Date   

Re: Attitudes of kit producers, was:Wine car ops

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Richard Hendrickson notes:

"Walter is assuming that northeastern modelers only model
northeastern railroads, which is far from true; many members of this
list who live in the northeast model western railroads (e.g. Tim
O'Connor). Conversely many who live out west model eastern lines (e.g.
Greg Martin)."

True enough. Oddly, I generally assume that those that live in a region are modeling that region. Thus, I was surprised to find such as Greg Martin and Ted Culotta. Bruce Smith...in Auburn, Alabama, models Pennsy, Jim Udaly in KC models C&O, Andy Sperandeo in Wisconsin models Cajon Pass, Jared Harper in GA models the ATSF in Kansas...and Jeff Aley models various RRs in Kansas. So...here I am in FL modeling Wyoming, Marty Megregian here is doing Utah, Tom Wilson in central FL does the P&WV and his neighbor John Wilkes does the Southern & L&N plus Dan Zugelter south of me doing C&O in WV. So...does anyone model their area? Well...there are two in FL doing FEC.

"In fact, model manufacturers have, by now, a whole lot of experience
with which railroads have strong followings among modelers and which
ones don't, and that experience factors heavily into the choices they
make of prototypes to model. Anyone in their sales departments will
tell you that, if it's painted and lettered for the Pennsy or the Santa
Fe, it will sell like gangbusters, whether it's an accurate model or
not. Other formerly large and important RRs seem to score high on the
boredom scale, for some reason; examples include New York Central,
Louisville & Nashville, and almost all of the RRs in the south and
southeast (and before devotees of those RRs write angry responses to
this observation, let me point out that those aren't my personal
judgments, just what I'm told by people in the industry about their
sales figures)."

I have to wonder if some of this developed during the 1970/80 brass steam loco market analysis. Recent plastic steam loco generation seems to have gone in a somewhat different direction. Builders seem to have decided that USRA engines would provide more of a broad based market. Frankly, I think they were wrong. Buyers not particularly drawn to a particular RR are...IMO...driven more to "asthetic" designs perhaps but I believe more so to well detailed and good running models. Hence, they'll go for anything well done. Prototype modelers, however, are more drawn to models that are accurate and accurate for their time period. Very few USRA engines were NOT modified by the late 40's early '50's time period. Hence, most USRA models aren't really well suited to the serious prototype modeler...unless they intend to bash it. That's not to say that frt car market studies are based on the brass steam loco market of the '80's/'90's, but there might be some correlation.

Mike Brock


Re: new products (was BLI vs. Walthers express reefers)

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Sep 22, 2005, at 9:30 AM, timboconnor@comcast.net wrote:

Richard, your points are quite valid, but I wonder if you are missing the
most important point -- we started this topic by talking about cars that
can be custom-made or are good limited run candidates. So the fact that
a Type 27 multicompartment car might have been rare (or a rebuild) only
makes it MORE attractive as a candidate for this treatment. An ideal
mini-kit makes maximum use of existing kit parts (like frame and tank
and dome). So the question remains, do you know of any actual examples
of multidome 8k (or 10k) Type 27 tank cars? Personally I think the
conversions with different dome sizes are just way cool and really stand
out in a crowd.

And frankly, I'd love to see some 3 and 4 compartment wine tanks too! :-)
I don't disagree with any of this, Tim, and will send you off-list some images that you may find interesting.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: cars that sell; plus tank car bashing, etc.

Tim O'Connor
 

Richard wrote

...as lousy as it is, the Athearn tank car frame may also be suitable
for bashing into something more closely resembling the GATC pre-war
frame. Has anyone done one of these that met their satisfaction?
I did an article for RMJ several years ago (August, 1996?) on
kitbashing an Athearn single dome tank car model

Two models actually. One 12,500 gal (SP) and one 10,000 gal (GATX).
Pages 14-21.

SP also had 50 (fifty) 8,000 gal GATC cars, class O-50-14. Probably
more than anyone else, now that I think of it! ;-)


Re: cars that sell; plus tank car bashing, etc.

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Sep 22, 2005, at 11:42 AM, Gatwood, Elden wrote:

...as lousy as it is, the Athearn tank car frame may also be suitable
for bashing into something more closely resembling the GATC pre-war
frame. Has anyone done one of these that met their satisfaction?
I did an article for RMJ several years ago (August, 1996?) on kitbashing an Athearn single dome tank car model (which scales out to about 12,500 gals.) by shortening both tank and underframe to the dimensions of a 10K gal. GATC Type 30, along with increasing the dome height and adding considerable detail. I thought the model turned out pretty well. Look up the article and see for yourself.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Attitudes of kit producers, was:Wine car ops

Tim O'Connor
 

Richard Hendrickson wrote

Other formerly large and important RRs seem to score high on the
boredom scale, for some reason; examples include New York Central,
Louisville & Nashville, and almost all of the RRs in the south and
southeast (and before devotees of those RRs write angry responses to
this observation, let me point out that those aren't my personal
judgments, just what I'm told by people in the industry about their
sales figures).
And to underscore that point, the other day I was watching a Shoreham
Shops L&N Pullman, nicely painted, on Ebay -- and it sold for less than
$90!! A similar SP or PRR or MILW car would have sold for 2x as much.
And a Lambert Reading box car, also nicely painted, went for $45... So
roadnames really do make a difference.


Re: Wine car ops

Mr Charles burns
 

Hello Tim ,All
There was some discussion of winecars on this list a
while back, and one post {gatx417?}had a Bob Morris
photo of Fresno with many wine cars in view. So for
the central valley in the 50s-60s at least,wine cars
were not an oddity. This is enough of an excuse for me
to build a 6 dome wine car for my N scale 64'
Coastline layout.
Charlie Burns

--- Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@sunlink.net> wrote:

Richard Hendrickson wrote:


Wine tank cars would certainly not have been seen
on branch lines in
places like Kansas or Georgia. But there is
abundant photographic
evidence of them in the trains of the major
transcontinental carriers
that served California such as the Santa Fe, Union
Pacific/C&NW, and
Southern Pacific/Rock Island/T&NO/SSW, sometimes
several of them at one
time, en route to widely scattered destinations.
I wonder sometimes whether the "abundant
photographic evidence" is more
related to the oddity of a car than to quantity.

Tim Gilbert



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Re: Attitudes of kit producers

Tim O'Connor
 

William

The "median center" for the U.S. population has moved steadily
westwards from Indiana to Illinois in my lifetime. So your theory
of the population being concentrated to the northeast is wrong.

INCOME however, is not so evenly distributed, and the center of
gravity of that is probably a couple hundred miles east of the
population median point, and somewhat north as well. But even
that kind of thinking only takes you so far. Irv Athearn chose
mostly western prototypes, I think, because that's what he saw
every day...

Tim O.

1. Except for California and Texas the states with the highest
population (for example, look at any nighttime satelite photo of the
continental US and note where the largest areas of light concentration
are), and therefore potential modelers (market for models) is in the
northeast; and


Re: Attitudes of kit producers, was:Wine car ops

cvsne <mjmcguirk@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson
<rhendrickson@o...>
wrote:
<snip a whole bunch of stuff> If we can get injection-molded
styrene
"conversation pieces" like Pfaudler milk reefers,
I'm surprised no one has mentioned this - especially given
some list members obsession with correct terminology - but
there is no such thing as a Pfaulder milk "reefer" -- or even
refrigerator car. They are, in fact, tank cars (says so on the side).

Hey they have two tanks, does that mean they're the bovine
equivalent of a two dome tank car???????!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Seriously, there were a bunch of reasons I decided to do a milk
car while I was at InterMountain -- primarily because the
18-20,000 folks who showed up at the Springfield show
demonstrated an overwhelming interest in northeastern
railroads -- especially New England railroads, not those western
lines like the NYC, PRR, or B&O . . . and just think of the reaction
of the eastern folks when we mentioned a Santa Fe stock car . . .
you'd think I was confiscating lolly pops . . .

From what I understand both the milk car and stock car are
selling well, which creates money to pay for the company's next
tooling project which may be a car appropriate for those Indian
country lines . . . or another car closer to the hearts of those back
east. Fortunately I don't have to pick them anymore -- just buy
them -- or not . . ..

Marty McGuirk


Re: Wine Cars

Fred in Vt. <pennsy@...>
 

Guyz,

The NH had the same problems with leaking valves on car loads of alcohol shipped from Canada to Old Mister Boston distilling. The B&A didn't have that problem with S S Pierce, the wine car was inside! Points of interest.

Fred Freitas

----- Original Message -----
From: ljack70117@adelphia.net
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, September 22, 2005 8:21 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Wine Cars



On Sep 22, 2005, at 7:31 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

> Jack Burgess wrote:
>
>> Drilling a hole in the bottom of a tank car without a ready source of
>> electricity and a very good drill and bit does sound a little
>> suspicious....
>>
>
> Yes, especially with the insulating jacket over a 7/16" solid
> steel shell.
>
> Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
> 2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
> (510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail,
> thompson@signaturepress.com
> Publishers of books on railroad history

I could be done if you had the right tools but I doubt that they
would be available in the yard. But the one in Emporia Ks, I saw it.
The Eastbound lead job had cut it out as a BO and the carmen were
working on it to stop the leak. Se we got some wine from it and they
finaly got it stopped. Fun night though.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net
Shin: A device for finding furniture in the dark.



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Re: Nitpickin' decals

Tim O'Connor
 

The small UP shop stencils can be found here:
http://www.microscale.com/decals/HO_scale/87489.jpg
http://www.microscale.com/decals/HO_scale/87494.jpg

The NYC System triangles in -black- can be found here
http://www.microscale.com/decals/HO_scale/87702.jpg
and also on some CDS sets.

The NYC System triangles in -white- can be found in
Mark Vaughan's P&E, NYC stock car, and IHB box car sets,
and also in several CDS NYC/P&LE dry transfer sets. The
P&E box car set has six triangles, enough for 3 cars.

At 02:52 PM 9/22/2005, you wrote:
I would suggest the triangular NYC paint symbols and some generic NYC
"class" designations for dealing with cars for which specific decals
aren't available. UP paint symbols are another to add, also UP repack
stencils in the shield.

Dave Soderblom
Baltimore MD


Northeastern Models

Bob Webber <no17@...>
 

This likely is less an issue with geography than one of perception, BUT, if one takes a look at election time, when it is fairly obvious which states have the most electoral votes and therefor the population, you just might discover that a state not in California, not in the northeast and not in Texas and having the second largest city has a fairly large population. And you might discover that certain other states in that same region, commonly known as the "midwest" also have large populations. You might also discover that Florida has a fairly good population. Of course, to some, Pennsylvania is in the midwest, and so is Ohio. To others, Colorado is. Makes a large region. But I digress.

The reason that the Northeast has the interest in models is that the railroads of the time period were overwhelmingly the largest in the Northeast. As the by now well known box car index and ratio shows, just PRR X-29's and NYC box cars by themselves made up a majority of the fleet. The operations were a lot more interesting. The steel industry was a much more lively and dispersed concern. The auto industry was much more concentrated. And, perhaps moire importantly, at that time, there were more than 4 major railroads.
The other major contributing factor is the availability of photos due to the wealth of photographers. And the closeness of photographers to subjects. You didn't have to travel a couple of hundred miles to reach a different railroad. Variety was far moire available than if you lived, say, in Sacramento. Even having the traction companies and short lines, they certainly weren't photographed to the degree you'd find in, say Albany. So, just like the RGS sees far more modelers than the C&S in narrow gauge, the Northeast sees more models due to the availability of images.

As far as parochialism, it typically goes both ways. I know a lot of New Yorkers who have the famous image of New York with Indian country to the west. I also know a lot of westerners who say that there is nothing worth seeing or modeling east of I-25 (I know, I used to be one of them). Of course, not to get to a wholly off topic bent again - but I know a lot of westerners who would refuse to go to Springfield due to the weather. Parochialism rears its head in many forms. If more westerners went where the manufacturers were, they might just find them willing to make more models of western themed equipment. I know of two manufactures right now who are looking for a "western" resin freight car project. They are in the East. Now, on the one hand, they could certainly go west, and in one case they will. In the other, it isn't going to happen due to time and/or physical restraints.


At 07:20 PM 9/22/2005, STMFC@yahoogroups.com wrote:
Richard, and everyone else,

I wonder if the reason we get only northeastern prototype cars like
the Pfaudler milk reefers and not cars that were seen throughout the
country like wine tank cars, and others, is because:

1. Except for California and Texas the states with the highest
population (for example, look at any nighttime satelite photo of the
continental US and note where the largest areas of light concentration
are), and therefore potential modelers (market for models) is in the
northeast; and

2. List population excepted, many northeasterners are very parochial
in their attitudes and really don't care much about anything that
might break through their "if it is from west of the Mississippi and
north of the Ohio is doesn't matter" attitute.

Walter M. Clark
Time stopped in November 1941
Riverside, California
Bob Webber


Re: new products (was BLI vs. Walthers express reefers)

Fred in Vt. <pennsy@...>
 

Rich,

Bruce is taking his "lightning medication" on MD's orders. Now, how 'bout we cut the end off a shallow end tank car, shape it to fit over a Bowser 0-6-0 mechanism, then add the cab from same. Done- one fireless cooker, short build form. The deliver on a HD flat.

Fred Freitas

----- Original Message -----
From: "Richard Hendrickson" <rhendrickson@opendoor.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, September 22, 2005 12:14 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] RE: new products (was BLI vs. Walthers express reefers)


On Sep 22, 2005, at 6:40 AM, Bruce Smith wrote:


On Sep 22, 2005, at 7:58 AM, Marcelo Lordeiro wrote:

Thanks Tim,
Let's think on some cars and choose one(tank car ?).
Which one?
Regards
Marcelo Lordeiro
Marcelo,

Think about the following:

AC&F type 11 - This was offered by Sunset in brass as the PRR TM8,
then in multiple bogus schemes. The Sunset model is "coarse" by
today's standards. This was an extremely common tank car for its
time, but may be unlikely to get produced in styrene because it is a
little too "old". WWII era and after modelers won't need very many
to add to their fleets, but they will need one or two. Folks
modeling 1911 to the Great Depression will need lots more.
An excellent idea! Thousands of these cars were built, most of them 8K
and 10K gal. ARA IIs, and both 8k and 10K tanks were mounted on the
same underframes. A number of petroleum shippers (e.g., Associated,
Mid-Continent D-X) owned them in large numbers. Also, they lasted
longer than you think, Bruce. I have many photos of them in still in
revenue service in the '50s and '60s. Several RRs also bought them for
fuel and water service (though the Pennsy's were acquired second-hand).

UTLX type X - The type X is the MDC old time tank car, but the MDC
car needs a completely new frame. Once could simply offer the frame
and detail parts, and let the modeler buy the MDC model for the
tank! This is another "old time" tank car that saw service past the
middle of the 20th century.
Another very good idea, especially since the MDC tank wouldn't be bad
if mounted on a correct underframe. Exclusively UTL (except for a few
that were in RR M-W service after having been written off and
repaired), so no eye-catching P/L schemes, but like the AC&F Type 11s
many of them remained in service into the '60s � I have a ca. 1965
photo of one coupled to a high-cube box car.

UTLX type V - The type V is the "Van Dyke" frameless tank car. These
are offered by Precision Scale in an injection molded kit, but the
model is really of a narrow gauge car that had been converted from a
standard gauge car. You can convert these kits BACK to their std
gauge appearance, but there might be room here for a true std gauge
car kit. Again, this is an "old time" car that saw service well past
the midpoint of the 20th century.
I'd regard the Type V as a less attractive prototype, both because the
Precision Scale kit is quite good (and does come in a standard gauge
version) and because these cars were all retired before mid-'53 owing
to the difficulty of applying AB air brakes to cars without
underframes.

Multi-dome tanks for the IM and P2K AC&F frames (type 27 and 21
respectively). Again, it seems unlikely that we will see a variety
of multidome tanks, yet we now have two relatively accurate frames
that could accept after-market resin tanks.
The problem here is that almost all purpose-built multi-compartment
tank cars were of 6K gals. nominal capacity; larger ones were extremely
rare except where an 8K or 10K single compartment tank had been
converted to two or three compartments (and these are easy to identify
because their original center domes were always larger than the domes
for the end compartments). So there were only a few odd-ball
prototypes for multiple-compartment models that could use the IM or P2K
underframes. However, how about 8K and 10K insulated ICC-103/-104
tanks for the IM underframe? Many of these cars were built both for
SHPX and private owners.

Finally, a completely off the wall suggestion...

Fireless Cooker (aka "Thermos Bottle")
I'll say it's off the wall. Bruce, you gotta go back to beer and lay
off that Alabama white lightning.

Richard Hendrickson





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Re: Wine car ops

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Sep 21, 2005, at 12:31 PM, Andreas Kühnpast wrote:

....Would wine have been sent in barrels in reefers or would it have
been transported in tank cars?
Both, depending on what the consignee wanted. Relatively small lots of
several different wines would have gone in barrels in refrigerator cars
(which weren't iced, or at least weren't iced much, since the objective
was to maintain a constant "cellar temperature" around ±60° F). Even
the separate compartments in a six compartment wine tank car held more
than 1,000 gals. each, and that's a LOT of wine. Relatively few
consignees were in a position to have bulk wine shipped in such large
quantities.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Attitudes of kit producers, was:Wine car ops

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Sep 22, 2005, at 12:08 PM, Walter M. Clark wrote:

I wonder if the reason we get only northeastern prototype cars like
the Pfaudler milk reefers and not cars that were seen throughout the
country like wine tank cars, and others, is because:

1. Except for California and Texas the states with the highest
population (for example, look at any nighttime satelite photo of the
continental US and note where the largest areas of light concentration
are), and therefore potential modelers (market for models) is in the
northeast; and

2. List population excepted, many northeasterners are very parochial
in their attitudes and really don't care much about anything that
might break through their "if it is from west of the Mississippi and
north of the Ohio is doesn't matter" attitute.
Such broad-brush generalizations almost always miss the mark, as they
do here. Walter is assuming that northeastern modelers only model
northeastern railroads, which is far from true; many members of this
list who live in the northeast model western railroads (e.g. Tim
O'Connor). Conversely many who live out west model eastern lines (e.g.
Greg Martin). So the issue isn't where modelers live but, regardless
of where they live, which railroads make their hearts beat fonder.

In fact, model manufacturers have, by now, a whole lot of experience
with which railroads have strong followings among modelers and which
ones don't, and that experience factors heavily into the choices they
make of prototypes to model. Anyone in their sales departments will
tell you that, if it's painted and lettered for the Pennsy or the Santa
Fe, it will sell like gangbusters, whether it's an accurate model or
not. Other formerly large and important RRs seem to score high on the
boredom scale, for some reason; examples include New York Central,
Louisville & Nashville, and almost all of the RRs in the south and
southeast (and before devotees of those RRs write angry responses to
this observation, let me point out that those aren't my personal
judgments, just what I'm told by people in the industry about their
sales figures).

As for parochialism, there may be plenty of that in the northeast but
it's also rampant in the south, midwest, southwest, northwest, far
west, etc. There are a lot of modelers out there in all parts of North
America who will tell you that, for example, because they model the
Santa Fe or the Atlantic Coast Line, they're not the least bit
interested in freight cars owned by the Pennsy, B&O, or IC, to say
nothing of the Canadian RRs or any of the smaller RRs like the Rutland,
Birmingham Southern, or SP&S. Never mind that there's ample
documentation showing that cars from all of the above ran in
interchange on the Santa Fe and the ACL during the steam era.

Those of us who subscribe to lists like this one tend to forget that a
majority of those who buy model freight cars have never quite gotten
over their early experience with tinplate toy trains and tend to be
influenced less by prototypical accuracy than by a fondness for odd
road names (Ann Arbor; Quanah, Acme & Pacific; Bangor & Aroostook),
garish P/L schemes, and a host of other motivations we know not of and,
in some cases, can't even imagine. That's slowly changing as prototype
modeling moves more into the hobby's mainstream, but it's still a fact
that manufacturers ignore at their peril.

Given the unpredictable vagaries of the model railroad market place,
it's astonishing how much good stuff (and how little junk) we're
getting these days, with more on the way. Even "conversation pieces"
like Pfaudler milk cars and, quite possibly, somewhere down the road,
six compartment wine tank cars.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Wine Cars

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Sep 22, 2005, at 4:27 PM, Jack Burgess wrote:

Drilling a hole in the bottom of a tank car without a ready source of
electricity and a very good drill and bit does sound a little suspicious....
Especially when it was a heavily insulated car with a steel jacket and 2"-3" of insulation on the outside of the tank plus a thick steel bottom sheet with a glass lining inside. Aside from which the wine that was shipped in bulk wasn't very alcoholic (alcohol content increases with barrel aging) and didn't taste very good, so the results wouldn't have been, to say the least, disappointing. I agree with Tony that this and similar tales can be relegated to the waste bin entitled "urban myths."

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Wine Cars

ljack70117@...
 

On Sep 22, 2005, at 7:31 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

Jack Burgess wrote:

Drilling a hole in the bottom of a tank car without a ready source of
electricity and a very good drill and bit does sound a little
suspicious....
Yes, especially with the insulating jacket over a 7/16" solid
steel shell.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history
I could be done if you had the right tools but I doubt that they would be available in the yard. But the one in Emporia Ks, I saw it. The Eastbound lead job had cut it out as a BO and the carmen were working on it to stop the leak. Se we got some wine from it and they finaly got it stopped. Fun night though.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net
Shin: A device for finding furniture in the dark.


Re: Attitudes of kit producers, was:Wine car ops

al_brown03
 

Remember also that in the time frame of this list, industrial
activity was much more concentrated in the Northeast than it is any
more. John Nehrich has commented eloquently on this, from the
opposite perspective: wishing to model the Northeast with its
industrial base still vigorous.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "wmcclark1980" <walterclark@e...>
wrote:
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "wmcclark1980" <walterclark@e...>
wrote:
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson
<rhendrickson@o...>
wrote:
<snip a whole bunch of stuff> If we can get injection-molded
styrene
"conversation pieces" like Pfaudler milk reefers, which are
entirely
useless to modelers of southern, southwestern, and western
RRs, why
> not six compartment wine tank cars?

Richard Hendrickson
Richard, and everyone else,

I wonder if the reason we get only northeastern prototype cars
like
the Pfaudler milk reefers and not cars that were seen throughout
the
country like wine tank cars, and others, is because:

1. Except for California and Texas the states with the highest
population (for example, look at any nighttime satelite photo of
the
continental US and note where the largest areas of light
concentration
are), and therefore potential modelers (market for models) is in
the
northeast; and

2. List population excepted, many northeasterners are very
parochial
in their attitudes and really don't care much about anything that
might break through their "if it is from west of the Mississippi
and
north of the Ohio is doesn't matter" attitute.

Walter M. Clark
Time stopped in November 1941
Riverside, California
Point 2 should say in part "if it is from west of the Mississippi
and
SOUTH of the Ohio IT doesn't matter"... This was one of those
times
when I read what I wanted to say when I proofed the message. Oh,
well, another PEBKAC (problem exists between keyboard a chair).

Walt


Re: Attitudes of kit producers, was:Wine car ops

Walter M. Clark
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "wmcclark1980" <walterclark@e...> wrote:
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "wmcclark1980" <walterclark@e...> wrote:
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@o...>
wrote:
<snip a whole bunch of stuff> If we can get injection-molded styrene
"conversation pieces" like Pfaudler milk reefers, which are
entirely
useless to modelers of southern, southwestern, and western RRs, why
> not six compartment wine tank cars?

Richard Hendrickson
Richard, and everyone else,

I wonder if the reason we get only northeastern prototype cars like
the Pfaudler milk reefers and not cars that were seen throughout the
country like wine tank cars, and others, is because:

1. Except for California and Texas the states with the highest
population (for example, look at any nighttime satelite photo of the
continental US and note where the largest areas of light concentration
are), and therefore potential modelers (market for models) is in the
northeast; and

2. List population excepted, many northeasterners are very parochial
in their attitudes and really don't care much about anything that
might break through their "if it is from west of the Mississippi and
north of the Ohio is doesn't matter" attitute.

Walter M. Clark
Time stopped in November 1941
Riverside, California
Point 2 should say in part "if it is from west of the Mississippi and
SOUTH of the Ohio IT doesn't matter"... This was one of those times
when I read what I wanted to say when I proofed the message. Oh,
well, another PEBKAC (problem exists between keyboard a chair).

Walt
This is getting ridiculous. PEBKAC means "problem exists between
keyboard AND chair." I should stop posting and only read.

Walt


Re: new products

Walter M. Clark
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Patrick Wider" <pwider@s...> wrote:
Hey, I don't care one hoot about new freight car models of very
limited interest since I'll
certainly not live long enough to build, detail, correct, paint, and
decal the hundreds of
plastic and resin kits I already have in addition to researching the
prototype, publishing RP
CYC, watching my train videos, finishing my basement, wiring the
overhead lighting
system, building the benchwork, laying and detailing the track,
painting the backdrop,
wiring the signal system, building the structures, perfecting the
scenery, painting and
decaling the brass locos, freight cars, and passenger cars, cleaning
my airbrush, and
running freight and passenger trains in a prototypical fashion on
the darn thing. Oh, I
also what to read my hundreds of books on military history and build
my military models.
Did I leave anything out? Oh yeah, sleeping and eating. Despite
taking vitamins, losing a
little weight, eating better, and getting regular checkups, I seem
to be falling badly behind
here! Does heaven (hell?) allow model railroading???

How's that for being the skunk at the tea party????

Pat Wider
Pat,

Sounds to me like you're bored. Maybe you should take up knitting or
some other hobby you can do with your hands.

I was born in August 1949. As you can see from my comment in my
signature block below my railroad (totally hypothetical, btw) is set
slightly less than eight years before I was born, so I'll never get
started on any of that stuff you mentioned, much less have the time to
finish.

Walter M. Clark
Time stopped in November 1941
Riverside, California


Re: Attitudes of kit producers, was:Wine car ops

Walter M. Clark
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "wmcclark1980" <walterclark@e...> wrote:
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@o...>
wrote:
<snip a whole bunch of stuff> If we can get injection-molded styrene
"conversation pieces" like Pfaudler milk reefers, which are entirely
useless to modelers of southern, southwestern, and western RRs, why
> not six compartment wine tank cars?

Richard Hendrickson
Richard, and everyone else,

I wonder if the reason we get only northeastern prototype cars like
the Pfaudler milk reefers and not cars that were seen throughout the
country like wine tank cars, and others, is because:

1. Except for California and Texas the states with the highest
population (for example, look at any nighttime satelite photo of the
continental US and note where the largest areas of light concentration
are), and therefore potential modelers (market for models) is in the
northeast; and

2. List population excepted, many northeasterners are very parochial
in their attitudes and really don't care much about anything that
might break through their "if it is from west of the Mississippi and
north of the Ohio is doesn't matter" attitute.

Walter M. Clark
Time stopped in November 1941
Riverside, California
Point 2 should say in part "if it is from west of the Mississippi and
SOUTH of the Ohio IT doesn't matter"... This was one of those times
when I read what I wanted to say when I proofed the message. Oh,
well, another PEBKAC (problem exists between keyboard a chair).

Walt

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