Date   

Branchline REA handbrake brake rod

Andy Cich <ajc5150@...>
 

I started building one of the new Branchline REA cars, and it appears to me
that there should be a rod that starts at the lever on the brake cylinder
and heads in the direction of the brakewhel. Or were these reefers not set
up like a typical freight car and the handwheel rod is hidden?

This rod will be easy enough to add, but I want to make sure I should add it
before
I do. A photo on page 66 of RPC7 shows a hint of the chain that connects
the rod to the lever.

Andy Cich


High Speed Merchandise Service

Allen Cain <allencain@...>
 

Would the so called "Merchandise Service - High Speed" boxcars such as those
run by Monon and PRR in the early 1950's have gotten off of the home
railroads and if so, how far of a range would they be expected to have?



Thanks,



Allen Cain


Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Paul Hillman wrote:
I mean solid bearings? Do I? I guess! But, at the "Birmingham Rail & Locomotive Co." . . .
I guess I left out the word "bearing", but I've always referred to them as friction bearings or friction journals. I guess it depends upon what part of the south one's from.
As we often discuss on this list, Paul, the roller bearing companies introduced the term "friction bearing" in their advertising in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Many railroaders bought into it, as Larry Jackman testifies; but of course there is friction in any bearing so far developed, and in fact the solid bearing has about the same friction as a roller bearing above 15 or so miles an hour; it's only at starting where the roller bearing is so superior. If you want to buy into the advertising strategy of Timken, et al., that's fine. But look at the professional railroad literature and everything not published by the roller bearing guys calls the old style a "solid bearing" or similar term.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It

Roger Parry <uncleroger@...>
 

Did not NWSL produce a box car with a flywheel in it to simulate momentum?

On Aug 21, 2005, at 4:42 PM, Tom Jones III wrote:

I think that may be the only solution, short of having a powered truck that
simulates the inertia/momentum of a car. It could be completely self
contained; one would need a way to sense rotation of the wheels and a simple
computer to calculate the resistance or accelleration, etc. But, I wonder if
it might not be quite expensive.

Of course, if you don't care too much about the appearance, I would think
you could add very heavy axle weights to the two inner axles on most freight
cars. They would resist rolling, simulating inertia, and would likewise
resist stopping, simulating momentum. I don't think lead would give enough
resistance - perhaps spent uranium? I don't know if the flywheel effect
would be enough to drive the car very far, but it would be easier than
driving a flywheel inside the car with belts or rubberbands.

Tom

----- Original Message -----
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Scale Weights - Doubt It


Tom Jones wrote:

My focus was more on simulation of scale momentum of models, yours is the
faithful creation of models.
*********************************************************************** *****
Tom,

I have ALSO been interested in trying to do "flying switches"
(correct-term?) with boxcars into sidings, etc., and have frequently tried
it by fine-tuning the trucks and car-weights. But short of putting a
fly-wheel in a car, like John Allen did, I didn't have all that much hoped
for luck,.....yet.

Paul Hillman




Yahoo! Groups Links






Coming Event.

Edwin C. Kirstatter <Q1xaMacArthur1@...>
 

Coming November 12th will be the annual Akron, Canton & Youngstown
Railroad Historical Society convention.

Yes we are a little Society for a little railroad but we put on a big one

day convention.

Location: Again at Sharon Center, Ohio Township Hall not far from the
ACY's main line across Ohio, now part of the W&LE.

What is happening? Model Contest, Slide shows, Speakers, Dealers.
Our Bookstore will be there with lots of
Photos
for sale & etc.

Dinner: Catered dinner in evening and box lunches by reservations.


Reservations: See our Web Site - wwwACY.org

Edwin C. Kirstatter, Treas.


Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It

ljack70117@...
 

On Sunday, August 21, 2005, at 05:22 PM, Paul Hillman wrote:

I mean solid bearings? Do I? I guess! But, at the "Birmingham Rail & Locomotive Co." page, URL

http://www.bhamrail.com/parts.asp#locowheel<http://www.bhamrail.com/ partsasp#locowheel>
They refer to:

*********************************************************************** *****

ALCO

For 660-hp to 1,000-hp switchers with 7" x 14" friction bearing journals - Blunt style trucks

Also available: converted roller bearing.

For 660-hp to 1,000-hp switchers with 61/2" x 12" friction bearing journals - AAR style trucks

Also available: converted roller bearing.

*********************************************************************** *****

I guess I left out the word "bearing", but I've always referred to them as friction bearings or friction journals. I guess it depends upon what part of the south one's from.

Paul Hillman
You are right. "Friction Bearings". At least that is what the RR men working in the field and on the ground called them. I never heard them called solid bearings until I got on some of these lists. That is about 45 years after I left the RRs. I am not from the south. I worked for Un Pac and John Santa Fe in Kansas. Had a friend in KS from the RI and same terms used.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net
You can't have everything. Where would you put it?


Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It

Paul Hillman
 

I mean solid bearings? Do I? I guess! But, at the "Birmingham Rail & Locomotive Co." page, URL

http://www.bhamrail.com/parts.asp#locowheel<http://www.bhamrail.com/partsasp#locowheel>
They refer to:

****************************************************************************

ALCO

For 660-hp to 1,000-hp switchers with 7" x 14" friction bearing journals - Blunt style trucks

Also available: converted roller bearing.

For 660-hp to 1,000-hp switchers with 61/2" x 12" friction bearing journals - AAR style trucks

Also available: converted roller bearing.

****************************************************************************

I guess I left out the word "bearing", but I've always referred to them as friction bearings or friction journals. I guess it depends upon what part of the south one's from.

Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----

From: Anthony Thompson<mailto:thompson@signaturepress.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, August 21, 2005 3:23 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It


Paul Hillman wrote:
> Weren't archbar trucks downgraded, and friction-journals, etc., for
> similar reasons, et al?

You mean, of course, solid bearings . . . <g>.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com<http://www.signaturepress.com/>
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com<mailto:thompson@signaturepress.com>
Publishers of books on railroad history


St Louis RPM

Clark Propst <cepropst@...>
 

I would like to thank John Golden and his crew for putting on a very enjoyable meet. Was well worth the drive.
Clark Propst


Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It

Tom Jones III <tomtherailnut@...>
 

I think that may be the only solution, short of having a powered truck that
simulates the inertia/momentum of a car. It could be completely self
contained; one would need a way to sense rotation of the wheels and a simple
computer to calculate the resistance or accelleration, etc. But, I wonder if
it might not be quite expensive.

Of course, if you don't care too much about the appearance, I would think
you could add very heavy axle weights to the two inner axles on most freight
cars. They would resist rolling, simulating inertia, and would likewise
resist stopping, simulating momentum. I don't think lead would give enough
resistance - perhaps spent uranium? I don't know if the flywheel effect
would be enough to drive the car very far, but it would be easier than
driving a flywheel inside the car with belts or rubberbands.

Tom

----- Original Message -----
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Scale Weights - Doubt It


Tom Jones wrote:

My focus was more on simulation of scale momentum of models, yours is the
faithful creation of models.
****************************************************************************
Tom,

I have ALSO been interested in trying to do "flying switches"
(correct-term?) with boxcars into sidings, etc., and have frequently tried
it by fine-tuning the trucks and car-weights. But short of putting a
fly-wheel in a car, like John Allen did, I didn't have all that much hoped
for luck,.....yet.

Paul Hillman


Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Paul Hillman wrote:
Weren't archbar trucks downgraded, and friction-journals, etc., for similar reasons, et al?
You mean, of course, solid bearings . . . <g>.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Freight car colors

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tom Jones III wrote:
I stand corrected! Thank you! The mystery now deepens - why both appear
glossy for a while, at least. Having read some of the formulas, most relied
upon linseed oil or hemp oil as binder/carriers. Both tend to dull pretty
quickly, and neither really develop much gloss to begin with. Again, I
assume it is because new BCR or stencil white have quite a bit of oil to
evaporate away, rather than an attempt to add intentional gloss to the cars.
Your thoughts?
I don't know. You are certainly right that cars got dull quite quickly, in the first month in many documented cases, though whether from paint behavior or weathering dirt, I don't know--I've always assumed it was dirt, but paint changes would contribute.
Chalking, I guess, remains the best candidate for the "bright white on a dirty car" effect.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


PRR H21d photos

Bill Lane <billlane@...>
 

Hi All,

With the H21 starting on the PRR Pro group
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PRRPro soon, I thought that someone might want
to do the H21d. I recently won the complete Builders Photo 4 view set in a
hard fought eBay battle. http://mywebpages.comcast.net/billlane/H21d.jpg
Sorry if I outbid you but at least you know where they are now. They are
photos E9908 E9909 E9910 & E9912.

As most of you know I am always good to give out photos to help out on
projects, but these photos cost me a little more then usual. I would just
like to recoup on that a little. I am offering the 4 glossy photo set
printed at 8 x 10 from my Epson 2200 photo printer for $22.00 mailing
included. I scanned them at 150% at 800 DPI and cleaned them up in
Photoshop. Some of the side photos (E9908) I have seen were printed from a
negative that is disintegrating. This side shot is complete and undamaged.

I can accept PayPal if your account is NOT linked to a credit card. You must
have cash in your PayPal account. My PayPal ID is this email address
billlane@comcast.net

Thank You,
Bill Lane

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy in S Scale in 1957

See my finished models at:
http://www.lanestrains.com

Importing a Brass S Scale PRR X29 & G26
http://www.pennsysmodels.com

ALL of the production X29 have arrived as of 6-30-05

***Join the PRR T&HS***
The other members are not ALL like me!
http://www.prrths.com


Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It

Paul Hillman
 

Tom Jones wrote:

My focus was more on simulation of scale momentum of models, yours is the
faithful creation of models.
****************************************************************************
Tom,

I have ALSO been interested in trying to do "flying switches" (correct-term?) with boxcars into sidings, etc., and have frequently tried it by fine-tuning the trucks and car-weights. But short of putting a fly-wheel in a car, like John Allen did, I didn't have all that much hoped for luck,.....yet.

Paul Hillman


Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It

Tom Jones III <tomtherailnut@...>
 

And now I understand your desires. Thank you.

My focus was more on simulation of scale momentum of models, yours is the
faithful creation of models. Sadly, in my opinion, the twain don't meet
here.

Tom Jones

----- Original Message -----
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Scale Weights - Doubt It


Tom,

Actually to me the answer is quite simple, (but then I'm kinda weird some
say), because of the general context's of the STMFC's stated purpose and the
MANY topics discussed in this group. Everything possible seems to be
considered for discussion, from the scale size of rivet-heads, to exact
underframes, exact brake-wheels, exact metal-thickness, exact car-color &
weathering, ad infinitum!! Scale-weight is just, in fact, another part of
the total scale-picture!

But, James Eckman just posted a link to the page, "Railway Engineering",
that very interestingly covers the scale-weight & car-weighting issue, by
Steve Hatch, questions 9 & 10. As per Hatch's hypothesis, weight doesn't,
almost, matter at all, and states why. His theories actually argue in favor
of why NOT use actual scale-weight in our cars? Therefore, the case for
actually attaining the scale-weight of a model, to me, should become an
additional function in the total scale-building formula, as well as the
question, "What color would be the under-carriage of a NYC freight-car
traveling through Phoenix, Arizona in August of 1947."

Paul Hillman


Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It

Paul Hillman
 

Tom,

Actually to me the answer is quite simple, (but then I'm kinda weird some say), because of the general context's of the STMFC's stated purpose and the MANY topics discussed in this group. Everything possible seems to be considered for discussion, from the scale size of rivet-heads, to exact underframes, exact brake-wheels, exact metal-thickness, exact car-color & weathering, ad infinitum!! Scale-weight is just, in fact, another part of the total scale-picture!

But, James Eckman just posted a link to the page, "Railway Engineering", that very interestingly covers the scale-weight & car-weighting issue, by Steve Hatch, questions 9 & 10. As per Hatch's hypothesis, weight doesn't, almost, matter at all, and states why. His theories actually argue in favor of why NOT use actual scale-weight in our cars? Therefore, the case for actually attaining the scale-weight of a model, to me, should become an additional function in the total scale-building formula, as well as the question, "What color would be the under-carriage of a NYC freight-car traveling through Phoenix, Arizona in August of 1947."

Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: Tom Jones III<mailto:tomtherailnut@cox.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, August 20, 2005 10:40 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Scale Weights - Doubt It


Paul:

My only question is: "Why scale WEIGHT?" What do you achieve by having exact
scale weight, vs. weight that makes the car act and appear to have the same
mass as the prototype would under the same circumstances? I am not
challenging you, I am simply trying to figure out what it is you wish to
achieve.

Tom Jones III


Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It

Paul Hillman
 

Mike,

That WOULD be an interesting little "detail" to put on a freight-car. I think I'll try that just for fun.

Once somebody suggested attaching some kind of device to a rail, to make it pull down as the wheels pass over, from the weight, just like we often see on the prototype. I'm gonna try that too, without having to add 20 lbs. of weight to the car.

Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: Mike Brock<mailto:brockm@brevard.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, August 20, 2005 10:07 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It


Paul Hillman writes:


> This is the same thing that the prototype has had to deal with. Now we're
> getting down to the "nitty-gritty" of the TRUE prototyping of our model
> railroad cars,..... theory of parts & materials in action. Total dynamics!

Ah, well. Mebbie so. However, if you really want to simulate total dynamics,
flatten a metal wheel. Kind of interesting. The thing does clank
along...somewhat prototypically.

Mike Brock


Good running model freight cars

James Eckman
 

Steve Hatch has an alternative view to the NMRA weighting standards, details here:

http://www.railwayeng.com/rrhints.htm

One group I'm a member of has a portable layout with extreme curves and grades in places, to much weight in a car means it can't go up the hill! Also if the weights too high, it will tip.

For my flatlander layout I don't worry about it because I have very broad curves and no grades. If your building up models, I would recommend some form of three point suspension on your cars.

Jim Eckman


Re: Freight car colors

Tom Jones III <tomtherailnut@...>
 

I stand corrected! Thank you! The mystery now deepens - why both appear
glossy for a while, at least. Having read some of the formulas, most relied
upon linseed oil or hemp oil as binder/carriers. Both tend to dull pretty
quickly, and neither really develop much gloss to begin with. Again, I
assume it is because new BCR or stencil white have quite a bit of oil to
evaporate away, rather than an attempt to add intentional gloss to the cars.
Your thoughts?

Tom Jones

----- Original Message -----

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Freight car colors


I wonder if the apparent gloss of BCR is primarily due to excess
linseed oil . . . (snipped stupidity)
Nope. The "white stencil paste" widely used in the steam era was
formulated just like other car paints, same ingredients but mixed in
different proportions to make it stiff to be applied with a stencil
brush. In times after 1960, it may well be true that enamels were used,
but that's not for this list.


Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It

Tom Jones III <tomtherailnut@...>
 

Paul:

My only question is: "Why scale WEIGHT?" What do you achieve by having exact
scale weight, vs. weight that makes the car act and appear to have the same
mass as the prototype would under the same circumstances? I am not
challenging you, I am simply trying to figure out what it is you wish to
achieve.

Tom Jones III

----- Original Message -----
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Scale Weights - Doubt It


"The concept of "Scale Weight" really is a dead end, in my opinion."
****************************************************************************
****
Response:

Well not to me!!


Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Paul Hillman writes:


This is the same thing that the prototype has had to deal with. Now we're getting down to the "nitty-gritty" of the TRUE prototyping of our model railroad cars,..... theory of parts & materials in action. Total dynamics!
Ah, well. Mebbie so. However, if you really want to simulate total dynamics, flatten a metal wheel. Kind of interesting. The thing does clank along...somewhat prototypically.

Mike Brock

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