Date   

Re: Accurate Paint Schemes on the Accurail 40' Wood Boxcars?

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Ben Hom wrote:
Most of these paint schemes are based on USRA SS boxcars, which these
kits do not accurately represent. Some are based on similar cars but
are lower in height. A few schemes are completely bogus.
USRA SS Boxcars or close copies: 4301 SP, 4303 CNW, 4304 PRR, 4305 NYC,
4306 B&O, 4308 CP, 4309 Erie, 4311 NYC, 4313 WM, 4314 N&W, 4315
Clinchfield, 4316 AA, 4317 D&H, 4502 PRR, 4505 RDG, 4508 CG (believe
this is actually GA)
The SP paint scheme on #4301 is for a B-50-14 box car with Z-bar bracing, NOT a USRA car. As Ben says, there is some general appearance similarity, but many discrepancies, including dimensions. I would call the model a stand-in for the SP B-50-14 cars.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: dutch drop

Roger Parry <uncleroger@...>
 

I have also herd this called a "flying switch" or a "Chinese switch"

On Aug 25, 2005, at 12:47 PM, ljack70117@... wrote:


On Thursday, August 25, 2005, at 12:39 PM, Clyde Williams wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., "Tom Jones III" <tomtherailnut@c...>
wrote:
The Dutch drop was to get the car from the north end of the engine
to the
south end (for example), but without a run-around. So, the moving
car was
allowed to roll past the locomotive that has run away from the
rolling car,
stopped, reversed, thrown the switch, and run into what was a
trailing point
switch. The switch is then thrown again and the car rolls past,
putting the
car at the other end of the locomotive. The locomotive now throws
the
switch, runs out of the spur, catches the rolling boxcar (or the
brakeman
has stopped it), and the train reassembled.

As for why - if there is switching to be done, and there is no way
to get

My impression of the Dutch Drop was that, to get a car into a facing
point spur, the engine sped up and then the car to be dropped was
uncoupled. then the engine sped up even more and as it passed the
switch the points were thrown and the car rolled into the spur.
This is a drop not dutch drop.

A dutch drop can be done as I did one when I was a switchman on John
Santa Fe in Emporia Ks. Missed our engine by about 3 feet. Using a alco
S4. It is very dangerous to do. Never did an other one.


Getting the engine far enough ahead of the car to stop, back into a
trailing point spur (assuming there was one handy) and throw the
switch back would seem impossible, as well as even more dangerous, to
do.
Bill Williams
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@...
You can't have everything. Where would you put it?





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returning photos

ed_mines
 

I heard the same complaint about scanning from a man who used to
offer prints from copy negatives from the ACF collection - he had a
100 page catalog of negatives.

The solution is simple - a policy of no returns.

I've always kept photos that I was unhappy with because I wanted the
seller to continue to do business with me. Ditto for merchandise
bought from basement hobby shop operators. At any time the seller
could cut me off.

Some of the guys selling prints (and Sunshine Models) are very slow
to respond. These sellers are not desparate for business.

I think Bob would make more money if he sold prints through the mail
in addition to the shows - there's very little additional expense to
what he has now - the cost of clerk to maintain a list, pick photos
and send them out. He doesn't bring all photos to all shows anyway
and many of his show customers limit their purchase to the amount of
money they have in their pocket.

Ed


Re: Bob's photos

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

branchline@... wrote:

Jeez Tony, you West Coast types really are wimps... :>)

In fact, its not a real Springfield show if it doesn't snow at least one
day... A few years back we had a blizzard the first morning of Springfield.
We showed up early to set up the booth and were greeted by a long line of
hearty New England model railroaders waiting two hours or more outside - in
the blinding snow - to get in! Now them's real model railroaders! Think I
even saw Tim in that line....
This Tim is a bit wiser - stay in the car with a mug of coffee until just before the doors open. Also, bring a broom to sweep the snow away when leaving.

Tim Gilbert


Re: Solid, Roller & Friction Bearing Journals

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Paul Hillman wrote:
Throughout this long 675 page text, I have yet to find the
term "solid bearing". (But I'm not finished reading yet!) The only
terms found are "bearing-friction", "ordinary-journals" and "journal-
friction".
The normal term in that period was "journal bearing," which of course refers to the journal on which the bearing rests, and there was no need to distinguish between different kinds of them in service.

An interesting point though is the discussion in 1903 of, "Roller
Journals". Until now one might think that "Timken", et al, had
invented the roller-bearing in the '30's or '40's, but these old
boys were working on it like 30+ years earlier??
The roller bearing was indeed not really applied to railroad practice until the 1920s but was a known principle much earlier in mechanical design, as Paul has discovered. There was a roller bearing arch-bar truck introduced in the 1920s (for a photo, see Hendrickson's article in RP CYC 4).

I would think that the RR men knew what terms they'd chosen to use correctly.
A reasonable supposition but one with many contrary examples.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Bob's photos

branchline@...
 

Jeez Tony, you West Coast types really are wimps... :>)

In fact, its not a real Springfield show if it doesn't snow at least one day... A few years back we had a blizzard the first morning of Springfield. We showed up early to set up the booth and were greeted by a long line of hearty New England model railroaders waiting two hours or more outside - in the blinding snow - to get in! Now them's real model railroaders! Think I even saw Tim in that line....

Now, having said all that - See you at the pool bar in Cocoa Beach!

Bill Schneider

Tim O'Connor wrote:
Springfield Massachusetts, Tony... in January.
In January. You ARE kidding.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history




Yahoo! Groups Links







Re: dutch drop

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Thomas M. Olsen wrote:
In the many times that I witnessed this move, they never had
a derailment or a "run in" with the equipment . . . The crews that I
worked with as an operator, all had worked with each other for a long
time and had a lot of experience in making this type of movement.
Well said, Tom. I have heard the same of experienced crews elsewhere. The fact that the move is obviously dangerous and can go wrong, does NOT mean it went wrong all the time.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Bob's photos

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
Springfield Massachusetts, Tony... in January.
In January. You ARE kidding.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: H.K. Vollrath address

Ed Hawkins
 

On Thursday, August 25, 2005, at 06:45 AM, cr6485 wrote:

In searching the archives of this list, I found that Richard
Hendrickson posted the following "last known good address" for H.K.
Vollrath.  Can anyone confirm this is still correct?  Is there a phone
number?

H.K. Vollrath
1000 West
97th Terrace, Kansas City, MO 64114
Keith,
This is a good address for Mr. Vollrath. His phone no. is 816-942-3423,
listed at www.switchboard.com.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Bobs Photos . . . ?

Fred in Vt. <pennsy@...>
 

Brian,

The photo man you seek is;

Bob Liljistrand
37 Spring St
Ansonia, Ct. 06401
[203]-734-6666

No catalog & No website/e-mail

Fred Freitas
Bennington, Vt

----- Original Message -----
From: Brian Chapman
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2005 11:30 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Bobs Photos . . . ?


Possible to get a quick summary about how to order from Bob's Photos?
Address? Does he offer a catalog?

Are there other notable photo dealers out there? Perhaps there is a
Top 5, or a Top 10 . . . is there contact information readily available?

Thanks much,

Brian Chapman / Evansdale, Iowa







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Re: dutch drop

Jared Harper <harper-brown@...>
 

My impression of the Dutch Drop was that, to get a car into a
facing
point spur, the engine sped up and then the car to be dropped was
uncoupled. then the engine sped up even more and as it passed the
switch the points were thrown and the car rolled into the spur.
Getting the engine far enough ahead of the car to stop, back into a
trailing point spur (assuming there was one handy) and throw the
switch back would seem impossible, as well as even more dangerous,
to
do.
Bill Williams
What ever it is called, I want to know if there is anyone out there
who does this on their layout. If anyone has I would like to know how
it is accomplished in the model world.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Re: dutch drop

ljack70117@...
 

On Thursday, August 25, 2005, at 12:39 PM, Clyde Williams wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., "Tom Jones III" <tomtherailnut@c...>
wrote:
The Dutch drop was to get the car from the north end of the engine
to the
south end (for example), but without a run-around. So, the moving
car was
allowed to roll past the locomotive that has run away from the
rolling car,
stopped, reversed, thrown the switch, and run into what was a
trailing point
switch. The switch is then thrown again and the car rolls past,
putting the
car at the other end of the locomotive. The locomotive now throws
the
switch, runs out of the spur, catches the rolling boxcar (or the
brakeman
has stopped it), and the train reassembled.

As for why - if there is switching to be done, and there is no way
to get

My impression of the Dutch Drop was that, to get a car into a facing
point spur, the engine sped up and then the car to be dropped was
uncoupled. then the engine sped up even more and as it passed the
switch the points were thrown and the car rolled into the spur.
This is a drop not dutch drop.

A dutch drop can be done as I did one when I was a switchman on John Santa Fe in Emporia Ks. Missed our engine by about 3 feet. Using a alco S4. It is very dangerous to do. Never did an other one.


Getting the engine far enough ahead of the car to stop, back into a
trailing point spur (assuming there was one handy) and throw the
switch back would seem impossible, as well as even more dangerous, to
do.
Bill Williams
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@...
You can't have everything. Where would you put it?


Re: dutch drop

Clyde Williams <billdgoat@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Tom Jones III" <tomtherailnut@c...>
wrote:
The Dutch drop was to get the car from the north end of the engine
to the
south end (for example), but without a run-around. So, the moving
car was
allowed to roll past the locomotive that has run away from the
rolling car,
stopped, reversed, thrown the switch, and run into what was a
trailing point
switch. The switch is then thrown again and the car rolls past,
putting the
car at the other end of the locomotive. The locomotive now throws
the
switch, runs out of the spur, catches the rolling boxcar (or the
brakeman
has stopped it), and the train reassembled.

As for why - if there is switching to be done, and there is no way
to get

My impression of the Dutch Drop was that, to get a car into a facing
point spur, the engine sped up and then the car to be dropped was
uncoupled. then the engine sped up even more and as it passed the
switch the points were thrown and the car rolled into the spur.
Getting the engine far enough ahead of the car to stop, back into a
trailing point spur (assuming there was one handy) and throw the
switch back would seem impossible, as well as even more dangerous, to
do.
Bill Williams





the car to the other end of the train except to travel several
miles to a
run around, well, many crews won't suffer along with spending
literally
hours running to a run-around just to run back. Hence, the Dutch
drop.

Tom

----- Original Message -----
Subject: Re: [STMFC] dutch drop


Now for the fun and games. A "DUTCH drop". You want to get
the car to
the other end of your engine but you have a trailing point
switch.

Why would you even want to do a "dutch drop"?

The goal is to get the car to the other end of the engine. What
reasons
would there be to do that other than to switch a facing point
switch. If
you
are going to do a facing point move, why not just do the regular
drop?


Bobs Photos . . . ?

Brian Chapman <cornbeltroute@...>
 

Possible to get a quick summary about how to order from Bob's Photos?
Address? Does he offer a catalog?

Are there other notable photo dealers out there? Perhaps there is a
Top 5, or a Top 10 . . . is there contact information readily available?

Thanks much,

Brian Chapman / Evansdale, Iowa


Re: Accurate Paint Schemes on the Accurail 40' Wood Boxcars?

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Jason Sanford asked:
"I am trying to figure out which Accurail 40' Wood sided boxcars are
pretty close to accurate and which paint schemes are legitimate paint
schemes? I am interested in the 4300, 4500, 7100, and the 7000 series
cars."

Jason, thanks for posting an actual modeling question! It's a great
break from the never-ending scale weight/"friction" bearing/climate
debate threads!

4300/4500 series:
http://www.accurail.com/accurail/4300.htm
http://www.accurail.com/accurail/4500.htm

Most of these paint schemes are based on USRA SS boxcars, which these
kits do not accurately represent. Some are based on similar cars but
are lower in height. A few schemes are completely bogus.
Additionally, some of these prototypes had straight center sills
instead of the fishbelly center sills provided with the kit. These can
be modeled using 2x12 styrene strip in place of the supplied
centersills. Here's a quick summary:

Close: 4302 M-K-T, 4310 CN, 4506 DM&IR

Similar (Different IH and/or radial roofs): 4307 LNE, 4312 CB&Q, 4318
SL-SF, 4503 NP, 4504 MP

USRA SS Boxcars or close copies: 4301 SP, 4303 CNW, 4304 PRR, 4305 NYC,
4306 B&O, 4308 CP, 4309 Erie, 4311 NYC, 4313 WM, 4314 N&W, 4315
Clinchfield, 4316 AA, 4317 D&H, 4502 PRR, 4505 RDG, 4508 CG (believe
this is actually GA)

Bogus: 4319 WAB, 4501 ATSF, 4507 WAB


7000/7100 series:
http://www.accurail.com/accurail/7000.htm
http://www.accurail.com/accurail/7100.htm

The closest prototypes for these models are Illinois Central:
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/modeling/new%
20products/accurail/accu7000.html

This is a relatively rare prototype, as many cars with this Howe truss
configuration are lower in height than this model. Many of the schemes
offered are for ARA design SS boxcars, Fowler patent boxcars, or Mather
patent boxcars, which this model definitely is not. Only the IC models
can be considered close, and that wears an as-built scheme gone by the
transition era. 5th Avenue Car Shops offers both these cars in the
correct IC transition era scheme, as well as some other closer
prototypes.

Much more information on both these models and prototypes can be found
of the pay side of the RPI website at http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/ .


Ben Hom


Re: Placement of end lettering for LNE hoppers

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Mark Heiden wrote:

I have a question regarding the end lettering on Lehigh & New England
twin-bay offset side hoppers, series 13251-13350. These cars were
built in 1939 by Bethlehem Steel Company.
I'm lettering a car using CDS dry transfer set 713, and while the
lettering diagram shows a broadside view, it does not show the ends. Does anyone know how the reporting marks and car numbers were arranged
on the ends? Was there any other lettering on the ends? I'm modeling
a car still in its original paint, so information on the as-delivered
lettering is what I'm seeking.
Mark,

While I don't have a builder's photo of the L&NE hopper, I do have one of B&M #7152 which Bethlehem built in 1941. The end lettering was on two lines on the right side - "BM" and "7152" in roman lettering. There was no other end lettering.

Tim Gilbert


Placement of end lettering for LNE hoppers

Mark Heiden
 

Hello everyone,

I have a question regarding the end lettering on Lehigh & New England
twin-bay offset side hoppers, series 13251-13350. These cars were
built in 1939 by Bethlehem Steel Company.

I'm lettering a car using CDS dry transfer set 713, and while the
lettering diagram shows a broadside view, it does not show the ends.
Does anyone know how the reporting marks and car numbers were arranged
on the ends? Was there any other lettering on the ends? I'm modeling
a car still in its original paint, so information on the as-delivered
lettering is what I'm seeking.

Thanks,
Mark Heiden


Model Dutch Drop

asychis@...
 

In a message dated 8/25/2005 12:36:26 PM Central Standard Time,
STMFC@... writes:
What ever it is called, I want to know if there is anyone out there
who does this on their layout. If anyone has I would like to know how
it is accomplished in the model world.


Probably can't be done on a routine basis. A car with a flywheel attached
could possibly be used or maybe some DCC setup, but in reality it would be
difficult if not impossible. As Tom Jones mentioned, friction and mass are the
culprits.

JErry Michels


H.K. Vollrath address

cr6485 <bbandbrr@...>
 

In searching the archives of this list, I found that Richard
Hendrickson posted the following "last known good address" for H.K.
Vollrath. Can anyone confirm this is still correct? Is there a phone
number?

H.K. Vollrath
1000 West
97th Terrace, Kansas City, MO 64114

I'd like to contact him about any Huntingdon & Broad Top Mountain or
Everett Railroad items he may have.

Thanks,
Keith

Keith Burkey
bbandbrr@...


Re: dutch drop

John Degnan <RailScaler@...>
 

I've heard this maneuver referred to as "playing bumper-cars"... and I heard that it is/was strongly frowned upon by the higher powers.


John Degnan
RailScaler@...
Announcing : Seaboard Air Line's B-7 Box Cars In S Scale!
http://www.trainweb.org/seaboard/SALRoundRoofBoxCarProject.htm

----- Original Message -----
From: Tom Jones III
To: STMFC@...
Sent: August 25, 2005 1:02 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] dutch drop


The Dutch drop was to get the car from the north end of the engine to the
south end (for example), but without a run-around. So, the moving car was
allowed to roll past the locomotive that has run away from the rolling car,
stopped, reversed, thrown the switch, and run into what was a trailing point
switch. The switch is then thrown again and the car rolls past, putting the
car at the other end of the locomotive. The locomotive now throws the
switch, runs out of the spur, catches the rolling boxcar (or the brakeman
has stopped it), and the train reassembled.

As for why - if there is switching to be done, and there is no way to get
the car to the other end of the train except to travel several miles to a
run around, well, many crews won't suffer along with spending literally
hours running to a run-around just to run back. Hence, the Dutch drop.

Tom

----- Original Message -----
Subject: Re: [STMFC] dutch drop


> >> Now for the fun and games. A "DUTCH drop". You want to get the car to
> >> the other end of your engine but you have a trailing point switch.
>
> Why would you even want to do a "dutch drop"?
>
> The goal is to get the car to the other end of the engine. What reasons
> would there be to do that other than to switch a facing point switch. If
you
> are going to do a facing point move, why not just do the regular drop?



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