Date   

Re: Solid, Roller & Friction Bearing Journals

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Al Brown wrote:

A test was run, comparing its rolling
qualities to those of a sister car with friction bearings . . .
Tsk, tsk. Still using the term <g>.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: The Springfield Show

Tim O'Connor
 

I'm sold. It's a great show. When is it? Does it conflict with
Cocoa Beach?
Bill McCoy
Bill we can't discuss it any further. You can talk about Cocoa Beach,
hotels, and bars, and even warm Florida weather, but please don't say
anything about ... you know what.


Re: Solid, Roller & Friction Bearing Journals

al_brown03
 

In his Wheeling & Lake Erie book (p 59), John Corns shows three early
applications of roller bearings. In 1925, roller bearing arch bar
trucks were applied to a boxcar (one of those bizarre W&LE 27000-
series single-sheathed cars). A test was run, comparing its rolling
qualities to those of a sister car with friction bearings, which
suggests that said qualities weren't well known.

At the same time or a little earlier, roller bearing arch bars were
applied to a company-service flat car. The car was rebuilt from a
gondola in 1917; Corns doesn't say exactly when the roller bearing
trucks were applied.

Also in 1925, the Timken "lightweight inboard bearing truck" (looks
like a modern passenger-car truck) was applied to a W&LE "X29" box.

Apparently there was resistance to accept roller-bearing trucks in
interchange, hence they were applied more widely at first to passenger
equipment and cabooses than to freight cars.

Why W&LE? I *think* Timken, of Canton, Ohio, was a shipper.
Interesting W&LE got out front on this technology: they were said to
have the busiest unsignalled main line in the country, and were
notorious for not painting depots!

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@s...> wrote:
Bill Dixon wrote:
Although roller bearings we developed quite early I don't think the
metallurgical technology was up to producing the type of metals
needed
for railway quality bearings until around WW II.
Baloney. The steels used after the war for bearings are the
same
as in the 1920s. And the locomotives and cars which did receive
roller
bearings in the 1930s performed just fine. Railroads just didn't
choose
to use them (or perhaps, feel willing to pay for them).

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@s...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: The Springfield Show

Fred in Vt. <pennsy@...>
 

Bill,

There is an airport not far from springfield with bus service direct.
Fred F

----- Original Message -----
From: Ted Culotta
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, August 27, 2005 8:23 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: The Springfield Show



On Aug 27, 2005, at 7:08 AM, Bill McCoy wrote:

> I'm sold. It's a great show. When is it? Does it conflict with Cocoa
> Beach?
>

Here is the link to the page for the show on the Amherst Railway
Society web site. They organize the show. It's Jan. 28-29 this year.
http://www.amherstrail.org/show/show.htm

And if you want to sound like an out-of-towner from the get-go, call it
"Am-hearst". It's pronounced "Amerst". Make believe the "h" isn't
even there. For bonus points, Holyoke is pronounced "whole yoke", not
"holy oke".

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
645 Tanner Marsh Road, Guilford, CT 06437
info@...
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912



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Re: Bob's photos

Fred in Vt. <pennsy@...>
 

Tony,

Thanks for the info, now I can sit down with my confused friend, and hopefully get him through his Mopac withdrawl symtoms.

Fred F

----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, August 27, 2005 2:54 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] RE: Bob's photos


> Let me take this one step further, if you don't mind.
> When a car is resided with steel over the Z bracing, does the ORER
> still list it as Z braced?

No, nor does the ORER normally list Z braces. It would
probably say "all steel" instead of "steel frame" or "steel
underframe."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


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Re: The Springfield Show

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Aug 27, 2005, at 7:08 AM, Bill McCoy wrote:

I'm sold. It's a great show. When is it? Does it conflict with Cocoa
Beach?
Here is the link to the page for the show on the Amherst Railway Society web site. They organize the show. It's Jan. 28-29 this year. http://www.amherstrail.org/show/show.htm

And if you want to sound like an out-of-towner from the get-go, call it "Am-hearst". It's pronounced "Amerst". Make believe the "h" isn't even there. For bonus points, Holyoke is pronounced "whole yoke", not "holy oke".

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
645 Tanner Marsh Road, Guilford, CT 06437
info@...
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912


Thornton Waite

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

Does anyone know how to contact Thornton Waite, where he lives, etc.?

Thank you.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
645 Tanner Marsh Road, Guilford, CT 06437
info@...
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912


Re: The Springfield Show

Bill McCoy <bugsy451@...>
 

I'm sold. It's a great show. When is it? Does it conflict with Cocoa
Beach?

Bill McCoy
Jax

--- In STMFC@..., "armand" <armprem@s...> wrote:
Tim,I always looked forward to Steve's display of milk cars at
Springfield.No question ,Steve is ahead of the curve.I didn't
mean to imply
that all_ the good modelers attended RPM meets....,just some of the
best....Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
From: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@c...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2005 10:53 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] The Springfield Show



Armand Premo wrote

The seminars are super with presentations by some of the best
modelers in the country ...
I don't need to point this out to most of you, but not ALL of the
best modelers in the country are into the "RPM scene". There are
many
fabulous models on display at Springfield (as there are at
regional
shows and meets all over the country). One of my favorite
displays
at Springfield is the Pfaudler tables, where superb, scratchbuilt
models of milk trains are on display. And way back in 1989 before
I even knew my A end from a B end, I was awestruck by a Prototype
Modelers' display led by Steve Solombrino, a great modeler who to
my knowledge has never attended a single RPM meet. RPM meets only
attract 1% or less of model railroaders -- you can be sure you
are
missing out on a lot of great modeling if that's all you do.

Tim O'Connor






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Re: Solid, Roller & Friction Bearing Journals

Eric
 

Paul Hillman wrote:

"Something happened in later years for the ultimate conversion to roller-journals, probably a
significant reduction in costs in applying them to 100's of thousands of freight-cars?? (It's ALWAYS
about the "money".)"

Someone in accounting figured out that it was cheaper to use the bearings than it was to pay an
employee to maintain them. That they contributed to the resale value of the truck unlike money
'wasted' paying an employee maintaining them.

Eric Petersson





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Re: Solid, Roller & Friction Bearing Journals

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bill Dixon wrote:
Although roller bearings we developed quite early I don't think the
metallurgical technology was up to producing the type of metals needed
for railway quality bearings until around WW II.
Baloney. The steels used after the war for bearings are the same as in the 1920s. And the locomotives and cars which did receive roller bearings in the 1930s performed just fine. Railroads just didn't choose to use them (or perhaps, feel willing to pay for them).

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Bob's photos

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Let me take this one step further, if you don't mind. When a car is resided with steel over the Z bracing, does the ORER still list it as Z braced?
No, nor does the ORER normally list Z braces. It would probably say "all steel" instead of "steel frame" or "steel underframe."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Solid, Roller & Friction Bearing Journals

W.R.Dixon
 

Message: 8
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2005 11:14:42 -0500
From: "Tom Jones III" <tomtherailnut@...>
Subject: Re: Re: Solid, Roller & Friction Bearing Journals

More like the application of fuel prices and safety issues (i.e.,
liability claims) that moved railroads to roller bearings.
Except for their catastrophic failure mode roller bearings are better than friction bearings. Friction bearings advertise their pending failure for a long time. As friction bearings heat up they emit smoke from the overheated journal box that an alert train crew could often spot in time.

Roller bearing run until they fail, then they fail Right Now with little or no advance notice. They can run by a hot box detector with no problem and then fail in the next few miles. Because of this failure mode it is always a catastrophic failure. The blessing is that with the improved bearings we have today, the failure rate is very very low.

Although roller bearings we developed quite early I don't think the metallurgical technology was up to producing the type of metals needed for railway quality bearings until around WW II. War is a great technology accelerator and by the end of the war the metallurgical technology and production facilities were in place to produce the quality of bearings needed for railway use.

Bill Dixon


Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It

Roger Parry <uncleroger@...>
 

Amen to that! Real brakemen don't use magnets! They make the cut!

On Aug 26, 2005, at 8:52 PM, <@RobManley> wrote:

Roger,
They did and I had one. The flywheel was powered by a rubberband to a plastic drum pulley mounted on one of the axles. It performed much like a rubberband. Most of my cars have Interrmountain standard or semi fine scale wheelsets and they mimic the momentum better than the flywheel gimic. If you pre-pposition your Kadees so that they will not couple, you can with practice, switch on the fly.
Real brakemen don't use uncoupling magnets,
Rob Manley
----- Original Message -----
From: Roger Parry
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, August 26, 2005 5:32 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It


Did not NWSL offer a flywheel chassis that could be used with an Athern
box car to simulate train momentum?
On Aug 26, 2005, at 12:27 PM, Tom Jones III wrote:

My thoughts were motorized momentum in the cars, or flywheel driven
momentum
in the cars. DCC is too much for individual cars when it is possible to
simply (yeah, right!) have the car sense its own speed and through a
computer program onboard the car control the momentum motor that
drives the
wheels, or provides resistance. A flywheel may be a lot easier, not
sure
about cheaper. It would provide a sort of brake when stopped, but it
certainly would push the train along when moving!

Tom Jones III

----- Original Message -----
Re: Scale Weights - Doubt It
(snip)
Then after accomplishing this you run into the problem of how our
layouts
aren't actual scale
models, in fact most don't even approach being scale. Most are so
drastically foreshortened that a
1:1 freight car's dynamics when scaled down acting under the forces of
momentum would roll much
farther than most of our sidings and yards are long. A freight taking
a
mile to stop would take how
many dozen laps of most of our layouts to achieve that? That's if you
don't have a point to point,
in that case it just goes over the edge because the world is flat.
Here
there be dragons and they
find model railroad equipment to be tasty. That's why it keeps
disappearing off the edge of the
layout, never to be seen again. :-)

The more you try to mimic the prototype the more you end up
demonstrating
the reality that our
models are basically toys, well, expensive toys.




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RTR Resin-is Here now

Andy Carlson
 

Though N Scale, It appears to that the first
commercial Resin Boxcar is being released. GHQ, a
maker of very well done N scale items, has announced
production of NP 40' DS Fish Belly underframed 14000
series boxcars in RTR resin. this is to be followed by
an NP 90000 wood side reefer sometime later (Early 06
release). Close behind is a Canadian National 8 hatch
Reefer in series 209500-209999. these cars are cast
from patterns made by Gregory Scott, and are cast in
resin for the car body, and cast pewter for the fish
belly underframe. Assembly, painting and lettering are
done in China.

The importance of this, if a new trend, is that the
RTR aspect of the hobby is encroaching on the
currently 100% Kit territory of resin cars. Not that
this is bad, but this shows the hobby's continual
evolution.

I saw pre-production finished cars in San Diego last
week, and they are very well done. (Tony- this is
where you reply about "stick a fork. its done"!!!)

Though not cheap, at $39.95 per car ($149.95 4/pac),
they are a bargain for people desiring good finished
cars w/o the work. These cars will be available only
directly from GHQ 28100 Woodside Rd Shorewood MN
55331

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Kodak - Slightly Off Topic...but Only Slightly.

vgnry <vgnry212@...>
 

A T Kott wrote:

It is my understanding that a single 35mm black and white negative
holds the equivalent of 80 megapixels of data in "analog" form
(actually, it is digital when you get down to the molecular level).
A single 2-1/4" X 2-1/4" B&W negative holds 150 megapixels of data.
The negative is also a much better way to store data archivally -
the compact disc technology will probably be long obsolete, while
B&W negatives will still be great. I also understand that a digital
image on a compact disc will only last for about 20 years before it
needs to be removed and placed on new media. Maybe by then, a more
permanent form of storage will have been invented. A digital
picture can be transferred as a jpeg file several times before it
starts to break up - but when it does start to break up, it goes
away in spectacular fashion.


Just another example of instant gratification over craftsmanship and
quality!
I am way off topic here, but I wanted to make a few of observations about this thread:

1. I have many old and wonderful postcard and 616 size B&W negs of railroad
subjects...and absolutely no way to have them printed other than scanning/digitizing. So
longevity may well mean nothing if you can't use the stuff.

2. The idea expressed on this list several times that a well made digital 8X10 won't
measure up to a traditional wet darkroom print is simply rubbish. I have digital prints from
the Otto Perry collection that are fabulous. It all depends on what you start with and what
you do with it. A poorly made print is a poorly made print, whether wet or digital.

3. A JPG file can be transferred, that is to say moved arouund, without degrading the file. it
cannot be repeatedly resaved as a JPG because the saving process recompresses the file
each time, ultimately degrading the file.

The 'instant gratification' shot is beyond belief. The implication that all of the many
publications produced digitally, including railroad publications, not to mention the train
calendars we buy and the historical society publications that could only be done by
desktop publishing software using digitally produced images, are not the product of
craftsmanship and quality...well, what can I say....

There was a day when folks said a resin kit could never match the quality of an injection
molded model.

Bill McClure
Richmond


Drops and Journal Bearings

George Gounley <gounleys@...>
 

1. I rode the MoP's Doniphan, MO branch in the late winter or early spring of 1974. We arrived at Doniphan with 21-23 empty gondolas for tie loading. The runaround track was out of service because of either switch or subgrade problems at the far end: I can't recall at this remove. The crew took advantage of the topography to put the engine on the siding and drop the entire train. I was greatly impressed, but it was routine for the crew. The MoP generally had superb trackwork, but they told me that the runaround had been out of service for several months.

2. I once worked with a fellow who grew up near Pottsville, PA. He told me that on a number of occasions as a teenager he 'earned' spending money during the summer by stealing journal brass from Reading hoppers stored for the off-season. Apparently he was not the only one and the railroad had learned to send carmen to inspect the cars before ordering them in from storage tracks.


George Gounley
gounleys@...


ADMIN: Warning. Subject and Scope

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Well, it looks like it's time for one of my little lectures about the use of the "subject" and the need to follow the rules. In this case, the one about messages needing to be about steam era frt cars.

So...before you send a message, take a look at the subject and see if your message is associated with the subject.

Next, unless your message is about frt cars...just don't send it. If you have a question about another subject that you think someone on the STMFC can answer, send it to me and I'll make the judgement to send it to the entire group.

If you do happen to address the membership with a subject unrelated to the subject matter of the group [ which has been sent to you ], please have the courtesy to take discussions with those that might have replied OFF LINE.

Now...just so there aren't any surprises, the Head Judge [ me ] is in chambers and will be issuing warrants to the HIgh Sheriff [ me ] to serve on those that ignore the decree outlined above. The last several months have seen much too much sloppiness in message identification and staying within scope. Thanks.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: resin exposure

Tim O'Connor
 

It's really too bad Martin and Al can't/won't come to the
Springfield. I can only imagine the impact it would have to
have their respective excellent displays for 20,000 visitors
to see. I am sure that most visitors have no idea that such
products exist in such prolific variety and wonderful quality.
They might help to recruit a couple score more people into the
ranks of "true believers" just by showing up.

Tim O.


Re: Bob's photos

Fred in Vt. <pennsy@...>
 

Rich,

Let me take this one step further, if you don't mind. When a car is resided with steel over the Z bracing, does the ORER still list it as Z braced?
The fellow in question is a Mopac modeler, and is having issues with photos matching nember series. I'm a PRR modeler, and all I know about MP is the express & 10-6 sleepers in pool service.

Fred Freitas

----- Original Message -----
From: Richard Hendrickson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, August 26, 2005 8:30 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] RE: Bob's photos


On Aug 26, 2005, at 4:13 PM, Fred in Vt. wrote:

> I'm trying to find an answer for a fellow modeler up here, and
> I did not have a clue to the right explanaton. Would one the more
> knowledgable please indulge me with the difference between Z bracing,
> and what some call "exteral bracing". Not to be confused with hat
> section structural members. It's one of those things I should know,
> and can't recall it. Drat !!!

At last! A genuine freight car question. "External bracing" or, more
correctly, "external framing" is any method of house car construction
in which the framing is outside the sheathing. In the steam era, this
was common to what are properly described as single sheathed cars (NOT
"outside braced," a term that was never used in the RR industry). Such
cars had a single layer of (usually) wood sheathing applied inside the
body framing, which could be either hat section (usually Pratt truss,
with the diagonals in compression) or Z section (usually Howe truss,
with the diagonals in tension).



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Re: Kodak - Slightly Off Topic...but Only Slightly.

Paul Hillman
 

Thanks A.T.,

I'd generally understood that water would separate prints, but was just wondering about any of the modern-marvels about such. I have some really good photos of the D&RGW narrow gauge in Durango and Chama, and other RR's, and they've gotten "stuck-together" over a time of storage. Don't want to lose their essence by experimentation.

Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: proto48er<mailto:atkott@...>
To: STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC@...>
Sent: Friday, August 26, 2005 5:54 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Kodak - Slightly Off Topic...but Only Slightly.


--- In STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC@...>, "Paul Hillman" <chris_hillman@m<mailto:chris_hillman@m>...>
wrote:
> Yeah, not quite sure what the current, real quality of digital is,
(short of a $3,000.00 digital camera, etc.), but it looks like
the "old" print system is definitely on the way out. I used to
develop my own film and prints a few years back. I still have a 35mm
SLR and love it.
>
> But, I have another film OT question; what's the best way to
separate print-film pictures that are stuck together?
>
> Paul Hillman


Paul - I think you might try soaking the print film pictures in
distilled water - they were developed in water in the first place.
They should separate.

It is my understanding that a single 35mm black and white negative
holds the equivalent of 80 megapixels of data in "analog" form
(actually, it is digital when you get down to the molecular level).
A single 2-1/4" X 2-1/4" B&W negative holds 150 megapixels of data.
The negative is also a much better way to store data archivally -
the compact disc technology will probably be long obsolete, while
B&W negatives will still be great. I also understand that a digital
image on a compact disc will only last for about 20 years before it
needs to be removed and placed on new media. Maybe by then, a more
permanent form of storage will have been invented. A digital
picture can be transferred as a jpeg file several times before it
starts to break up - but when it does start to break up, it goes
away in spectacular fashion.

The above info comes from various articles in "Photo Techniques"
magazine. They are somewhat impartial - also do research on digital
and new wet photography films and papers.

Just another example of instant gratification over craftsmanship and
quality! A.T. Kott






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