Date   

Re: Kodak - Slightly Off Topic...but Only Slightly.

vgnry <vgnry212@...>
 

A T Kott wrote:

It is my understanding that a single 35mm black and white negative
holds the equivalent of 80 megapixels of data in "analog" form
(actually, it is digital when you get down to the molecular level).
A single 2-1/4" X 2-1/4" B&W negative holds 150 megapixels of data.
The negative is also a much better way to store data archivally -
the compact disc technology will probably be long obsolete, while
B&W negatives will still be great. I also understand that a digital
image on a compact disc will only last for about 20 years before it
needs to be removed and placed on new media. Maybe by then, a more
permanent form of storage will have been invented. A digital
picture can be transferred as a jpeg file several times before it
starts to break up - but when it does start to break up, it goes
away in spectacular fashion.


Just another example of instant gratification over craftsmanship and
quality!
I am way off topic here, but I wanted to make a few of observations about this thread:

1. I have many old and wonderful postcard and 616 size B&W negs of railroad
subjects...and absolutely no way to have them printed other than scanning/digitizing. So
longevity may well mean nothing if you can't use the stuff.

2. The idea expressed on this list several times that a well made digital 8X10 won't
measure up to a traditional wet darkroom print is simply rubbish. I have digital prints from
the Otto Perry collection that are fabulous. It all depends on what you start with and what
you do with it. A poorly made print is a poorly made print, whether wet or digital.

3. A JPG file can be transferred, that is to say moved arouund, without degrading the file. it
cannot be repeatedly resaved as a JPG because the saving process recompresses the file
each time, ultimately degrading the file.

The 'instant gratification' shot is beyond belief. The implication that all of the many
publications produced digitally, including railroad publications, not to mention the train
calendars we buy and the historical society publications that could only be done by
desktop publishing software using digitally produced images, are not the product of
craftsmanship and quality...well, what can I say....

There was a day when folks said a resin kit could never match the quality of an injection
molded model.

Bill McClure
Richmond


Drops and Journal Bearings

George Gounley <gounleys@...>
 

1. I rode the MoP's Doniphan, MO branch in the late winter or early spring of 1974. We arrived at Doniphan with 21-23 empty gondolas for tie loading. The runaround track was out of service because of either switch or subgrade problems at the far end: I can't recall at this remove. The crew took advantage of the topography to put the engine on the siding and drop the entire train. I was greatly impressed, but it was routine for the crew. The MoP generally had superb trackwork, but they told me that the runaround had been out of service for several months.

2. I once worked with a fellow who grew up near Pottsville, PA. He told me that on a number of occasions as a teenager he 'earned' spending money during the summer by stealing journal brass from Reading hoppers stored for the off-season. Apparently he was not the only one and the railroad had learned to send carmen to inspect the cars before ordering them in from storage tracks.


George Gounley
gounleys@earthlink.net


ADMIN: Warning. Subject and Scope

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Well, it looks like it's time for one of my little lectures about the use of the "subject" and the need to follow the rules. In this case, the one about messages needing to be about steam era frt cars.

So...before you send a message, take a look at the subject and see if your message is associated with the subject.

Next, unless your message is about frt cars...just don't send it. If you have a question about another subject that you think someone on the STMFC can answer, send it to me and I'll make the judgement to send it to the entire group.

If you do happen to address the membership with a subject unrelated to the subject matter of the group [ which has been sent to you ], please have the courtesy to take discussions with those that might have replied OFF LINE.

Now...just so there aren't any surprises, the Head Judge [ me ] is in chambers and will be issuing warrants to the HIgh Sheriff [ me ] to serve on those that ignore the decree outlined above. The last several months have seen much too much sloppiness in message identification and staying within scope. Thanks.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: resin exposure

Tim O'Connor
 

It's really too bad Martin and Al can't/won't come to the
Springfield. I can only imagine the impact it would have to
have their respective excellent displays for 20,000 visitors
to see. I am sure that most visitors have no idea that such
products exist in such prolific variety and wonderful quality.
They might help to recruit a couple score more people into the
ranks of "true believers" just by showing up.

Tim O.


Re: Bob's photos

Fred in Vt. <pennsy@...>
 

Rich,

Let me take this one step further, if you don't mind. When a car is resided with steel over the Z bracing, does the ORER still list it as Z braced?
The fellow in question is a Mopac modeler, and is having issues with photos matching nember series. I'm a PRR modeler, and all I know about MP is the express & 10-6 sleepers in pool service.

Fred Freitas

----- Original Message -----
From: Richard Hendrickson
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, August 26, 2005 8:30 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] RE: Bob's photos


On Aug 26, 2005, at 4:13 PM, Fred in Vt. wrote:

> I'm trying to find an answer for a fellow modeler up here, and
> I did not have a clue to the right explanaton. Would one the more
> knowledgable please indulge me with the difference between Z bracing,
> and what some call "exteral bracing". Not to be confused with hat
> section structural members. It's one of those things I should know,
> and can't recall it. Drat !!!

At last! A genuine freight car question. "External bracing" or, more
correctly, "external framing" is any method of house car construction
in which the framing is outside the sheathing. In the steam era, this
was common to what are properly described as single sheathed cars (NOT
"outside braced," a term that was never used in the RR industry). Such
cars had a single layer of (usually) wood sheathing applied inside the
body framing, which could be either hat section (usually Pratt truss,
with the diagonals in compression) or Z section (usually Howe truss,
with the diagonals in tension).



SPONSORED LINKS Train travel Freight car Canada train travel
Train travel in italy North american


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Re: Kodak - Slightly Off Topic...but Only Slightly.

Paul Hillman
 

Thanks A.T.,

I'd generally understood that water would separate prints, but was just wondering about any of the modern-marvels about such. I have some really good photos of the D&RGW narrow gauge in Durango and Chama, and other RR's, and they've gotten "stuck-together" over a time of storage. Don't want to lose their essence by experimentation.

Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: proto48er<mailto:atkott@swbell.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, August 26, 2005 5:54 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Kodak - Slightly Off Topic...but Only Slightly.


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>, "Paul Hillman" <chris_hillman@m<mailto:chris_hillman@m>...>
wrote:
> Yeah, not quite sure what the current, real quality of digital is,
(short of a $3,000.00 digital camera, etc.), but it looks like
the "old" print system is definitely on the way out. I used to
develop my own film and prints a few years back. I still have a 35mm
SLR and love it.
>
> But, I have another film OT question; what's the best way to
separate print-film pictures that are stuck together?
>
> Paul Hillman


Paul - I think you might try soaking the print film pictures in
distilled water - they were developed in water in the first place.
They should separate.

It is my understanding that a single 35mm black and white negative
holds the equivalent of 80 megapixels of data in "analog" form
(actually, it is digital when you get down to the molecular level).
A single 2-1/4" X 2-1/4" B&W negative holds 150 megapixels of data.
The negative is also a much better way to store data archivally -
the compact disc technology will probably be long obsolete, while
B&W negatives will still be great. I also understand that a digital
image on a compact disc will only last for about 20 years before it
needs to be removed and placed on new media. Maybe by then, a more
permanent form of storage will have been invented. A digital
picture can be transferred as a jpeg file several times before it
starts to break up - but when it does start to break up, it goes
away in spectacular fashion.

The above info comes from various articles in "Photo Techniques"
magazine. They are somewhat impartial - also do research on digital
and new wet photography films and papers.

Just another example of instant gratification over craftsmanship and
quality! A.T. Kott






Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: OT stuck photos

Paul Hillman
 

Thanks, "ex-dark room guy",

I seem to remember something about glycol also. But it's been such a long time that I sometimes can't remember my own name.

Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: Allen Rueter<mailto:allen@artsci.wustl.edu>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, August 26, 2005 5:54 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] OT stuck photos


Paul,
Soak them in water till they seperate, you will lose the glossy finish.
You will need a towel and some books to dry them flat.
If you know a person who does there own prints or a lab, they may have a
print dryer with the polished metal plate to get the gloss back.

Good luck. ex-darkroom guy.

On Fri, Aug 26, 2005 at 03:06:17PM -0500, Paul Hillman wrote:
8<
> But, I have another film OT question; what's the best way to separate print-film pictures that are stuck together?
>


--
------
Allen P Rueter Phone: 314/935-6429 email allen :) artsci.wustl.edu
.oO* there are at least three sides to every issue.





Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It

Rob & Bev Manley
 

Roger,
They did and I had one. The flywheel was powered by a rubberband to a plastic drum pulley mounted on one of the axles. It performed much like a rubberband. Most of my cars have Interrmountain standard or semi fine scale wheelsets and they mimic the momentum better than the flywheel gimic. If you pre-pposition your Kadees so that they will not couple, you can with practice, switch on the fly.
Real brakemen don't use uncoupling magnets,
Rob Manley

----- Original Message -----
From: Roger Parry
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, August 26, 2005 5:32 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It


Did not NWSL offer a flywheel chassis that could be used with an Athern
box car to simulate train momentum?
On Aug 26, 2005, at 12:27 PM, Tom Jones III wrote:

> My thoughts were motorized momentum in the cars, or flywheel driven
> momentum
> in the cars. DCC is too much for individual cars when it is possible to
> simply (yeah, right!) have the car sense its own speed and through a
> computer program onboard the car control the momentum motor that
> drives the
> wheels, or provides resistance. A flywheel may be a lot easier, not
> sure
> about cheaper. It would provide a sort of brake when stopped, but it
> certainly would push the train along when moving!
>
> Tom Jones III
>
> ----- Original Message -----
>> Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It
>>
> (snip)
>> Then after accomplishing this you run into the problem of how our
>> layouts
> aren't actual scale
>> models, in fact most don't even approach being scale. Most are so
> drastically foreshortened that a
>> 1:1 freight car's dynamics when scaled down acting under the forces of
> momentum would roll much
>> farther than most of our sidings and yards are long. A freight taking
>> a
> mile to stop would take how
>> many dozen laps of most of our layouts to achieve that? That's if you
> don't have a point to point,
>> in that case it just goes over the edge because the world is flat.
>> Here
> there be dragons and they
>> find model railroad equipment to be tasty. That's why it keeps
> disappearing off the edge of the
>> layout, never to be seen again. :-)
>>
>> The more you try to mimic the prototype the more you end up
>> demonstrating
> the reality that our
>> models are basically toys, well, expensive toys.
>
>
>
>
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>
>
>



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Re: Kodak - Slightly Off Topic...but Only Slightly.

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

It is my understanding that a single 35mm black and white negative
holds the equivalent of 80 megapixels of data in "analog" form
(actually, it is digital when you get down to the molecular level).
A single 2-1/4" X 2-1/4" B&W negative holds 150 megapixels of data.
Sort of. This is ONLY true if the negative is crystal sharp. The great majority, especially 35 mm, are far from truly sharp. In such a case the INFORMATION content may not exceed 5 MB, regardless of how many silver grains there are.

The negative is also a much better way to store data archivally -
the compact disc technology will probably be long obsolete, while
B&W negatives will still be great. I also understand that a digital
image on a compact disc will only last for about 20 years before it
needs to be removed and placed on new media.
I'd agree about the longevity of negatives--same is true of paper records. As for how long a CD will last, well, realistically, no one really knows yet. They certainly ARE subject to heat and humidity: you can add them to the very long list of things best stored in a cool, dry place. (inevitably reminds me of the great Traveling Wilburys song on that topic . . . )

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Bob's photos

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Aug 26, 2005, at 4:13 PM, Fred in Vt. wrote:

I'm trying to find an answer for a fellow modeler up here, and I did not have a clue to the right explanaton. Would one the more knowledgable please indulge me with the difference between Z bracing, and what some call "exteral bracing". Not to be confused with hat section structural members. It's one of those things I should know, and can't recall it. Drat !!!
At last! A genuine freight car question. "External bracing" or, more correctly, "external framing" is any method of house car construction in which the framing is outside the sheathing. In the steam era, this was common to what are properly described as single sheathed cars (NOT "outside braced," a term that was never used in the RR industry). Such cars had a single layer of (usually) wood sheathing applied inside the body framing, which could be either hat section (usually Pratt truss, with the diagonals in compression) or Z section (usually Howe truss, with the diagonals in tension).


Re: Bob's photos

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

In fairness to Martin, I would not pay up front & not have a guaranteed spot on the floor. Some folks are getting over-inflated, and need a reality check.
As for Al, that was a nightmare. . . .
I wasn't quibbling about the reason(s), just pointing out the absence.

I'm trying to find an answer for a fellow modeler up here, and I did not have a clue to the right explanaton. Would one the more knowledgable please indulge me with the difference between Z bracing, and what some call "exteral bracing". Not to be confused with hat section structural members. It's one of those things I should know, and can't recall it.
The cross-section of one is kind of a hat (inverted U), the other is a Z.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: The Springfield Show

armprem
 

Tim,I always looked forward to Steve's display of milk cars at
Springfield.No question ,Steve is ahead of the curve.I didn't mean to imply
that all_ the good modelers attended RPM meets....,just some of the
best....Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@comcast.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2005 10:53 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] The Springfield Show



Armand Premo wrote

The seminars are super with presentations by some of the best
modelers in the country ...
I don't need to point this out to most of you, but not ALL of the
best modelers in the country are into the "RPM scene". There are many
fabulous models on display at Springfield (as there are at regional
shows and meets all over the country). One of my favorite displays
at Springfield is the Pfaudler tables, where superb, scratchbuilt
models of milk trains are on display. And way back in 1989 before
I even knew my A end from a B end, I was awestruck by a Prototype
Modelers' display led by Steve Solombrino, a great modeler who to
my knowledge has never attended a single RPM meet. RPM meets only
attract 1% or less of model railroaders -- you can be sure you are
missing out on a lot of great modeling if that's all you do.

Tim O'Connor






Yahoo! Groups Links









--
No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.344 / Virus Database: 267.10.15/81 - Release Date: 8/24/05


Re: Bob's photos

Fred in Vt. <pennsy@...>
 

Tony,

In fairness to Martin, I would not pay up front & not have a guaranteed spot on the floor. Some folks are getting over-inflated, and need a reality check.
As for Al, that was a nightmare. Al & Patricia waited till the next day to head home; just in time for a 20 some inch snow fall. IIRC, they had soda cans explode in their vehicle from the -10 temps.
Mrs. westerfield may be from Vermont, but Al does NOT DO SNOW. Have no reason to feel deprived by his decision, I can order on line.
For those who may never have operated in snow------it's different!!!
Now back to the regular programming >>>>>.

I'm trying to find an answer for a fellow modeler up here, and I did not have a clue to the right explanaton. Would one the more knowledgable please indulge me with the difference between Z bracing, and what some call "exteral bracing". Not to be confused with hat section structural members. It's one of those things I should know, and can't recall it. Drat !!!
Thanks.......

Fred Freitas

----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, August 26, 2005 12:37 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] RE: Bob's photos


Thomas M. Olsen wrote:

> Springfield may have a waiting list of vendors, but they when they
> finally select a vendor to fill a spot, apparently they won't guarantee
> the table space until the vendor arrives to set up. Martin Lofton has
> been asked to attend as a vendor a number of times . . .

And Westerfield has told us he went once and isn't going again.
So Springfield isn't exactly presenting "all the big resin producers."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


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Re: OT stuck photos

Allen Rueter <allen@...>
 

Paul,
Soak them in water till they seperate, you will lose the glossy finish.
You will need a towel and some books to dry them flat.
If you know a person who does there own prints or a lab, they may have a
print dryer with the polished metal plate to get the gloss back.

Good luck. ex-darkroom guy.

On Fri, Aug 26, 2005 at 03:06:17PM -0500, Paul Hillman wrote:
8<
But, I have another film OT question; what's the best way to separate print-film pictures that are stuck together?

--
------
Allen P Rueter Phone: 314/935-6429 email allen :) artsci.wustl.edu
.oO* there are at least three sides to every issue.


Re: Kodak - Slightly Off Topic...but Only Slightly.

proto48er
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Hillman" <chris_hillman@m...>
wrote:
Yeah, not quite sure what the current, real quality of digital is,
(short of a $3,000.00 digital camera, etc.), but it looks like
the "old" print system is definitely on the way out. I used to
develop my own film and prints a few years back. I still have a 35mm
SLR and love it.

But, I have another film OT question; what's the best way to
separate print-film pictures that are stuck together?

Paul Hillman

Paul - I think you might try soaking the print film pictures in
distilled water - they were developed in water in the first place.
They should separate.

It is my understanding that a single 35mm black and white negative
holds the equivalent of 80 megapixels of data in "analog" form
(actually, it is digital when you get down to the molecular level).
A single 2-1/4" X 2-1/4" B&W negative holds 150 megapixels of data.
The negative is also a much better way to store data archivally -
the compact disc technology will probably be long obsolete, while
B&W negatives will still be great. I also understand that a digital
image on a compact disc will only last for about 20 years before it
needs to be removed and placed on new media. Maybe by then, a more
permanent form of storage will have been invented. A digital
picture can be transferred as a jpeg file several times before it
starts to break up - but when it does start to break up, it goes
away in spectacular fashion.

The above info comes from various articles in "Photo Techniques"
magazine. They are somewhat impartial - also do research on digital
and new wet photography films and papers.

Just another example of instant gratification over craftsmanship and
quality! A.T. Kott


Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It

Roger Parry <uncleroger@...>
 

Did not NWSL offer a flywheel chassis that could be used with an Athern box car to simulate train momentum?

On Aug 26, 2005, at 12:27 PM, Tom Jones III wrote:

My thoughts were motorized momentum in the cars, or flywheel driven momentum
in the cars. DCC is too much for individual cars when it is possible to
simply (yeah, right!) have the car sense its own speed and through a
computer program onboard the car control the momentum motor that drives the
wheels, or provides resistance. A flywheel may be a lot easier, not sure
about cheaper. It would provide a sort of brake when stopped, but it
certainly would push the train along when moving!

Tom Jones III

----- Original Message -----
Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It
(snip)
Then after accomplishing this you run into the problem of how our layouts
aren't actual scale
models, in fact most don't even approach being scale. Most are so
drastically foreshortened that a
1:1 freight car's dynamics when scaled down acting under the forces of
momentum would roll much
farther than most of our sidings and yards are long. A freight taking a
mile to stop would take how
many dozen laps of most of our layouts to achieve that? That's if you
don't have a point to point,
in that case it just goes over the edge because the world is flat. Here
there be dragons and they
find model railroad equipment to be tasty. That's why it keeps
disappearing off the edge of the
layout, never to be seen again. :-)

The more you try to mimic the prototype the more you end up demonstrating
the reality that our
models are basically toys, well, expensive toys.




Yahoo! Groups Links







Re: Kodak - Slightly Off Topic...but Only Slightly.

Paul Hillman
 

Yeah, not quite sure what the current, real quality of digital is, (short of a $3,000.00 digital camera, etc.), but it looks like the "old" print system is definitely on the way out. I used to develop my own film and prints a few years back. I still have a 35mm SLR and love it.

But, I have another film OT question; what's the best way to separate print-film pictures that are stuck together?

Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: Beckert, Shawn<mailto:shawn.beckert@disney.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, August 26, 2005 2:26 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Kodak - Slightly Off Topic...but Only Slightly.


Guys,

This article is taken from USA Today. You might want to take a look:

http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/technology/2005-08-25-kodak-cuts_x.htm<http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/technology/2005-08-25-kodak-cuts_x.htm>

The freight car connection should be obvious. If things keep going the way they
are, there might not *be* a Bob's Photo in a few years. Or John C. LaRue, or Jay
Williams. etc. Not to be Chicken Little (hey, there's an idea for a movie), but
it looks like we better start buying photographs like crazy or we find someone
who still makes printing paper (and chemicals) and work out a deal.

At some point we'll be forced to accept digitally printed photos. I already have
some, and I'm just not impressed.Unless the quality of digital printing improves
drastically (and who knows, maybe it will), I think we're in for a dry spell as
far as this facet of our hobby goes.

This is not meant to stir a debate (which will get Mike upset), but I think people
here should be aware of what's coming. Not a pretty picture - no pun intended.

Shawn Beckert





Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Kodak - Slightly Off Topic...but Only Slightly.

Adam Maas <mykroft@...>
 

Beckert, Shawn wrote:
Guys,
This article is taken from USA Today. You might want to take a look:
http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/technology/2005-08-25-kodak-cuts_x.htm
The freight car connection should be obvious. If things keep going the way they
are, there might not *be* a Bob's Photo in a few years. Or John C. LaRue, or Jay
Williams. etc. Not to be Chicken Little (hey, there's an idea for a movie), but
it looks like we better start buying photographs like crazy or we find someone who still makes printing paper (and chemicals) and work out a deal.
At some point we'll be forced to accept digitally printed photos. I already have some, and I'm just not impressed.Unless the quality of digital printing improves drastically (and who knows, maybe it will), I think we're in for a dry spell as
far as this facet of our hobby goes.
This is not meant to stir a debate (which will get Mike upset), but I think people here should be aware of what's coming. Not a pretty picture - no pun intended.
Shawn Beckert
If you're getting your photos printed at a minilab, you're already getting digital prints. All the modern minilabs scan the negs and then print digitally to photo paper. This side of the business is not declining much, but kodak isn't as big a player as it used to be, with Fuji leading and Noritsu and Agfa also playing. The major change here is simply in volume, most folks now come in and print 75+ digital shots rather than a roll at a time.

Film however is dead from a mainstream perspective. It will be the domain of the artist and purist within a coupel of years (From a new sales perspective, film cameras essentially died in 2004, the P&S market is gone and the SLR market is dying).

-Adam


Kodak - Slightly Off Topic...but Only Slightly.

Shawn Beckert
 

Guys,

This article is taken from USA Today. You might want to take a look:

http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/technology/2005-08-25-kodak-cuts_x.htm

The freight car connection should be obvious. If things keep going the way they
are, there might not *be* a Bob's Photo in a few years. Or John C. LaRue, or Jay
Williams. etc. Not to be Chicken Little (hey, there's an idea for a movie), but
it looks like we better start buying photographs like crazy or we find someone
who still makes printing paper (and chemicals) and work out a deal.

At some point we'll be forced to accept digitally printed photos. I already have
some, and I'm just not impressed.Unless the quality of digital printing improves
drastically (and who knows, maybe it will), I think we're in for a dry spell as
far as this facet of our hobby goes.

This is not meant to stir a debate (which will get Mike upset), but I think people
here should be aware of what's coming. Not a pretty picture - no pun intended.

Shawn Beckert


Re: Kaslo double dutch drop

Paul Hillman
 

I can just imagine the stories from the steep-incline, multiple-
grade, multiple switch-back logging railroads, about these "Double-
Dutch-Drops", IE);

"Yeah, one day we tried a triple, double-Dutch-drop with a string of
10 fully-loaded log-cars and killed 20 men. Everything was OK until
old "cross-eyed Bob" the switchman couldn't tell which way the train
was goin' and switched her into the company mess-hall siding. Took
us a week to find the beer-cooler again."

Paul Hillman

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, PBowers <waiting@s...> wrote:
Canadian Pacific had an interesting "double dutch drop??" in Kaslo
and
probably one of the longest movements of tat type. The inbound
train left
the van on the mainline with brake on as it was an approx 2%
grade. The
loco and train pulled over the switch, reversed direction and then
went
down another approx 2% grade to the dock. Once the train was
clear, the
van brake was released and it rolled to the opposite end of the
yard which
was on a almost 5% grade. The van reversed direction and returned
back to
the switch down to the dock where the brakeman, after changing the
switch
to the dock track reboarded and rode the van down the grade
coasting to a
stop near the rest of the train. The length of track travelled
was about a
half mile.

Peter Bowers

143941 - 143960 of 188615