Date   

Bobs Photos . . . ?

Brian Chapman <cornbeltroute@...>
 

Possible to get a quick summary about how to order from Bob's Photos?
Address? Does he offer a catalog?

Are there other notable photo dealers out there? Perhaps there is a
Top 5, or a Top 10 . . . is there contact information readily available?

Thanks much,

Brian Chapman / Evansdale, Iowa


Re: Accurate Paint Schemes on the Accurail 40' Wood Boxcars?

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Jason Sanford asked:
"I am trying to figure out which Accurail 40' Wood sided boxcars are
pretty close to accurate and which paint schemes are legitimate paint
schemes? I am interested in the 4300, 4500, 7100, and the 7000 series
cars."

Jason, thanks for posting an actual modeling question! It's a great
break from the never-ending scale weight/"friction" bearing/climate
debate threads!

4300/4500 series:
http://www.accurail.com/accurail/4300.htm
http://www.accurail.com/accurail/4500.htm

Most of these paint schemes are based on USRA SS boxcars, which these
kits do not accurately represent. Some are based on similar cars but
are lower in height. A few schemes are completely bogus.
Additionally, some of these prototypes had straight center sills
instead of the fishbelly center sills provided with the kit. These can
be modeled using 2x12 styrene strip in place of the supplied
centersills. Here's a quick summary:

Close: 4302 M-K-T, 4310 CN, 4506 DM&IR

Similar (Different IH and/or radial roofs): 4307 LNE, 4312 CB&Q, 4318
SL-SF, 4503 NP, 4504 MP

USRA SS Boxcars or close copies: 4301 SP, 4303 CNW, 4304 PRR, 4305 NYC,
4306 B&O, 4308 CP, 4309 Erie, 4311 NYC, 4313 WM, 4314 N&W, 4315
Clinchfield, 4316 AA, 4317 D&H, 4502 PRR, 4505 RDG, 4508 CG (believe
this is actually GA)

Bogus: 4319 WAB, 4501 ATSF, 4507 WAB


7000/7100 series:
http://www.accurail.com/accurail/7000.htm
http://www.accurail.com/accurail/7100.htm

The closest prototypes for these models are Illinois Central:
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/modeling/new%
20products/accurail/accu7000.html

This is a relatively rare prototype, as many cars with this Howe truss
configuration are lower in height than this model. Many of the schemes
offered are for ARA design SS boxcars, Fowler patent boxcars, or Mather
patent boxcars, which this model definitely is not. Only the IC models
can be considered close, and that wears an as-built scheme gone by the
transition era. 5th Avenue Car Shops offers both these cars in the
correct IC transition era scheme, as well as some other closer
prototypes.

Much more information on both these models and prototypes can be found
of the pay side of the RPI website at http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/ .


Ben Hom


Re: Placement of end lettering for LNE hoppers

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Mark Heiden wrote:

I have a question regarding the end lettering on Lehigh & New England
twin-bay offset side hoppers, series 13251-13350. These cars were
built in 1939 by Bethlehem Steel Company.
I'm lettering a car using CDS dry transfer set 713, and while the
lettering diagram shows a broadside view, it does not show the ends. Does anyone know how the reporting marks and car numbers were arranged
on the ends? Was there any other lettering on the ends? I'm modeling
a car still in its original paint, so information on the as-delivered
lettering is what I'm seeking.
Mark,

While I don't have a builder's photo of the L&NE hopper, I do have one of B&M #7152 which Bethlehem built in 1941. The end lettering was on two lines on the right side - "BM" and "7152" in roman lettering. There was no other end lettering.

Tim Gilbert


Placement of end lettering for LNE hoppers

Mark Heiden
 

Hello everyone,

I have a question regarding the end lettering on Lehigh & New England
twin-bay offset side hoppers, series 13251-13350. These cars were
built in 1939 by Bethlehem Steel Company.

I'm lettering a car using CDS dry transfer set 713, and while the
lettering diagram shows a broadside view, it does not show the ends.
Does anyone know how the reporting marks and car numbers were arranged
on the ends? Was there any other lettering on the ends? I'm modeling
a car still in its original paint, so information on the as-delivered
lettering is what I'm seeking.

Thanks,
Mark Heiden


Model Dutch Drop

asychis@...
 

In a message dated 8/25/2005 12:36:26 PM Central Standard Time,
STMFC@yahoogroups.com writes:
What ever it is called, I want to know if there is anyone out there
who does this on their layout. If anyone has I would like to know how
it is accomplished in the model world.


Probably can't be done on a routine basis. A car with a flywheel attached
could possibly be used or maybe some DCC setup, but in reality it would be
difficult if not impossible. As Tom Jones mentioned, friction and mass are the
culprits.

JErry Michels


H.K. Vollrath address

cr6485 <bbandbrr@...>
 

In searching the archives of this list, I found that Richard
Hendrickson posted the following "last known good address" for H.K.
Vollrath. Can anyone confirm this is still correct? Is there a phone
number?

H.K. Vollrath
1000 West
97th Terrace, Kansas City, MO 64114

I'd like to contact him about any Huntingdon & Broad Top Mountain or
Everett Railroad items he may have.

Thanks,
Keith

Keith Burkey
bbandbrr@bbandbrr.com


Re: dutch drop

John Degnan <RailScaler@...>
 

I've heard this maneuver referred to as "playing bumper-cars"... and I heard that it is/was strongly frowned upon by the higher powers.


John Degnan
RailScaler@comcast.net
Announcing : Seaboard Air Line's B-7 Box Cars In S Scale!
http://www.trainweb.org/seaboard/SALRoundRoofBoxCarProject.htm

----- Original Message -----
From: Tom Jones III
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: August 25, 2005 1:02 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] dutch drop


The Dutch drop was to get the car from the north end of the engine to the
south end (for example), but without a run-around. So, the moving car was
allowed to roll past the locomotive that has run away from the rolling car,
stopped, reversed, thrown the switch, and run into what was a trailing point
switch. The switch is then thrown again and the car rolls past, putting the
car at the other end of the locomotive. The locomotive now throws the
switch, runs out of the spur, catches the rolling boxcar (or the brakeman
has stopped it), and the train reassembled.

As for why - if there is switching to be done, and there is no way to get
the car to the other end of the train except to travel several miles to a
run around, well, many crews won't suffer along with spending literally
hours running to a run-around just to run back. Hence, the Dutch drop.

Tom

----- Original Message -----
Subject: Re: [STMFC] dutch drop


> >> Now for the fun and games. A "DUTCH drop". You want to get the car to
> >> the other end of your engine but you have a trailing point switch.
>
> Why would you even want to do a "dutch drop"?
>
> The goal is to get the car to the other end of the engine. What reasons
> would there be to do that other than to switch a facing point switch. If
you
> are going to do a facing point move, why not just do the regular drop?



SPONSORED LINKS Train travel Freight car Canada train travel
Train travel in italy North american


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Re: Bob's photos

Fred in Vt. <pennsy@...>
 

List,

Why do I get the impresson these guyz live in a motor home? They don't sem to be in residence much. Just how big a layout can they fit into one of those tag along trailers anyway?
Enquiring minds, etc......
No doubt each show has it's merit, what really counts is the $$$ for gas or airfare. Too much for either, and your buying power is too diminished for the show!!

Fred Freitas
modeling PRR, ca.1953

"You know you're a real Vermonter when your
grandparents drive 60 in blizzards."

----- Original Message -----
From: Ted Culotta
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2005 6:04 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] RE: Bob's photos



On Aug 24, 2005, at 11:47 PM, Richard Hendrickson wrote:

> On Aug 24, 2005, at 8:35 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
>>
>> Springfield Massachusetts, Tony... in January. Bob has several hundred
>> books, and chairs to sit on. And there are other excellent photo
>> dealers
>> there too.
>
> Springfield, Mass. in January? When Cocoa Beach, Fla. is an
> alternative? Give me, as we say, a break. The Springfield meet is all
> very well for those who already live in the area, but I spent three
> winters in New England once and I ain't goin' back.
>

Richard:

I'll agree with your assessment of the weather, but it is the best
train show in the country, bar none. Now, if you have everything you
need, as you do or are close to, then Cocoa Beach is a far better
alternative. I'll be at both.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
645 Tanner Marsh Road, Guilford, CT 06437
info@speedwitch.com
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912



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Re: Bob's photos

Fred in Vt. <pennsy@...>
 

Rich,

You're forgiven, and you can come back north anytime. Heck, I live in southern Vermont, and snow season is the best time to sit in a warm shop & build away. Springfield must be doing something right, there is a waiting list of 60 vendors who want to attend.
Plus, it helps to have the major NE cities close by too.
If you get to really missing the place, I could always send a snowball in a cryo-pac !! <LOL>

Fred Freitas

----- Original Message -----
From: Richard Hendrickson
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, August 24, 2005 11:47 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] RE: Bob's photos


On Aug 24, 2005, at 8:35 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
>
> Springfield Massachusetts, Tony... in January. Bob has several hundred
> books, and chairs to sit on. And there are other excellent photo
> dealers
> there too.

Springfield, Mass. in January? When Cocoa Beach, Fla. is an
alternative? Give me, as we say, a break. The Springfield meet is all
very well for those who already live in the area, but I spent three
winters in New England once and I ain't goin' back.

Richard Hendrickson



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Re: Bob's photos

armprem
 

Too bad Jeff,we shall miss you. I truly miss Springfield,but when one
looks at the disadvantages of spending the rest of the winter there,Cocoa
Beach wins in a heartbeatArmand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "englishintroy" <englij@rpi.edu>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2005 5:56 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Bob's photos


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@o...>
wrote:
Springfield, Mass. in January? When Cocoa Beach, Fla. is an
alternative? Give me, as we say, a break. The Springfield meet is
all
very well for those who already live in the area, but I spent three
winters in New England once and I ain't goin' back.
As always, I cannot let climate-ist statements like this go
ununaswered. I, for one, will take a northern winter (and the other
three seasons with it) over the wimp-appeal of the sunbelt. Look for
me at Springfield, but not at Cocoa Beach.

Jeff English
Troy, New York






Yahoo! Groups Links








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Re: Solid, Roller & Friction Bearing Journals

ljack70117@...
 

Amen Brother.
On Wednesday, August 24, 2005, at 11:38 PM, behillman wrote:

I have this very interesting book. It's entitled, "Railroad
Construction - Theory and Practice", by Prof. Walter L. Webb, C.E.,
and published in 1903.

This book covers EVERY aspect of railroad construction and operation
known then, and very well. It's defined as, "A text-book for the use
of students in colleges and technical schools." Published by: John
Wiley & Sons, NY, NY. 1903

Specifically, concerning the subject of "truck bearing journals",
the following is stated, under the section discussing, "Train-
Resistance";

"(b)Journal Friction of the Axles.

This form of resistance has been studied quite extensively by means
of the measurement of the force required to turn an axle in it's
bearings under various conditions of pressure, speed, extent of
lubrication and temperature."

(Long technical text)

Then;

"Roller journals for cars have been frequently suggested, and
experiments have been made with them. It is found that they are very
effective at low velocities, greatly reducing the starting
resistance, which is very high with the ordinary forms of journals.
But the advantages disappear as the velocity increases."

Throughout this long 675 page text, I have yet to find the
term "solid bearing". (But I'm not finished reading yet!) The only
terms found are "bearing-friction", "ordinary-journals" and "journal-
friction".

An interesting point though is the discussion in 1903 of, "Roller
Journals". Until now one might think that "Timken", et al, had
invented the roller-bearing in the '30's or '40's, but these old
boys were working on it like 30+ years earlier??

I'd think, that when the final advent of the roller-bearing came
into more popular being, that the term, "bearing-friction" was
swapped for "friction-bearing" in order to differentiate between the
two different approaches of starting-friction-reduction concepts. I
also don't think it would be erroneous for the RR men to pick up on
the change of terms themselves, either.

(I remember, in the '50's, the caboose-crews having to put their
feet up against the walls, or something, in order to brace for the
coming "jerk" when train-slack would be taken up because of the
engineer trying to get the whole train going because of high
starting resistance?) I would think that the RR men knew what terms
they'd chosen to use correctly.

Paul Hillman









Yahoo! Groups Links






Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net
The 50-50-90 Rule: Anytime you have 50-50 chance of getting something right, there is 90% probability you'll get it wrong.


Re: Bob's photos

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Aug 24, 2005, at 11:47 PM, Richard Hendrickson wrote:

On Aug 24, 2005, at 8:35 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:

Springfield Massachusetts, Tony... in January. Bob has several hundred
books, and chairs to sit on. And there are other excellent photo
dealers
there too.
Springfield, Mass. in January? When Cocoa Beach, Fla. is an
alternative? Give me, as we say, a break. The Springfield meet is all
very well for those who already live in the area, but I spent three
winters in New England once and I ain't goin' back.
Richard:

I'll agree with your assessment of the weather, but it is the best train show in the country, bar none. Now, if you have everything you need, as you do or are close to, then Cocoa Beach is a far better alternative. I'll be at both.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
645 Tanner Marsh Road, Guilford, CT 06437
info@speedwitch.com
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912


Re: Bob's photos

Jeff English
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@o...>
wrote:
Springfield, Mass. in January? When Cocoa Beach, Fla. is an
alternative? Give me, as we say, a break. The Springfield meet is
all
very well for those who already live in the area, but I spent three
winters in New England once and I ain't goin' back.
As always, I cannot let climate-ist statements like this go
ununaswered. I, for one, will take a northern winter (and the other
three seasons with it) over the wimp-appeal of the sunbelt. Look for
me at Springfield, but not at Cocoa Beach.

Jeff English
Troy, New York


Re: dutch drop

Thomas M. Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

Back in 1965 and 1966, when I was a new operator on the PRR's
Philadelphia Division I worked a lot of days at Hook Block Station in
Marcus Hook, Pa., on the Philadelphia-Washington Main Line. Across from
the tower was the Congoleum Corporation plant which was switched twice a
day, seven days a week. There were at least three sidings into the
plant off No. 5 track which accessed a number of industries between
Thurlow Yard and a point about a mile south of the interlocking.

There were many days when the yard crew had cars ahead and behind the
engine when working this plant and it was ineveitable that they would
have to "swing" (a.k.a. a "Dutch Drop") a car to get it into the plant
to a point where they could go against it to spot it inside the
building. In the many times that I witnessed this move, they never had
a derailment or a "run in" with the equipment. Yes, this type of move
was frowned upon by management due to the precision that it took to make
the move. One error in judgment of timing and either you had a
derailment, a cornering of the equipment, a run-through switch, or
possibly an employee injury if there was a derailment. The crews that I
worked with as an operator, all had worked with each other for a long
time and had a lot of experience in making this tyoe of movement.

Tom Olsen
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479



ljack70117@adelphia.net wrote:

Some times you only have one switch and it is a trailing point switch.
Or you can keep it on the wrong end of your engine and "foot board" it
until you find a run around track.
It was fronded upon by the RRs.
On Wednesday, August 24, 2005, at 07:34 PM, Ned Carey wrote:



Now for the fun and games. A "DUTCH drop". You want to get the car
to
the other end of your engine but you have a trailing point switch.

Why would you even want to do a "dutch drop"?

The goal is to get the car to the other end of the engine. What reasons
would there be to do that other than to switch a facing point switch.
If you
are going to do a facing point move, why not just do the regular drop?

Ned

Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net
You can't have everything. Where would you put it?





Yahoo! Groups Links








Re: dutch drop

Tom Jones III <tomtherailnut@...>
 

The Dutch drop was to get the car from the north end of the engine to the
south end (for example), but without a run-around. So, the moving car was
allowed to roll past the locomotive that has run away from the rolling car,
stopped, reversed, thrown the switch, and run into what was a trailing point
switch. The switch is then thrown again and the car rolls past, putting the
car at the other end of the locomotive. The locomotive now throws the
switch, runs out of the spur, catches the rolling boxcar (or the brakeman
has stopped it), and the train reassembled.

As for why - if there is switching to be done, and there is no way to get
the car to the other end of the train except to travel several miles to a
run around, well, many crews won't suffer along with spending literally
hours running to a run-around just to run back. Hence, the Dutch drop.

Tom

----- Original Message -----
Subject: Re: [STMFC] dutch drop


Now for the fun and games. A "DUTCH drop". You want to get the car to
the other end of your engine but you have a trailing point switch.
Why would you even want to do a "dutch drop"?

The goal is to get the car to the other end of the engine. What reasons
would there be to do that other than to switch a facing point switch. If
you
are going to do a facing point move, why not just do the regular drop?


Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It

Eric
 

Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It

Tom Jones wrote:

"Electronic throttles are great - until you want to simulate momentum effects in the rolling stock,
not locomotives, as was the topic of the thread. In specific, we were discussing how to make a
boxcar or other freight car appear to be of the same mass as the prototype. This would include being
able to "dutch drop" the car, have the car roll down a hump and into a marshalling yard at
prototypical speeds and all the way to the end of the track, etc. Our models may be excellent
physical representations of the real thing, but they operate like toys because friction remains a
real constant and does not scale down. Hence, the thrust of the thread was how to overcome
the effects of friction so that the models would appear to be real in their actions and reactions."

How are you planning to overcome the laws of physics? It seems to me that the only way to mimic the
way scale cars move would be to DCC power them all and have the prototype movement you want to mimic
hardwired into the controller. This obviously brings it's own problems until a cheap traction motor
style wheel set that can be installed into freight and passenger car trucks and a like sized decoder
is available. Of course that path gives us the opportunity to be able to 'set' the brakes of the
model on grades and perhaps have operating couplers.

Until that happens I don't think there's a way to make free rolling scale cars approach the movement
of real cars.

Then after accomplishing this you run into the problem of how our layouts aren't actual scale
models, in fact most don't even approach being scale. Most are so drastically foreshortened that a
1:1 freight car's dynamics when scaled down acting under the forces of momentum would roll much
farther than most of our sidings and yards are long. A freight taking a mile to stop would take how
many dozen laps of most of our layouts to achieve that? That's if you don't have a point to point,
in that case it just goes over the edge because the world is flat. Here there be dragons and they
find model railroad equipment to be tasty. That's why it keeps disappearing off the edge of the
layout, never to be seen again. :-)

The more you try to mimic the prototype the more you end up demonstrating the reality that our
models are basically toys, well, expensive toys.


Eric Petersson




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Accurate Paint Schemes on the Accurail 40' Wood Boxcars?

ogdentowebercanyon
 

I am trying to figure out which Accurail 40' Wood sided boxcars are pretty close to accurate and which paint schemes are legitimate paint schemes? I am interested in the 4300, 4500, 7100, and the 7000 series cars. I know some manufacturers, especially Walthers, like to paint up their cars in the roadnames that generate the most revenue even if the actual road never had them. Given the Accurail car is only $10 I have accepted the fact that there is probably some faults with the cars and the detail is not similar to Intermountain or Red Caboose so as long as they can pass for good stand-ins with accurate paint schemes then I am fine with that. I need some cars to fill out my roster and add some variety. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Jason Sanford



---------------------------------
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Re: Bob's photos

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Aug 24, 2005, at 8:35 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:

Springfield Massachusetts, Tony... in January. Bob has several hundred
books, and chairs to sit on. And there are other excellent photo dealers
there too.
Springfield, Mass. in January? When Cocoa Beach, Fla. is an alternative? Give me, as we say, a break. The Springfield meet is all very well for those who already live in the area, but I spent three winters in New England once and I ain't goin' back.

Richard Hendrickson


Solid, Roller & Friction Bearing Journals

Paul Hillman
 

I have this very interesting book. It's entitled, "Railroad
Construction - Theory and Practice", by Prof. Walter L. Webb, C.E.,
and published in 1903.

This book covers EVERY aspect of railroad construction and operation
known then, and very well. It's defined as, "A text-book for the use
of students in colleges and technical schools." Published by: John
Wiley & Sons, NY, NY. 1903

Specifically, concerning the subject of "truck bearing journals",
the following is stated, under the section discussing, "Train-
Resistance";

"(b)Journal Friction of the Axles.

This form of resistance has been studied quite extensively by means
of the measurement of the force required to turn an axle in it's
bearings under various conditions of pressure, speed, extent of
lubrication and temperature."

(Long technical text)

Then;

"Roller journals for cars have been frequently suggested, and
experiments have been made with them. It is found that they are very
effective at low velocities, greatly reducing the starting
resistance, which is very high with the ordinary forms of journals.
But the advantages disappear as the velocity increases."

Throughout this long 675 page text, I have yet to find the
term "solid bearing". (But I'm not finished reading yet!) The only
terms found are "bearing-friction", "ordinary-journals" and "journal-
friction".

An interesting point though is the discussion in 1903 of, "Roller
Journals". Until now one might think that "Timken", et al, had
invented the roller-bearing in the '30's or '40's, but these old
boys were working on it like 30+ years earlier??

I'd think, that when the final advent of the roller-bearing came
into more popular being, that the term, "bearing-friction" was
swapped for "friction-bearing" in order to differentiate between the
two different approaches of starting-friction-reduction concepts. I
also don't think it would be erroneous for the RR men to pick up on
the change of terms themselves, either.

(I remember, in the '50's, the caboose-crews having to put their
feet up against the walls, or something, in order to brace for the
coming "jerk" when train-slack would be taken up because of the
engineer trying to get the whole train going because of high
starting resistance?) I would think that the RR men knew what terms
they'd chosen to use correctly.

Paul Hillman


Re: Bob's photos

Tim O'Connor
 

He suspected they were scanning them or using them for a modeling
project and returning the photos when the project was completed.
Several photo sellers have reported this. It's a shame that a few
take advantage of dealers, and it cuts off mail ordering for everyone.
But I suppose it just makes one more reason ya gotta go to Cocoa Beach
and Naperville <g>.
Tony Thompson
Springfield Massachusetts, Tony... in January. Bob has several hundred
books, and chairs to sit on. And there are other excellent photo dealers
there too.

139081 - 139100 of 183658