Date   

Re: trucks B.C. Models.

Bob Webber <no17@...>
 

It's unfortunate that the photos are so poorly done as to make any judgement of the efficacy of the kits moot. a case where a web page almost hurts more than helps.

At 01:54 PM 11/28/2005, you wrote:
Here is B.C. Models!
http://home.sprynet.com/~bcmodels/

- Steve Busch
Duncan, SC
Bob Webber


Re: trucks

S. Busch <SCSBusch@...>
 

Here is B.C. Models!

http://home.sprynet.com/~bcmodels/

- Steve Busch
Duncan, SC

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

----- Original Message -----
From: "Rob Adams" <steamera@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Monday, November 28, 2005 1:56 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] trucks


Four or five years ago, I corresponded with the proprietor of a business
that produced and sold many products geared toward the Circa 1900
modeler. In his line were a number of early truck designs. It seems to
me that they were cast metal with separate sideframe and bolster
components. There were also some freight car and MofW models. I know
that there were some short wheelbase arch bar trucks because I was
looking at modifying them for a caboose project that needed some 5' w.b.
trucks with a straight bottom member. It seems like the outfit was
called B.C. Models (in Florida?) or something like that. They used to
have a web site, but a quick search last evening didn't turn it up.
Are any other list members familiar with this company and their product
line? I hope they haven't gone by the wayside.

Kind regards, Rob Adams

eabracher@... wrote:

Anyone know of a maker of 5 foot WB arch bar trucks in HO scale?
needed
for a Yosemite Valley cattle car kit.

eric


Re: trucks

Rob Adams
 

Four or five years ago, I corresponded with the proprietor of a business that produced and sold many products geared toward the Circa 1900 modeler. In his line were a number of early truck designs. It seems to me that they were cast metal with separate sideframe and bolster components. There were also some freight car and MofW models. I know that there were some short wheelbase arch bar trucks because I was looking at modifying them for a caboose project that needed some 5' w.b. trucks with a straight bottom member. It seems like the outfit was called B.C. Models (in Florida?) or something like that. They used to have a web site, but a quick search last evening didn't turn it up. Are any other list members familiar with this company and their product line? I hope they haven't gone by the wayside.

Kind regards, Rob Adams

eabracher@... wrote:

Anyone know of a maker of 5 foot WB arch bar trucks in HO scale? needed
for a Yosemite Valley cattle car kit.

eric
--
Rob Adams
Wellman, IA
steamera@...
Modeling Keokuk, IA operations and the CB&Q's K&W branch, circa 1938
http://www.KeokukandWesternRR.com


Re: trucks

mcindoefalls
 

--- In STMFC@..., eabracher@a... wrote:

Anyone know of a maker of 5 foot WB arch bar trucks in HO scale?
I have some nicely detailed rigid frame 5-ft wb archbars that I
believe came off an old AHM car. Something similar is available from
IHC. They're well detailed and cheap!

Walt Lankenau


Re: trucks

eabracher@...
 

thanks Walt,

eric


Re: trucks

eabracher@...
 

thanks Dick but it is jack Burgess who is looking for 5' WB
trucks.

eric


Re: Forreston IL - 12/1950 thru 5/1951 IC Deliveries to the MILW

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Foreseen IL was on IC's original "Land Grant" line between Cairo and Galena. By 1950, the line between Centralia and Freeport (12.5 miles north of Foreseen) had been reduced to secondary status. At Foreseen, this IC line crossed the MILW's Iowa Main line 107 miles west of Chicago.


Between December 1st, 1950 and May 31st, 1951, the IC delivered 3,615 freight cars to the MILW at Forrester. The 3,615 cars translates to about 20 cars per day; hence, Forrester should not be considered a major interchange point between the IC and MILW. The IC Line appears to have been a bypass around the congestion in Chicago for lower grade commodities as per the following:

Commodity Total % Total Predominant Type of Car
Products of Agriculture 90 2.5% Box (63); Reefer (27)
Products of Animals 27 0.7% Box (16); Stock (11)
Products of Mining
Coal 2,406 66.6% Hopper (2,088); Gon (282)
Bauxite 90 2.5% Box (90)
Sand & Gravel 76 2.1% Hopper (53); Gon (21);
Salt 99 2.7% Box (99)
Other Mining 44 1.2%
Total Mining 2,715 75.1%
Forest Products Lumber 119 3.3% Lumber (119)
Other Forest 35 1.0% Gon (30)
Total Forest Products 154 4.3%
Manufacturing & Misc. Petroleum Prod. 189 5.2% Tank (187); Box (2)
Cement 119 3.3% Box (111); Cov. Hop (8)
Other Manf. & Misc. 237 6.6%
Total Manf. & Misc. 544 15.0%
Merchandise 1 0.0% Box (1)
Empty Cars 92 2.5% Tank (71)
Total Cars 3,615 100.0%

After cross referencing the Excel spreadsheet of the disk which included the Forrester data as transcribed by Ted Richardson with the April 1949 and April 1955 ORER's, it should be noted that there may have been errors in transcribing car owners & car numbers: - either by the Forrester Agent or Ted. With this caveat in mind, the 3,615 cars can be broken down into the following types:

Car Type Total % Total
Flat Cars - All 17 0.5%
Gons - Solid Bottom, Drop Ends 64 1.8%
Gons - Solid Bottom, Fixed Ends 133 3.7%
Gons - Center Drop Doors 16 0.4%
Gons - Side Drop Doors 128 3.5%
Total Gondolas 343 9.5%
Hoppers - Ballast 9 0.2%
Hoppers - Twin 2,003 55.4%
Hoppers - Trips or Quads 127 3.5%
Total Open-Top Hoppers 2,139 59.2%
Covered Hoppers 37 1.0%
Hop & Gons - Unknown 25 0.7%
Reefers - Meat 3 0.1%
Reefers - Produce 44 1.2%
Total Reefers 47 1.3%
Stock Cars - All 11 0.3%
Tank Cars - All 273 7.6%
Boxcars - Automobile 6 0.3%
Boxcars - Ventilated 3 0.1%
Boxcars - General Service 713 19.7%
Total Boxcars 722 20.0%

The correlation between the owners of foreign boxcars of those interchanged at Forrester with the 12/31/1950 boxcar roster was in line with other studies which I have made from sundry wheel reports, switch lists, etc. - not perfect, but within the ballpark except, maybe, for the Southwest Region, as per the following (at least, there is no problems with sampling as this data reflects 100% of the boxcars delivered by the IC to the MILW):

Region Total % 12/31/1950 % Variance/
Of Owners Reported % Tot. Roster Variance Tot Rptd.
Total 722 100.0% 100.0%
IC 40 5.5% 2.9%
Canadian 17 2.4%
Short Lines 3 0.4%
Unknown 12 0.7%
Total Foreign 650 90.0% 97.1%

Total Foreign 650 100.0% 100.0% - -
New England 15 2.3% 2.4% (0) -2.4%
Great Lakes 110 16.9% 19.3% (16) -12.5%
Central East 89 13.7% 16.7% (19) -17.9%
Pocahontas 33 5.1% 4.3% 5 18.2%
Southern (*) 92 14.2% 11.8% 16 20.4%
Northwest 109 16.8% 16.6% 1 0.8%
Central West 119 18.3% 19.7% (9) -7.3%
Southwest 81 12.5% 8.8% 24 41.7%

(*) - The Southern Region's Totals exclude the IC.

I have no explanation as to why there were so many cars owned by RR's in the Southwest Region which were delivered by the IC to the MILW other than it was the luck of the draw.

That more boxcars owned by the Pocahontas and Southern Region Roads than would be expected if only the Percent of 12/31/1950 Roster of boxcars owned are examined may be a reflection that the IC was somewhat the conduit between those roads and the MILW.

For hoppers & gons, however, there was hardly any correlation - since the ICC did not separate gons from hoppers until 1955, hoppers & gons must be combined to do a similar type ownership analysis as can be done for boxcars. The ownership breakdown of hoppers & gons follows:

Region Total % 12/31/1950 % Variance/
Of Owners Reported % Tot. Roster Variance Tot Rptd.
Total 2,544 100.0% 100.0%
IC - Home 1,750 68.8% 3.2%
Short Lines 17 0.7%
Private Owned 6 0.2% 0.9%
Unknown 17 0.7%
Total Foreign 755 29.7% 95.9%

Total Foreign 755 100.0% 100.0% - -
New England 6 0.8% 0.7% 1 16.3%
Great Lakes 236 31.3% 18.7% 95 77.6%
Central East 128 17.0% 30.8% (105) -53.3%
Pocahontas 16 2.1% 14.8% (96) -99.6%
Southern (*) 231 30.6% 12.0% 140 179.4%
Northwest 59 7.8% 9.0% (9) -15.7%
Central West 52 6.9% 9.3% (18) -30.3%
Southwest 26 3.4% 4.5% (8) -27.1%

That 68.8% of all Hoppers & Gons were IC-owned was a reflection of mines served by the IC in Southern Illinois. The MILW could reload only a tiny fraction of IC's Hoppers & Gons, and return them to the IC. The bulk of IC's hoppers & gons were probably returned empty to the IC - probably because the Foreseen data did not include any MILW deliveries to the IC.

There were 92 NYC Hoppers & Gons Reported in the Great Lakes Region's 236 vs. only 16 PRR Hoppers & Gons in the Central East's Region's 128. The NYC had a presence in Southern Illinois while the PRR did not. There were no MONON (Central East Region) hoppers cited indicating either there was no Southern Indiana coal being delivered to the MILW at Forrester, or the MONON routed its hoppers through Chicago, and, thus, getting a fuller share of the revenue.

In the Southern Region (ex IC), 115 of the hoppers & gons were owned by the L&N created a 73 car positive variance. This 73 car variance largely offset the 96 negative variance in the Pocahontas Region. After all, coal mined in eastern Kentucky was closer to Forrester than coal mined in southern West Virginia where the Pocahontas Roads held sway.

The 273 Tank Cars may have been the third most populous of the car types delivered by the IC, but an analysis similar to the ones above for boxcars and hoppers & gons would not yield much because tank cars were either leased to or owned by shippers/consignees. 15 of the 273 were owned by shippers/consignees; 198 by private car lines like UTLX, GATX, SHPX, NAHX etc.; 46 by the US Army; and 14 unknown.

Of the 2,406 carloads of coal interchanged, the variety of car types was wide:

Type of Car Carloads % Total
Gon - Solid Bottom, Drop Ends 46 1.9%
Gon - Solid Bottom, Fixed Ends 111 4.7%
Gon - Center Drop Doors 15 0.6%
Gon - Side Drop Doors 110 4.6%
Hopper - Ballast 9 0.4%
Hopper - Twin 1,954 81.2%
Hopper - Trip or Quad 125 5.2%
Unknown or Unidentified 36 1.5%
Total 2,406 100.0%

Before concluding this analysis, I would like to thank John Swanson for rescuing the Forrester interchange data and Ted Richardson for transcribing it onto a spreadsheet. Meanwhile, challenges, questions and comments to this analysis are welcome, and I will attempt to answer as best that I can.

Tim Gilbert


Re: Freight car photos . . . Sticky situation . . .

h8fan <jabutler@...>
 

SGL,
I worked in a couple of photo labs in my younger years. The last
step of print processing was just a water rinse. I have washed
prints in the kitchen sink a time or two to get get pop or other
spilled substance off and the prints are fine. They look discolored
when wet but return to normal once they air dry.
Try soaking your stuck photo in warm water. I think you can save
them.
Jim Butler

--- In STMFC@..., "Schuyler Larrabee"
<schuyler.larrabee@v...> wrote:

So, I'm cleaning up the work area here, and find that I have some
4x6 prints that are stuck
together, laminated, more or less . . .

[I don't wanna talk about how this came to pass . . . .]

So, these being prints made in the last 10-12 years, and probably
on some sort of plastic paper, are
these safe to just put in a tray of water, and let them unstick
themselves? It appears there's a
snowball's chance that I can pry them apart, so SOMETHING has to be
done, but is that safe?

SGL


Re: trucks

Rhbale@...
 

Eric:

I have a pair of Central Valley 5' WB arch bar trucks still in their original
package which includes George Hooks infamous dress-snap bolster. They are
yours for the asking.

Dick Bale


rapid prototyping

Manfred Lorenz
 

In addition to the stereo lithographic methode here is the same in
metal. Perhaps just what Märklin (and Kadee, Sergent) needs:

http://www.conceptlaser.de/

Manfred


Re: trucks

earlyrail
 

Look for the old Centgtral Valley archbars. These are the only 5 footers that I know of.

Howard R Garner
modeling 1905 in Minn and Iowa

Date: Sun, 27 Nov 2005 21:30:19 EST
From: eabracher@...
Subject: trucks

Anyone know of a maker of 5 foot WB arch bar trucks in HO scale? needed for a Yosemite Valley cattle car kit.

eric


Re: trucks

Marcelo Lordeiro <mrcustom@...>
 

If you can find some of the old Central Valley arch bar trucks, they are 5'
WB and sprung.
Will check if I have any and will contact you off list.
Marcelo Lordeiro

----- Original Message -----
From: <eabracher@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Monday, November 28, 2005 12:30 AM
Subject: [STMFC] trucks


Anyone know of a maker of 5 foot WB arch bar trucks in HO scale?
needed
for a Yosemite Valley cattle car kit.

eric








Yahoo! Groups Links







Re: GBW #11

Mark Mathu
 

Stan Mailer's GB&W book has three pictures of this engine: two on p
149 and one on p 177. All are post rebuilding though.
Thanks, I already am familiar with Stan Mailer's book.


Re: GBW #11

al_brown03
 

Stan Mailer's GB&W book has three pictures of this engine: two on p
149 and one on p 177. All are post rebuilding though.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., "Mark Mathu" <mark@m...> wrote:

Does anyone know of a source for an image of Green Bay & Western's
steam locomotive #11? I'm especially interested in an image from
before it was rebuilt in Green Bay in 1901.

The locomotive was originally built for predecessor railroad Green
Bay
& Minnesota as #11 "Samuel Sloan," later Green Bay Winona & St. Paul
#11, and then Green Bay & Western #11. It was scrapped by the GB&W
in
October 1934.

__________
Mark Mathu
Whitefish Bay, Wis.
"I started out with nothing and I still have most of it."


GBW #11

Mark Mathu
 

Does anyone know of a source for an image of Green Bay & Western's
steam locomotive #11? I'm especially interested in an image from
before it was rebuilt in Green Bay in 1901.

The locomotive was originally built for predecessor railroad Green Bay
& Minnesota as #11 "Samuel Sloan," later Green Bay Winona & St. Paul
#11, and then Green Bay & Western #11. It was scrapped by the GB&W in
October 1934.

__________
Mark Mathu
Whitefish Bay, Wis.
"I started out with nothing and I still have most of it."


Interchange cars, was early TOFC question

Garrett W. Rea <Garrett.Rea@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "h8fan" <jabutler@s...> wrote:


That is a little sad, but I'm not above taking a little modelers
license. Did any road have tofc cars in interchange service in the
early to mid 50s. Any models of cars other than the PRR cars?

Thanks to all who have provided info.

Jim Butler

I have some Tennessee Central train sheets for trains #81/84 Nashville-
Monterrey from 1955 that show a Pere Marquete flatcar (16750) loaded
with "trailers". Cannot say if that was TOFC (or Tote to us in the
South) or literally a shipment of some sort of trailers. Another PM
flat (16825) shows up empty in the same month (April).

Someone with some more PM knowledge or an ORER for the time may be
able to shed more light on this.

Garrett Rea
Nashville, TN


5' wheel base arch bar trucks

Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@...>
 

I'm interested in this question well, as a model I am working on could use shorter wheelbase trucks than the Kadee trucks - which are about 5' 6" or 8" (?) wheel base. I'm looking for 5'2", but 5'0" would probably work OK.

Another related question - does anyone know of an online article or discussion for narrowing the frame ov any arch bar truck. My model has laders / stirrup steps that will be interfered with by the trucks if they are as wide as the Kadee. I'm thinking of trying a home made mid section to fit into the side frame. But I'd like to know if anyone else has any ideas about how to do this. Ever consider cast metal from a styrene master?

Rob Kirkham


N&W class B7a & BS box cars

Fred Mullins
 

Folks,
I want to model some of these cars. Has anyone out there built one of
these? I was told that they had radial roofs. Not sure what one of them
looks like. Anyway I would like to know if these parts are availble in HO
scale?
Thanks for any help!
Fred Mullins
modeling the Atlantic & Danville
remember "For Service See......the A&D!"


Re: AC&F Type 11 (was Cities Service tank car question)

Jeff English
 

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@o...>
wrote:

<snip>

I'm not aware of any drawings of the Type 11, but the Type 11 design
was essentially the same as that of the Type 7, for which general
arrangement drawings are in Kaminski's book on p.219
Well, if the Type 11 is essentially the same as the Type 7, then why a
new Type designation?

Jeff English
Troy, New York
where the Bessemer steel-making process was first applied in the
western hemisphere, by Corning, Winslow & Co. in 1865


trucks

eabracher@...
 

Anyone know of a maker of 5 foot WB arch bar trucks in HO scale? needed
for a Yosemite Valley cattle car kit.

eric

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