Date   

Re: mixing of meat and produce reefers

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jul 28, 2005, at 8:48 AM, ed_mines wrote:

Were meat reefers ever used for produce, particiularly in the '40s?
I'm reluctant to say never, Ed, but if done at all, it would have been very rarely and only on an emergency basis. Meat reefers were specially equipped for meat service with meat rails, floor racks, brine retaining tanks, etc. and thus were not really suitable for produce shipments.


Re: Asparagus and Peaches in SC

Carrock1998@...
 

Thanks Tom--now I know roughly where you are talking about---I know it by the
Route 31 number. Thanks.

Robert "Rocky" Jackson

In a message dated 7/28/2005 4:45:23 PM Central Standard Time,
tgmadden@... writes:
Tom---the Oxford you refer to was it in Pennsylvania or was it in
New Jersey?

Oxford Furnace, NJ, a few miles north of Washington NJ on the old main
line. It's on Route 31, which used to be Route 69 until the late '60s
when the local classes of '69 coupled with the sexual connotations of
that number caused the highway signs to disappear faster than they
could be replaced. Route 69/31 ends at the junction with Route 46 at
Butzville, where there was a three-level crossing of the DL&W bridging
the L&HR which itself bridged what I'm remembering was the Pequest
river.

Tom Madden


Re: Devcon Epoxy (was Using CA as a gap filler)

Tim O'Connor
 

Andy, how do you measure the stuff with such precision? Do
you have a scale, or do you do it by volume? I wonder if the
50:50 ratio works by weight but not volume, or vice versa?

Tim O.

I would again caution against mixing 50:50. I suggest
55:45 White to cream hardener, or a rubbery expoxy
will result.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Cal-Scale Express Reefer Underframe Detail Kit

Bruce Smith <smithbf@...>
 

On Jul 28, 2005, at 10:56 AM, phrwy wrote:

Some years ago this detail kit consisting of parts and an
installation drawing was available, but I have not seen it for a long
time. What I am seeking is a copy of the drawing sheet that came in
the kit. Could someone please scan a copy and place it in the Files
section, or else contact me offline? Many thanks,
Ben Brown
Ben,

A quick trip to the Bowser web site will let you download the diagram for set 190-324.

Try http://www.bowser-trains.com/pdf/cal_scale_frt_cars.pdf

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin
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|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
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Re: Cal-Scale Express Reefer Underframe Detail Kit

Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...>
 

Hello Ben,

You can view and print the Cal-Scale drawing from the Bowser Web site at www.bowser-trains.com.

So long,

Andy

Andy Sperandeo
Executive Editor
Model Railroader magazine
asperandeo@...
Phone: 262-796-8776, ex. 461
Fax: 262-796-1142
www.modelrailroader.com


Re: Asparagus and Peaches in SC

Carrock1998@...
 

Tom---the Oxford you refer to was it in Pennsylvania or was it in New Jersey?

Robert "Rocky" Jackson

In a message dated 7/28/2005 9:16:53 AM Central Standard Time,
tgmadden@... writes:
I don't recall any facilities on the DL&W's old main line
through that same area, other than team tracks at Oxford and
Columbia, for handling such small-lot traffic. The idea of truck
farms was to be close enough to your market to get produce from
field to fork in just a few hours.

Tom Madden


Re: Cal-Scale Express Reefer Underframe Detail Kit

Michael Aufderheide
 

Ben,

Bowser has put some stuff on line. See:

http://www.bowser-trains.com/img/190-324.jpg

Regards,

Mike Aufderheide

--- phrwy <benbrown@...> wrote:

Some years ago this detail kit consisting of parts
and an
installation drawing was available, but I have not
seen it for a long
time. What I am seeking is a copy of the drawing
sheet that came in
the kit. Could someone please scan a copy and place
it in the Files
section, or else contact me offline? Many thanks,
Ben Brown





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Re: Cal-Scale Express Reefer Underframe Detail Kit

Miller,Andrew S. <asmiller@...>
 

As I recall it was the same as their regular UC passenger car set with
the addition of end buffer castings. The plumbing and positioning
diagram should be similar. Both sets may now be available from Bowser.

Cut and pasted from their website:

Part # Description Price

190-300 UC Brake Set for Passenger Cars $2.50
190-324 Express Reefer Detail Kit $2.95


regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
phrwy
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2005 11:56 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Cal-Scale Express Reefer Underframe Detail Kit

Some years ago this detail kit consisting of parts and an
installation drawing was available, but I have not seen it for a long
time. What I am seeking is a copy of the drawing sheet that came in
the kit. Could someone please scan a copy and place it in the Files
section, or else contact me offline? Many thanks,
Ben Brown





Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Devcon Epoxy (was Using CA as a gap filler)

Andy Carlson
 

Yes, I have seen Devcon in a 1 pound package, though a
visit at Devcon's web site yielded nothing about
retail packs.

Some hardware stores sell Devcon's "Liquid Steel"
which to me seems identical to 2-Ton White, except for
the color. I use a little of this black epoxy to give
a nice light grey color to the White 2-Ton.

One nice feature of 2-Ton is its paste-like
consistency, which is useful for casting one piece car
bodies w/o the need for an inner mold. I have a WP N
scale F7A I made years ago (before Kato made their F7)
cast totally in Devcon White 2-Ton, including the
"High Line" pilot mounted snow plow. I still have that
model, and it is holding up just as well as if it were
styrene.

I would again caution against mixing 50:50. I suggest
55:45 White to cream hardener, or a rubbery expoxy
will result.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

--- "Thomas M. Olsen" <tmolsen@...> wrote:

I imagine from Andy's description of the WHITE
2-Ton epoxy, that there
must be several versions of this casting material on
the market.


Re: Asparagus and Peaches in SC

Carrock1998@...
 

I know the Ma & Pa Railroad served several canneries in Maryland and
Pennsylvania. I went back and looked up a report from May 22, 1937 that details the
industries they served. The report comes out of the Oppice of the Preseident &
General manager of the railroad located in Baltimore dated May 5, 1937. From
that report here is the canneries they served:

Hillsboro-Queen Anne Cooperative Corporation in Whiteford, Maryland (this had
at least one or more private sidings to it)

C.P. Scarboroguh in Delta, PA
Howard Proctor in Delta, PA

E.G. Ruff in Bryansville, Pennsylvania

J.T. Gemmill in High Rock, Pennsylvania

I don't know what the canneries processed as that is not detailed in the
report. As of 1960 the population of these towns was as follows---Whiteford--120,
Delta--822, Bryansville--25, and High Rock--I don't know.

Therefore, given their population as of 1960---given when the canneries were
operating it doesn't seem like they would have been huge operations.

Robert "Rocky" Jackson

In a message dated 7/28/2005 10:21:57 AM Central Standard Time,
@timboconnor writes:
Tim,

That sounds more like it! Most peach traffic by rail in those days
(and nowadays) probably was canned peaches and preserves. If anyone
has information on the location of major cannery areas in the U.S.
I'd love to hear about it... I know Central California is such a
place.


Cal-Scale Express Reefer Underframe Detail Kit

Ben Brown
 

Some years ago this detail kit consisting of parts and an
installation drawing was available, but I have not seen it for a long
time. What I am seeking is a copy of the drawing sheet that came in
the kit. Could someone please scan a copy and place it in the Files
section, or else contact me offline? Many thanks,
Ben Brown


mixing of meat and produce reefers

ed_mines
 

Were meat reefers ever used for produce, particiularly in the '40s?

Ed


Re: Charles Winters still selling?

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jul 28, 2005, at 5:41 AM, Jim King wrote:

Is Charles Winters (St. Louis) still selling his freight car and steam
prints? The last communication I had from him was in the early/mid-90s.
If he's still active, can someone verify his mailing address and phone
number?
Jim, it's my understanding that Charlie is in bad health and no longer doing darkroom work, but that Howard Vollrath has access to the Winters negative collection and may be able to make prints. The last address I have for Vollrath, which I believe may still be current, is 1000 West 97th Terrace, Kansas City, MO 64114.


Re: Asparagus and Peaches in SC

Tim O'Connor
 

Tim,

That sounds more like it! Most peach traffic by rail in those days
(and nowadays) probably was canned peaches and preserves. If anyone
has information on the location of major cannery areas in the U.S.
I'd love to hear about it... I know Central California is such a
place.

Whoops! Read the Class II RR data from Table 50 of the 1950 "Blue Book"
(ICC's 64th ANNUAL REPORT ON THE STATISTICS OF RAILWAYS IN THE UNITED
STATES).

Correct number is 115,210 tons of Fresh Peaches (Not Frozen) originated
on US Class I RR's in 1950 (or at the 1956 tons per car loading rate of
15.4 tons) about 7,481 car loads.

Tim Gilbert


Re: Asparagus and Peaches in SC

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:


Tim Gilbert wrote


In 1950, 3,307 tons of fresh peaches not frozen were originated on Class
I RR's in the US. At roughly 25 tons per car, that would be 132 carloads.

Tim, where did you get that number?? The area around Grand Junction
is a large peach growing region, and in 1950 roads were poor and the
markets distant... And there is a fine 1955 color photo of G.J. yard
absolutely JAMMED with ART ice reefers... more than 100 are visible.
Did peach traffic suddenly expand from 1950 to 1955?

Tim O.
Whoops! Read the Class II RR data from Table 50 of the 1950 "Blue Book" (ICC's 64th ANNUAL REPORT ON THE STATISTICS OF RAILWAYS IN THE UNITED STATES).

Correct number is 115,210 tons of Fresh Peaches (Not Frozen) originated on US Class I RR's in 1950 (or at the 1956 tons per car loading rate of 15.4 tons) about 7,481 car loads.

Tim Gilbert


Re: Asparagus and Peaches in SC

Michael Mang <mnmang@...>
 

My 1950 ICC Revenue Freight Report for the DL&W showed that the DL&W alone
carried 1,240 tons of Peaches, fresh, not frozen in 103 carloads, or 12 tons
per car. No tons were originated on the DL&W, and 9 carloads terminated on
line. The rest were delivered to connecting roads.

It would be interesting to learn why one third of the US peach traffic
passed through the hands of the Lackawanna that year.

Incidentally, looking at other produce entries in the ICC report, it appears
that many of the agricultural commodities were carried in lots around 10-15
tons in size. Even allowing for full ice bunkers, that seems like a light
load.

Michael Mang

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Tim O'Connor
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2005 9:28 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Asparagus and Peaches in SC


Tim Gilbert wrote


In 1950, 3,307 tons of fresh peaches not frozen were originated on Class
I RR's in the US. At roughly 25 tons per car, that would be 132 carloads.

Tim, where did you get that number?? The area around Grand Junction
is a large peach growing region, and in 1950 roads were poor and the
markets distant... And there is a fine 1955 color photo of G.J. yard
absolutely JAMMED with ART ice reefers... more than 100 are visible.
Did peach traffic suddenly expand from 1950 to 1955?

Tim O.





Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: Asparagus and Peaches in SC

Tim O'Connor
 

Tim Gilbert wrote


In 1950, 3,307 tons of fresh peaches not frozen were originated on Class
I RR's in the US. At roughly 25 tons per car, that would be 132 carloads.

Tim, where did you get that number?? The area around Grand Junction
is a large peach growing region, and in 1950 roads were poor and the
markets distant... And there is a fine 1955 color photo of G.J. yard
absolutely JAMMED with ART ice reefers... more than 100 are visible.
Did peach traffic suddenly expand from 1950 to 1955?

Tim O.


Re: Wabash #8000-8299 series boxcars #8000-8299

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Scott Pitzer wrote:
"It says here I replaced the ends on the Accurail body with resin ones--
no doubt from "Canadian Railway Model Parts Guild." Branchline should
have the equivalent design (R/3/4 with the rolling pin cross-section on
the 3/4 ribs.)"

Branchline 100001
http://www.branchline-trains.com/blueprint/parts/detailparts.htm


"I used "mostly Champ lettering but large flag from Microscale multi-
road set." There could be something much better from Mark Vaughan or
another source."

Looks like Mark Vaughan E-1 or E-2, though I'm hoping Mark or Chet will
chime in here...
http://www.desplaineshobbies.com/mevdecals.html


Ben Hom


Re: Asparagus and Peaches in SC

pullmanboss <tgmadden@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@s...> wrote:
Carrock1998 wrote:

There is a huge area of land there [southern NJ]
that has
peaches. You might want to check to see if there were shipments
originating
there. My conjecture would be that it was mainly shipped to
either
Philadelphia
or New York City.
Tim Gilbert answered:
By truck.
They were called "truck farms", and there were quite a few in
northern & central New Jersey as well. Learned about them in
geography class in school back in the '40s and the term must have
made quite an impression on me as I still remember it. Along with
the interesting factoid that hemp was grown in the Yucatan and was
used for making rope.

All manner of fruits and (especially) vegetables was grown in New
Jersey truck farms, and in season there would be daily deliveries of
fresh produce to markets in nearby metropolitan areas. There were
(and still are) many roadside stands where motorists could purchase
directly from the growers. Our occasional driving trips to New York
City on Route 46 back then took us through some truck farming areas,
and I don't recall any facilities on the DL&W's old main line
through that same area, other than team tracks at Oxford and
Columbia, for handling such small-lot traffic. The idea of truck
farms was to be close enough to your market to get produce from
field to fork in just a few hours.

Tom Madden


Re: Asparagus and Peaches in SC

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Carrock1998@... wrote:

When I was in high school I worked on a project with a meteorologist from
Rutgers University studying the phases of the moon and whether there was a
correlation between them and frost. This study was done in relation to the peach
farmers in Southern New Jersey. There is a huge area of land there that has
peaches. You might want to check to see if there were shipments originating
there. My conjecture would be that it was mainly shipped to either Philadelphia
or New York City.
By truck.

Tim Gilbert