

Bruce Smith wote:

In the days of ice refrigerator cars, dripping brine on the rails
posed a significant maintenance issue to the railroads. The salt
caused corrosion of track and track components. Many railroads had
cars designed to spray oil on the track to protect them from the
brine. This is an aspect of Steam Era railroading that I have yet
to see modeled by anyone.
For me this raises the question, did any of the western railroads have
"cars designed to spray oil on the track to protect them from the
brine"?

Bob Chaparro
Mission Viejo, CA


Wabash #8000-8299 series boxcars #8000-8299

oliver
 

Posted this message to the Wabash list, but did not receive a
response: I'd like to letter a Wabash #8000-8299 series 10'6" 40' DD
boxar for the early - mid 1950s using CDs dry trnasfers. Does anyone
have a photo of one of these cars? Black roof? Ends? Any idea if wood
or steel running board? Type of trucks?

Any help would be greatly appreciated
Stefan Lerché
Duncan, BC


Re: More From the Florida Archives.

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

word of caution on the PFE reefer. The photo does not show direct evidence
the car is being loaded like the other two (BREX and MDT). It only shows a
produce truck in front of the reefer. Are there other photo's on the site
that show the car being loaded. I realize I may be nit-picking.

Brian Carlson

that On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 10:36:08 -0500, Bruce Smith wrote
On Jul 27, 2005, at 10:03 AM, Mike Aufderheide wrote:

Thanks to whoever posted the Florida archive photo.
These sites are always interesting! I dug around and
found several other shots of interest for the list:

Loading Florida(!) potatoes, 1947:
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/commerce/c006422.jpg
BREX 75767

Cucumbers, 1947:
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/commerce/c008278.jpg
MDT
Veggies, 1928:
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/prints/pr00028.jpg
PFE 15110 A PFE reefer! How could you post that? Don't you know
that loaded PFE reefers only ran left to right!! Oh the humanity!
I think a warning label might have been in order as some list
members may be unduly shocked by seeing that photograph ;^)

Of course, I LOVE it as it supports a mix of reefers hauling Florida
produce north, which would have included PFE, MDT, and FGE/BRE/WFE
(although that PFE date of 1928 is quite a bit earlier than the
other two)

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" -
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Re: CA as gap filler.

John Swanson <dwlscbq@...>
 

A friend is into plastic car modeling / modification. (to the point where the doors, roof, trunk, and so on work on properly modeled hinges; motors are completely "wired", and so on. Just plain craftsmanship)
At any rate one of their tricks is to place baking powder or soda into the area to be filled and add CA. It hardens very fast and can be quickly worked.
As always, experiment on something that will not be missed.

Another thing I learned from the real master diesel models is that they never try to fill any large area with putty. They ALWAYS take the time to fill as much as possible with pieces of styrene, Evergreen strip styrene cut to fit and glued in place and so on.
It seems that anything beyond filling small gaps and cracks leaves the putty shrinking with time.
Another trick I picked up is to place Squadron putty (I near always use Green Putty) on a piece of around .020 styrene and wipe it into the area to be filled. This fills the area under pressure so it fills nicely and leaves little sanding. Any additional filling needed can be easily seen as it dries. After doing it for some time I am amazed at the control it can give when filling.
Gad even a bald headed ole timer can learn.

John Swanson


Re: Burlington wagonwheel antennas

Charlie Vlk
 

Sorry for continuing the off-list content, but....
If anyone has a drawing or detail photos of the Wagonwheel antennas as
applied to CB&Q equipment
it would be a good thing to get in contact with me off list......
It is the intent of Broadway Limited to tool up road-specific details for
their F7 and F3 locomotive series.
I have provided sketch drawings for a wagon wheel antenna but there is still
time to include better information.
Charlie Vlk
Railroad Model Resources/
Broadway Limited


Re: More From the Florida Archives.

Bruce Smith <smithbf@...>
 

On Jul 27, 2005, at 10:03 AM, Mike Aufderheide wrote:

Thanks to whoever posted the Florida archive photo.
These sites are always interesting! I dug around and
found several other shots of interest for the list:

Loading Florida(!) potatoes, 1947:
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/commerce/c006422.jpg
BREX 75767

Cucumbers, 1947:
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/commerce/c008278.jpg
MDT
Veggies, 1928:
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/prints/pr00028.jpg
PFE 15110 A PFE reefer! How could you post that? Don't you know that loaded PFE reefers only ran left to right!! Oh the humanity! I think a warning label might have been in order as some list members may be unduly shocked by seeing that photograph ;^)

Of course, I LOVE it as it supports a mix of reefers hauling Florida produce north, which would have included PFE, MDT, and FGE/BRE/WFE (although that PFE date of 1928 is quite a bit earlier than the other two)

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
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Re: More From the Florida Archives.

Miller,Andrew S. <asmiller@...>
 

Florida and not a FGE car among them. BREX (close), MDT, and PFE.

regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Mike Aufderheide
Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2005 11:03 AM
To: Steam Freight Car
Subject: [STMFC] More From the Florida Archives.

Thanks to whoever posted the Florida archive photo.
These sites are always interesting! I dug around and
found several other shots of interest for the list:

Loading Florida(!) potatoes, 1947:

http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/commerce/c006422.jpg

Cucumbers, 1947:

http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/commerce/c008278.jpg

Pulpwood, n.d.:

http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/reference/rc12382.jpg

More pulpwood, 1956:

http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/commerce/c024087.jpg

Veggies, 1928:

http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/prints/pr00028.jpg

Regards,

Mike Aufderheide
Chicago

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More From the Florida Archives.

Michael Aufderheide
 

Thanks to whoever posted the Florida archive photo.
These sites are always interesting! I dug around and
found several other shots of interest for the list:

Loading Florida(!) potatoes, 1947:

http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/commerce/c006422.jpg

Cucumbers, 1947:

http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/commerce/c008278.jpg

Pulpwood, n.d.:

http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/reference/rc12382.jpg

More pulpwood, 1956:

http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/commerce/c024087.jpg

Veggies, 1928:

http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/prints/pr00028.jpg

Regards,

Mike Aufderheide
Chicago

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Re: Refrigerator Car Brine Holding Tanks

Bruce Smith <smithbf@...>
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:
My question is, were such brine tanks ever required for RS reefers in
produce service?
Tony Thompson Replied:
No, although salt was used for rapid cooling of fresh produce and
to attain low temperatures for frozen food. Drain outlets in an RS
could be closed, but the capacity of a bunker bottom was not close to
equalling the entire bunker load of ice, so one didn't lightly close
the drains; you could flood the cargo.
In the days of ice refrigerator cars, dripping brine on the rails posed a significant maintenance issue to the railroads. The salt caused corrosion of track and track components. Many railroads had cars designed to spray oil on the track to protect them from the brine. This is an aspect of Steam Era railroading that I have yet to see modeled by anyone.


Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Re: Using CA as gap filler

Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton <smokeandsteam@...>
 

Baking soda has one nasty disadvantage it takes up water from the
atmosphere and swells. In some cases the swelling is enough to split the
CA apart, and that usually happens a few weeks or months after you have
finished painting and decaling.

Aidrian

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Bob Webber

What I have used in the past is baking soda and CA.

_____


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Re: Strange stock car (was: Florida photo archives)

Tom Jones III <tomtherailnut@...>
 

2nd Reply:

Well, looked again, and I think my previous post was WRONG! It certainly
appears that the door post is attached to the car. You guys explain it to me
later . . . ..

Tom Jones III

----- Original Message -----
Subject: Re: Strange stock car (was: [STMFC] Florida photo archives)


O.K. I have finally really taken a lot of time to look at this, and to
"logic" it out.

The "door post" is actually part of the loading dock. Note the plywood
sheets are tied to it, and the slats that appear to be in the car doorway
are actually afixed to the post. That makes it less likely that this car
was
used to transport the cows.

At the top of the post, what appears to be an attachment to the car I
believe is actually just the top of the post accidentally juxtaposed in
the
photo in such a way that it looks to be part of the car. There is a little
"bracket" that seems to tie it to the car on the right side of the post -
I
think that is just part of the car, perhaps where the doors come together.
That would make the car a double door car. But, at the bottom of the post,
it is really clear that it is part of the loading dock, not the car.

This makes the boxcar more likely either a demonstration, a place to get
the
cows off another airplane, or simply a car on one track being used as a
"bridge" from another car on another track. I doubt cows were shipped in
this boxcar.

Still a very cool picture!

Tom Jones

----- Original Message -----
Subject: RE: Strange stock car (was: [STMFC] Florida photo archives)


Or is that a double door car with a wood post in the middle and slats
across the lower part of the doorway?

Doug Brown


-----Original Message-----
Subject: Strange stock car (was: [STMFC] Florida photo archives)
From the referenced site:
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/reference/rc15237.jpg

Note the Wabash box car with half of its side sheathing removed for use
as a stock car.
<snip>



Yahoo! Groups Links






Re: Strange stock car (was: Florida photo archives)

Tom Jones III <tomtherailnut@...>
 

O.K. I have finally really taken a lot of time to look at this, and to
"logic" it out.

The "door post" is actually part of the loading dock. Note the plywood
sheets are tied to it, and the slats that appear to be in the car doorway
are actually afixed to the post. That makes it less likely that this car was
used to transport the cows.

At the top of the post, what appears to be an attachment to the car I
believe is actually just the top of the post accidentally juxtaposed in the
photo in such a way that it looks to be part of the car. There is a little
"bracket" that seems to tie it to the car on the right side of the post - I
think that is just part of the car, perhaps where the doors come together.
That would make the car a double door car. But, at the bottom of the post,
it is really clear that it is part of the loading dock, not the car.

This makes the boxcar more likely either a demonstration, a place to get the
cows off another airplane, or simply a car on one track being used as a
"bridge" from another car on another track. I doubt cows were shipped in
this boxcar.

Still a very cool picture!

Tom Jones

----- Original Message -----
Subject: RE: Strange stock car (was: [STMFC] Florida photo archives)


Or is that a double door car with a wood post in the middle and slats
across the lower part of the doorway?

Doug Brown


-----Original Message-----
Subject: Strange stock car (was: [STMFC] Florida photo archives)
From the referenced site:
http://fpc.dos.state.fl.us/reference/rc15237.jpg

Note the Wabash box car with half of its side sheathing removed for use
as a stock car.
<snip>


Re: Burlington wagonwheel antennas

Rob & Bev Manley
 

Ive uploaded a shot of the antenna in STMPF / Rob's Fodoz.
It is a JM Gruber photo and he sells at Naperville.
Notice the angle brace, the antenna wire and the lack of a flanged cap at the top of the mast.
Rob Manley

----- Original Message -----
From: robev1630@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2005 10:29 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Burlington wagonwheel antennas


Scott,
The DA antenna could be reinforced with a drizzle of 5 min Epoxy but this has only been a theory of mine and never actually done. I use the OIverland part and ground off the top brass turning to look like an inverted top hat. This resembles the appliance as seen on p.15 engine # 9201 in Burington Route ColorPictorial Vol 2.. The OVL part is stronger, made of Stainless steel and will take a beating. As far as spoke correctness there are far more important things to worry about in the modeling world. Are you going to scratch the cab window defroster?
Sincerely,
Rob Manley
Midwest Mod-U-Trak

"When building kits is a lost art,
Only lost artists will be building kits !!"
----- Original Message -----
From: blindog@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2005 4:14 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Burlington wagonwheel antennas


Detail Associates makes the SP-style wagonwheel antenna for cabooses, but the Burlington used a different antenna with a thick center pole, for lack of a better description. Overland made a wagonwheel antenna but what the Burlington used had twice as many spokes. The DA etched brass part looks awful fragile. Has anyone on the list tackled this problem? I want a reasonably durable wagonwheel for my C&S SW7.

Scott C



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Re: Refrigerator Car Brine Holding Tanks

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:
Railroads sometimes added salt to the ice in ice bunker refrigerator
cars to achieve lower load temperatures.
Well, no, it was shippers who added initial salt and who specified what the icing deck crews did. In this kind of shipping, railroads or icing companies did what they were told.

John H. White's book, The
Great Yellow Fleet, mentions on Page 106 that "brine tanks to catch
and hold the discharge were required on cars used in interchange
service". The previous paragraph in the book implies he is discussing
refrigerator cars used for meat and frozen foods.
My question is, were such brine tanks ever required for RS reefers in
produce service?
No, although salt was used for rapid cooling of fresh produce and to attain low temperatures for frozen food. Drain outlets in an RS could be closed, but the capacity of a bunker bottom was not close to equalling the entire bunker load of ice, so one didn't lightly close the drains; you could flood the cargo.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Refrigerator Car Brine Holding Tanks

Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

Railroads sometimes added salt to the ice in ice bunker refrigerator
cars to achieve lower load temperatures. John H. White's book, The
Great Yellow Fleet, mentions on Page 106 that "brine tanks to catch
and hold the discharge were required on cars used in interchange
service". The previous paragraph in the book implies he is discussing
refrigerator cars used for meat and frozen foods.

My question is, were such brine tanks ever required for RS reefers in
produce service?

Bob Chaparro
Mission Viejo, CA


Re: an awesome web site!

Rob & Bev Manley
 

I got the link from our teen member Andrew. It is better than the others I've been on. I was tracing the Q's city job at 18th and Sangamon in Chicago for my home layout.
Rob Manley

----- Original Message -----
From: cf5250
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2005 1:36 PM
Subject: [STMFC] an awesome web site!



www.virtualearth.com

Not -directly- freight car related, but it may help answer
a lot of geography questions... You can zoom in with photos
well enough to recognize buildings, yards, rights of way,
etc. I think I even saw Mike Brock in one of the photos...

Tim O'Connor





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Re: an awesome web site!

Fred in Vt. <pennsy@...>
 

Tim,

Was he the one in handcuffs, and having his camera impounded by Homeland Security at the Amtrak station in Miami? Thought that was the shot CNN had too.

Fred F <LOL>

----- Original Message -----
From: cf5250
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2005 2:36 PM
Subject: [STMFC] an awesome web site!



www.virtualearth.com

Not -directly- freight car related, but it may help answer
a lot of geography questions... You can zoom in with photos
well enough to recognize buildings, yards, rights of way,
etc. I think I even saw Mike Brock in one of the photos...

Tim O'Connor





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Re: B & O Lettering on Red Caboose HO M-26 Boxcar

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

It should be pointed out the M-26D had Duryea underframes so the Red Caboose
car is off in this respect.
Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

----- Original Message -----
From: "bdg1210" <Bruce_Griffin@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2005 11:08 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: B & O Lettering on Red Caboose HO M-26 Boxcar


Matt,

According to research by Dr. Chris Barkan distributed by the B&ORRHS,
the B&O started using the large B&O (with small ampersand) in Mid 1955
on boxcars. This lasted until Late 1957. The large B&O was on the
left side of the car above the road numbers and the right side had the
words "Baltimore & Ohio" spelled out above the "Linking 13 Great
States" logo. From 1957 to 1962 the scheme was similar but changed by
adding a small B&O just above the road number and replacing the 13
states logo with with either "Time-Saver Service" or "Sentinel Service"
logos. After Mid 1962, the right side of the scheme was simplified to
only the simple "Capitol Dome" logo.

This was different to what happened on hoppers. The large B&O with a
large ampersand was started in Mid 1953 and then modified in 1956 when
the smaller ampersand was used.

Regards,
Bruce D. Griffin

--- In STMFC@..., "matthewjstrickland"
<matthewjstrickland@y...> wrote:
Hi Guys,

Can anyone tell me when the Baltimore and Ohio started using the
Big,
Capital " B & O" lettering on their cars. I know nothing about the B
&
O but think it is known as Billboard lettering?

It can be seen on the new release by Red Caboose HO scale MD26
boxcar.

Can anyone also tell me in service dates for this car as modelled by
Red Caboose?

thanks as always for time and expertise

MATT




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