Date   

Re: CNW 40ft PS-1 boxcar details

Ed Hawkins
 

On Thursday, September 1, 2005, at 04:02 PM, Mark Heiden wrote:

I have some questions concerning the details of some Chicago & North
Western 40ft PS-1 boxcars.  The series is 656-1655, 1000 cars built in
1954. I have only been able to find one picture, a broadside shot of
CNW 1102, on the pay-side of the NEB&W website:

http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/rolling-stock/Box-cars/PS-1';s/XM-PS-1-
CNW-1102-Whittaker.jpg

Does anyone know what kind of roofwalk and brakewheel these cars were
built with?  Also, what sort of trucks did they have?  The trucks look
like Kato ASF A-3 Ride Control trucks to me, but I'm not certain about
that.
Mark,
The first 800 cars had Youngstown doors and the last 200 cars had
5-panel Superior doors. Hand brakes were Miner, Ajax, and Universal,
however I don't know the exact car number assignments. Running boards
were either Apex or U.S. Gypsum. Photos show that most, if not all,
cars had A-3 R.C. trucks. In addition to the Whittaker photo, there's a
bunch of available photos of cars from this series, including from
Richard Burg (664/1289), Bob's Photo (1219 in color), Charles Winters
collection (1572), Joe Collias (1008/1588), Dick Kuelbs (691), and Mike
Gruber (664/838/1289 from the Tom Martorano collection). Hope this
helps.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Taylor trucks

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Sep 1, 2005, at 8:02 PM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:

Richard Townsend asked:
"I have come into possession of a pair of Taylor trucks. My
understanding is that Taylors were used exclusively (or almost so) by
the Reading. My question is this: what series of cars, if any, would
have had Taylor trucks in 1958?"
"I'm looking for a good modeling candidate, which in my case is a car
that I can model with an available kit."

Oy. From a modeling standpoint, Reading's pre-WWII boxcars are a pain
in the ass.... etc. etc.
Ben got so absorbed in the problems of modeling the Reading's box cars that he overlooked a much easier solution. One series of Reading GML USRA-design 70 ton mill gondolas had Taylor trucks, series 23500-24499 built in 1926. Those cars can be modeled with Westerfield resin kits or, if you're willing to fix some minor shortcomings, Walthers styrene models, and many of them were still in revenue service in 1958. In fact, I have a Col. Chet McCoid photo of RDG 24198 still going strong and in excellent condition in December, 1957. Of course, the Reading gons had 70 ton, not 50 ton, Taylor trucks, but since the journal boxes on most model trucks are oversize anyway, I'll bet the trucks Richard Townsend has would represent the gondola trucks quite convincingly.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: truck naming

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Sep 1, 2005, at 9:15 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

Rob Kirkham wrote:
Tony and Richard, thanks for these replies - I appreciate learning that
things aren't as simple or straightforward as they once seemed. I
take it
then the old adage about using a photo is pretty much the starting
point for
picking/modelling a truck - the specs alone just won't do?
I can't speak for Richard, but I'd say you would prefer to have
both. The photo is primary, because sideframe shapes did vary with time
as well as with manufacturer, and you can always find the closest match
possible in the limited universe of model trucks. "Closest," that is,
for a given set of design aspects, such as spring planks, bolster
snubbers, etc. The specs do help too but only to narrow down what you
are looking at in the models.
I once thought I could collect truck drawings and info from the
Cycs and have a complete listing of what every mfgr. made. Wrong. They
by no means always put all the product into a particular Cyc. And it
isn't hard to find car photos with trucks which don't exactly match
anything in a Cyc. Richard's article in RP CYC is a landmark in setting
a framework for this topic, but there are many, many details he simply
couldn't cover, as I'm sure he will be quick to say.
All completely true, and clearly and concisely stated.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: truck naming

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Rob Kirkham wrote:
Tony and Richard, thanks for these replies - I appreciate learning that
things aren't as simple or straightforward as they once seemed. I take it
then the old adage about using a photo is pretty much the starting point for
picking/modelling a truck - the specs alone just won't do?
I can't speak for Richard, but I'd say you would prefer to have both. The photo is primary, because sideframe shapes did vary with time as well as with manufacturer, and you can always find the closest match possible in the limited universe of model trucks. "Closest," that is, for a given set of design aspects, such as spring planks, bolster snubbers, etc. The specs do help too but only to narrow down what you are looking at in the models.
I once thought I could collect truck drawings and info from the Cycs and have a complete listing of what every mfgr. made. Wrong. They by no means always put all the product into a particular Cyc. And it isn't hard to find car photos with trucks which don't exactly match anything in a Cyc. Richard's article in RP CYC is a landmark in setting a framework for this topic, but there are many, many details he simply couldn't cover, as I'm sure he will be quick to say.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


truck naming

Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@...>
 

Tony and Richard, thanks for these replies - I appreciate learning that things aren't as simple or straightforward as they once seemed. I take it then the old adage about using a photo is pretty much the starting point for picking/modelling a truck - the specs alone just won't do?

Rob Kirkham,


Re: Taylor trucks

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Richard Townsend asked:
"I have come into possession of a pair of Taylor trucks. My
understanding is that Taylors were used exclusively (or almost so) by
the Reading. My question is this: what series of cars, if any, would
have had Taylor trucks in 1958?"

Page 68 of the Morning Sun Reading Color Guide shows RDG 102123 from
RDG 101000-102999, Class XMu, 1910 cars remaining in January 1959.
This car has Taylor trucks; photo taken at Shamokin, PA, October 14,
1962. Here's an earlier photo from Ted Culotta's website:
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/gallery/boxauto/rdg102751main.html


"I'm looking for a good modeling candidate, which in my case is a car
that I can model with an available kit."

Oy. From a modeling standpoint, Reading's pre-WWII boxcars are a pain
in the ass. With the exception of their USRA SS boxcars, almost all
classes are tantalizingly close to available kits, but have one or
more significant differences that make building an accurate model
difficult. At first glance, Class XMu looks like an X29 copy.
However, even though this car has flat ends, it has 8-panel sides, a
Hutchins roof, and an IH of 9 ft 3 in, 8 inches taller than the X29.
The height difference is what makes this kitbash difficult -
otherwise, you could use the ends from a Red Caboose kit, the sides
from the Westerfield USRA-design steel boxcar (from the earlier flat
kits), and a Hutchins roof cut from an Accurail SS boxcar. To get the
correct height, you'll need to splice sides and ends.

Red Caboose did offer the X29 as a Reading Class XMt boxcar, which was
a 8 ft 7 in IH car with flat ends; however, it has 10 panel sides vs
the 8 panel sides of the protoype, and I have not seen a photo of
these cars with Taylor trucks (my Reading resources are admittedly
thin). The bottom line - it depends on what compromises that you can
live with.


Ben Hom


Re: Taylor trucks

Rich Yoder
 

What scale do you model in?

Rich

----- Original Message -----
From: <richtownsend@netscape.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, September 01, 2005 8:13 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Taylor trucks


I have come into possession of a pair of Taylor trucks. My understanding is that Taylors were used exclusively (or almost so) by the Reading. My question is this: what series of cars, if any, would have had Taylor trucks in 1958? I'm looking for a good modeling candidate, which in my case is a car that I can model with an available kit.

--
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


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Black Cat decalsRe: Tank Car decals HELP

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Brian Carlson asked:
"Does Black cat have a website?"

http://www.greatdecals.com/BlackCat.htm


Ben Hom


Re: C&EI 8 panel gondola

Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
 

Tyler Turpin asked:
"does anyone know of photos or other sources of detailed info on the
ends of the 8 panel gons rebuilt in 1953 for the C AND EI these were
series 95300 to 95399. The photo online is good for the sides but not
good enough to detail the ends for the members of this group.
converting the kit to the prototype mainly means sanding off a lot of
rivets, removing the left side of the ladder frame on the right hand
side, and adding some grab irons and probably $5.00 worth of parts to
the ends and some cutting on the ends may be required.the step plate is
too high and has to go. A quick cheap kitbash that will produce a very
accurate model from a car that can be picked up for under $7.00 at
shows may be possible."

1. Do you have a URL for the "photo online"?
2. What model are you using for your starting point?


Ben Hom


c & ei 8 panel gongondola

birdbiz2003 <birdbiz2003@...>
 

does anyone know of photos or other sources of detailed info on the
ends of the 8 panel gons rebuilt in 1953 for the C AND EI these were
series 95300 to 95399. The photo online is good for the sides but not
good enough to detail the ends for the members of this group.
converting the kit to the prototype mainly means sanding off a lot of
rivets , removing the left side of the ladder frame on the right hand
side, and adding some grab irons and probably $5.00 worth of parts to
the ends and some cutting on the ends may be required.the step plate is
too high and has to go. A quick cheap kitbash that will produce a very
accurate model from a car that can be picked up for under $7.00 at
shows may be possible.

Sincerely ,

Tyler Turpin


Taylor trucks

Richard Townsend
 

I have come into possession of a pair of Taylor trucks. My understanding is that Taylors were used exclusively (or almost so) by the Reading. My question is this: what series of cars, if any, would have had Taylor trucks in 1958? I'm looking for a good modeling candidate, which in my case is a car that I can model with an available kit.

--
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


__________________________________________________________________
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As low as $9.95 a month -- Sign up today at http://isp.netscape.com/register

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New! Netscape Toolbar for Internet Explorer
Search from anywhere on the Web and block those annoying pop-ups.
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Black Cat decalsRe: Tank Car decals HELP

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

does Black cat have a website?

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

----- Original Message -----
From: "joe binish" <joebinish@earthlink.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, September 01, 2005 11:25 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tank Car decals HELP


If any one has not used Black Cat's 'cals- Please do! They are nothing
short of the best I have ever used(this from a 1/72 aircraft modeler, as
well as a resin car builder with 30+ operating on 3 layouts)
The Sinclair set is really slick on the P2K kit.
Joe Binish






Yahoo! Groups Links






Re: BCW (ex-Cape Line, ex-Red Ball) Trucks ( was Re: Digest Number 2640)

Rob & Bev Manley
 

Dean,
I've been converting my cars to Intermountain semi fine scale wheel sets when I can afford them. I agree with the hoppers, tank cars etc logic but I also put them on my better resin cars too.
We run code 70 on the Midwest Mod-U-Trak modular railroad and have experienced no problems with these wheelsets even in public or at the Naperville RPM shows. Incedentaly, our turnouts are 20 year old Lamberts. I haven't used the BCW trucks just Accurail, Red Caboose, Branchline, Athearn and P2K. I havent converted any Kadees with the Reboxx exact fit wheelsets but I intend to do so uinless someone comes out with a decent Diamond T for my PFE cars.

Rob Manley
"It's just that I love boxcars and I love to read the names on them like Missouri Pacific, Great Northrn, Rock Island Line"
On the Road----Jack Kerouac

----- Original Message -----
From: Dean Payne
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, September 01, 2005 4:38 PM
Subject: [STMFC] BCW (ex-Cape Line, ex-Red Ball) Trucks ( was Re: Digest Number 2640)


The only reason I can think of to change out the wheelsets is to go for
fine-scale tread width. The BCW trucks seem to roll very well, in my
testing using properly weighted cars. Fine tread wheelsets are most
noticable on tank cars, hoppers, and cabooses. I will start with my
tank cars and see how they run on my track.
Dean Payne

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@w...> wrote:
> Fred Freitas wrote:
> "As an added note, these trucks are not soldered like the Cape Line
of
> old. The pass trucks are secured by 4 screws, which makes painting a
> lot easier !!"
>
> Not to mention changing out wheelsets! The freight truck sideframes
> are also secured by screws. Many thanks to John Greene for keeping
> these available.
>
>
> Ben Hom





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CNW 40ft PS-1 boxcar details

Mark Heiden
 

Hello everyone,

I have some questions concerning the details of some Chicago & North
Western 40ft PS-1 boxcars. The series is 656-1655, 1000 cars built in
1954. I have only been able to find one picture, a broadside shot of
CNW 1102, on the pay-side of the NEB&W website:

http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/rolling-stock/Box-cars/PS-1';s/XM-PS-1-
CNW-1102-Whittaker.jpg

Does anyone know what kind of roofwalk and brakewheel these cars were
built with? Also, what sort of trucks did they have? The trucks look
like Kato ASF A-3 Ride Control trucks to me, but I'm not certain about
that.

Thanks,
Mark Heiden


BCW (ex-Cape Line, ex-Red Ball) Trucks ( was Re: Digest Number 2640)

Dean Payne <deanpayne@...>
 

The only reason I can think of to change out the wheelsets is to go for
fine-scale tread width. The BCW trucks seem to roll very well, in my
testing using properly weighted cars. Fine tread wheelsets are most
noticable on tank cars, hoppers, and cabooses. I will start with my
tank cars and see how they run on my track.
Dean Payne

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@w...> wrote:
Fred Freitas wrote:
"As an added note, these trucks are not soldered like the Cape Line
of
old. The pass trucks are secured by 4 screws, which makes painting a
lot easier !!"

Not to mention changing out wheelsets! The freight truck sideframes
are also secured by screws. Many thanks to John Greene for keeping
these available.


Ben Hom


Re: truck naming

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Richard Hendrickson wrote:
. . . knowing who made the side frames, bolsters, etc.
tells you nothing about the design of the truck. In the example cited
by Ron Kirkham, the trucks were Dalman Two-Level with Barber lateral
motion devices between the springs and bolsters.
Exactly. But note the converse: knowing it's a Barber-stabilized truck, for example, does NOT tell you what the sideframe outline or contour will be, as each manufacturer had their own refinements. A Barber truck from National did not have the same exact sideframe as one from ASF, for example.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: CMStP&P GS gondolas

Ted Schnepf <railsunl@...>
 

Hi Andy,

these 50 ton cars were built by the Milwaukee in the Milwaukee, Wis. shops in 1949.

ted

At 03:27 PM 8/30/2005, you wrote:

Gents,

Can you help me with information on the CMStP&P 93007-93206 steel GS gondolas with 1998 cu.ft. capacity built in 1949? Builder, manufacturing plant, etc.? Any photos of these cars?

A representative car (93038) is shown in a builder's photo on the NEB&W guide to freight cars site at:
http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/rolling-stock/gons/GS-gons/Gons-GS-Milw-1949.jpg

Thank you,
Andy Laurent
Rails Unlimited
Ted Schnepf
railsunl@foxvalley.net
847-697-5353 or 5366
126 Will Scarlet
Elgin, Ill. 60120
http://users.foxvalley.net/~railsunl/

Model Railroad Sales and Service with
a personal touch.
Books new and used. HO and O scales.
DCC supplies. O scale urethane cars.
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BCW (ex-Cape Line, ex-Red Ball) Trucks ( was Re: Digest Number 2640)

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Fred Freitas wrote:
"As an added note, these trucks are not soldered like the Cape Line of
old. The pass trucks are secured by 4 screws, which makes painting a
lot easier !!"

Not to mention changing out wheelsets! The freight truck sideframes
are also secured by screws. Many thanks to John Greene for keeping
these available.


Ben Hom


Re: truck naming

Richard Hendrickson
 

As Tony Thompson has correctly observed, all of the widely used truck designs were licensed by the patent holders to other truck manufacturers, so knowing who made the side frames, bolsters, etc. tells you nothing about the design of the truck. In the example cited by Ron Kirkham, the trucks were Dalman Two-Level with Barber lateral motion devices between the springs and bolsters.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: C&S --> CX reporting mark.

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

In reply to the identity of a reefer in the consist of a depicted CGW train, Ken Martin <kmartin@cwia.com> reports on the CB&Q List-

According to Bulletin #12 C&S Reefers 50050-50249 were built in 1923. In
1932 they were leased to BREX and reporting marks were changed from C&S
to CX.
Denny


--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento

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