Date   

Re: Sergent coupler experiments

Dennis Storzek <dstorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Jared Harper" <harper-brown@j...> wrote:

Recently I have experimented with fitting the Sergent coupler to
Accumate's scale width box (Dennis Storzek, are these boxes available
separately?).
No they are not, because I kind of hoped that Frank Sergent would do a
shank version to fit these, and he could then handle the sales of the
boxes. But Frank seems to be stalled on this project, so send me a
private e-mail telling me how many you want, and I'll give you a price.

I cut off the shank at the point the round hole and
the rectangular slot meet. I then narrowed the remaining shank on
each side of the rectangular slot. Using a round tapered file I
filed a circular hole at the top of the slot (nearest the coupler
head/knuckle) to match the curcular mounting boss in the Accumate
draftgear box. It fits like a charm and swivels fine.
Does it set the knuckle out far enough from the box? The striker horn
on the knuckle should be appx. three scale inches from the end of the
box, appx. .034". I looked at this once and decided the better way to
go would be to slice the boss out of the box, then the 0-80 screw just
fits in the back of the slot, with room for a couple of coils of the
"friction spring" in front of it. The problem with this set-up is the
need to close the end of the slot with something substantial enough to
take the draft forces of the entire train.

Dennis Storzek


ACF type 27 8K Navy, Gas & Supply Co. (CTTX) reweigh questions

oliver
 

I'm in the process of upgrading some IM kits for cars #8443 and 8447
(IM stock numbers) as supplied with extra tank bands (should be
four)and better underbody gear (RC to the rescue). My question is
about reweigh dates and stencils for these cars. Since IM goofed with
the prototype numbers on two band cars, I'd like to get better build
dates (should be earlier than 1-31) and later reweigh location (ie:
Denver ?)codes for these four band cars. Any help would be
appreciated. What was the max time allowable for reweighs for tank
cars again?
thanks in advance
Stefan Lerche'
Duncan, BC


Re: Old Conductor Books

Gary Roe
 

Gregg,

The contents are listed simply as "Merchandise".

gary roe



Gary,

It could well mean "Plus additional information contained on the waybill".
You don't say what the loads are, but if they were farm equipment, for
example, one machine might have been for Stansberry, with another for
another point down the line. Most railroads permitted up to three
"stop-offs" for a nominal fee. In the early 1960's when I first went to work
railroading, it was still only $25.

Gregg Mahlkov
Florida's Forgotten Coast


C & E I USRA TWIN HOPPERS

ihb080u4a
 

hello, I'm in need of info regarding Chicago and Eastern Illinois USRA
twin hoppers. Can anyone confirm the existance of these cars? Accurail
offers this car painted red, blt. 1919, reweigh date of 1953, car #
97260. If not bogus, what type of trucks and paint scheme would be
appropriate for circa 1953? the only info I have is as follows: 112
cars in 1953, series 97000-97260, 1880 cubic capacity.


War Emergency Gon

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Hey, Guys,

I'm assembling a Tichy War Emergency Gon, decorated for NYC 711555. This is a layout model for the
model railroad club, so perfection isn't required, but I do weather things and add a few details
before they go there, and I like to get things at least close. So, on the floor (since that's been
a discussion point lately) and the wood for the sides, I'm in agreement with Tony Thompson that
these parts were seldom creosoted, and therefore not black, or shiny black at any rate. But would
they have been painted? On the inside I mean? Clearly the outside surface of the sides were
painted. The model's painted black.

Also, the floor pattern has rectangular sections of the floor planking, at four locations,
symmetrically spaced, laterally centered, about 30" long. Are these steel pieces, part of the
underframe, flush with the floor?

Any other cautions and/or suggestions about this model?

TIA

SGL


Re: C&O Auto Box car

Scott Pitzer
 

Oh, I forgot about those!
Some information (or assumption) about these 1957 cars pointed to black cars with DF loaders, and brown without DF. But Virl Davis had labeled his b/w photo of an as-delivered DF car as "blue" and was confident about it. Seems like after this order, (and 500 similar 50' cars), C&O settled on black for specially equipped or assigned box cars, but only for a little while. And in 1959 came the yellow-sided insulated cars.
Scott Pitzer

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Sent: Jan 15, 2006 12:01 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: C&O Auto Box car


Scott Pitzer wrote

One comment in the review which doesn't ring true to me, is that
some of these cars received the "C&O blue scheme" but I just remembered,
that scheme came after 1960, so never mind!

Nope. No later than 1957. 19000-19499 were delivered in blue in 1957
with yellow letters, and yellow brake wheels.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Freight car flooring

Bruce Smith
 

On Sun, January 15, 2006 11:59 am, Richard Hendrickson wrote:
Flat car decks were almost always treated with some sort of
preservative, often creosote in the steam era. Typically, creosoted
wood weathered to a somewhat darker gray than untreated wood.
I'm going to jump on the boat with Tony Thompson on this one. It was my
impression that most wood used for flatcar decks and gon and boxcar
interiors was untreated. When I look at the construction records for the
PRR F30A for example, the flooring is listed as oak. It is hightly
unlikely that this was creosoted and no mention is made of treatment of
the wood. Recall that at during this time frame, oak was not valued as a
furniture wood, but was widely used in outdoor applications due to its
ability to resist rot.

I wonder too if this was a regional issue with ATSF using softer, poorer
quality of wood due to availability.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: Freight car flooring

Greg Martin
 

Bruce writes:

"I'm going to jump on the boat with Tony Thompson on this one. It was my
impression that most wood used for flatcar decks and gon and boxcar interiors
was untreated. When I look at the construction records for the PRR F30A for
example, the flooring is listed as oak. It is highly (ed) unlikely that this
was creosoted and no mention is made of treatment of the wood. Recall that
at during this time frame, oak was not valued as a furniture wood, but was
widely used in outdoor applications due to its ability to resist rot.

I wonder too if this was a regional issue with ATSF using softer, poorer
quality of wood due to availability.

Regards
Bruce"


I can tell you that from the AWPA shows that wood left untreated last about
seven years with the best results at fourteen years for Alaskan Yellow Cedar.
So that being a known, then it wouldn't make much sense to leave decks of
flats and gondolas left untreated at least if it were to be exposed constantly.
The cost of treating wood, any wood, is not that expensive given the
replacement value. There are some imported hardwood like Apiton (sp?) that are used
for truck beds but very expensive. As for OAK not being considered a
furniture wood, well that is a misnomer completely as even Frank Lloyd Wright was
big on the use of straight grain Oak for not only furniture as well as wall
paneling. I once had a desk made of wood dated in the twenties and built in
Missouri.

I do believe that untreated wood was used say for the side sheathing of
composite designed cars and possibly floors(for hoppers and gondolas) but again
most railroads re-sheathed these cars in about the same timeframe as you would
have expected the wood to finally be deteriorated. As for the railroad that
didn't, one only needs to look at the condition of those cars to see why most
did. For the east most cars were commonly sheathed with Southern Yellow Pine
or sometimes Hemlock and these are a true softwood. Do to length structure
Oak was just not a common wood was likely used for the decks but that doesn't
mean it wouldn't rot in the same given time period and it was and still is
far more expensive than other woods as well as heavier.


No photos I've seen would lead me to believe that flat especially were not
treated, especially given that they were in the seventies and beyond. Was
labor so cheap in the shops that the railroads could afford to begin replacing
decks in this timeframe? It unfortunate that more accurate record weren't kept.

Greg Martin


ALPS printers was Re: Decals and color lasers

Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton <smokeandsteam@...>
 

The Alps Micro Dry printers were withdrawn from the US market about
2000. Alps USA do offer an exchange program whereby you can send in a
dead printer and get a refurbished one for between $250 and $350 US, and
European users can get the same sort of deal from Alps in Ireland. Both
programs may be running down as the number of printers still in service
declines



There is also a vendor in Australia selling new MD1000 printers which
are sourced form Alps in Japan. Some eBay vendors do offer refurbished
or remanufactured Alps printers at close to their original cost when
new.



The Alps printers do have some limitations when printing some colours
due to the limited resolution - oranges, reds and some other colours
are especially tricky and can result in a somewhat spotty appearance –
this sort of work is something lasers and inkjets seem to handle much
better. Where they do excel is in their ability to print white and
metallic or foil colours.



The European market OKI DP5000 printer is compatible with the MD5000
cartridges ( it’s essentially a badge engineered MD5000 with a power
supply that will take 240V AC) but OKI has some additional ink colours
which are not backward compatible without some clever workarounds
involving the bar codes on the cartridges. These include red, blue,
green and, I believe, orange and these can be used to get around some of
the Alps limitations with these colours.



The Kodak First Check Proofer is a much more professionally oriented
device and sells for about $US5000.The package includes RIP software and
handles larger paper sizes which may account for some of the increased
cost. They do appear on eBay from time to time, however the same caveats
apply here as to the Alps product – they suffer from occasional print
head problems which cannot be repaired by the end-user and if you get a
dead machine it has to be exchanged or repaired at not insignificant
cost. Like the DP 5000 the range of inks includes a wider range of
colours than the basic CMYK, white and the metallic and foil ribbons.
These can be used on some Alps printers if you can figure out the bar
codes to trick the machine into thinking it has Alps cartridges.



Unless you’re planning to go into business a used Alps machine in good
condition or a refurbished one may be worth considering if printing
white or metallic or foil colours is a necessity. However they aren’t
really up to intensive use needed for production work- in this case the
Kodak printer might be a better investment



Aidrian

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
jerryglow2
Sent: Sunday, January 15, 2006 11:27 AM
Strange thing is, that they are actually producing for Kodak using
the same technology and from what I understand, having at least some
compatibility on the cartirdges.

_____


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1/14/2006



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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Decals and color lasers

jerryglow2
 

Strange thing is, that they are actually producing for Kodak using
the same technology and from what I understand, having at least some
compatibility on the cartirdges.

Jerry Glow


--- In STMFC@..., "Jon Miller" <atsf@i...> wrote:

Fairly easy assuming you can
get a color match to the body.<
I'm thinking this would be a huge problem, getting a color
match.

You mean like the ALPS?<
ALPS is really old technology now. They used a tape and while
good the
cost of the tape compared to a cartidge full of toner had no cost
comparison.

I have heard by rumor that some is made in UK but have never
been given
any direct connections, like email address or company contact.

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Freight car flooring

Tim O'Connor
 

I have to agree with Tony. I've seen photos of cars with completely
untreated brand new decks. I know Santa Fe used creosoted decks, and
others did too. But not everyone did. Some decks were simply painted.

After all, if running boards and wood roofs were not creosoted, then
why would you need to (necessarily) creosote flat car decks?

Tim O'Connor

Based on looking at steam-era builder photos of flat cars, I
dispute that this was the most common treatment. Most new decks are not
dark colored at all. They might of course be untreated, but they surely
are not black. Untreated wood weathers in the direction of gray, so for
a well-aged car that's the color desired regardless of original
treatment.

Tony Thompson


Re: Old Conductor Books

ljack70117@...
 

On Jan 15, 2006, at 11:49 AM, Gregg Mahlkov wrote:

Gary,

It could well mean "Plus additional information contained on the waybill".
You don't say what the loads are, but if they were farm equipment, for
example, one machine might have been for Stansberry, with another for
another point down the line. Most railroads permitted up to three
"stop-offs" for a nominal fee. In the early 1960's when I first went to work
railroading, it was still only $25.

Gregg Mahlkov
Florida's Forgotten Coast
This is true about stop off but you paid the full car load rate to the furthest destination.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@...


Re: Old Conductor Books

Tim O'Connor
 

I would guess that they are "way" cars, loaded with LCL for
intermediate stations, but finally destined for those stations.

I have a few old (1906-1907) Wabash Conductor books that I have been looking at in detail the couple of weeks. One of the things that I am curious about is a notation that I found in the "final destination" column for a couple cars. The train was WB from Saint Louis to Moberly and had some cars for points beyond. The final destination for one was shown as "Stanberry+way", the other was shown as "Clyde+way". (Stanberry and Clyde are both towns on the Wabash line to Council Bluffs) What does the "+way" mean? Is that shorthand for the car needs to be weighed? Or could it be these cars were LCL or "way" cars?

gary roe


Re: Freight car flooring

Tony Thompson
 

Greg Martin wrote:
Richard is correct  for most of the
years that this list covers the favored treating for flat car  decks
was
creosote, which is a derivative of coal tar, from the coking  process
of coal
(thus those Koppers tanks cars). It was generally a glossy  black to a semi gloss
as it was pulled from the tubes but dulled in time and  faded to gray
shades
over time.
Based on looking at steam-era builder photos of flat cars, I
dispute that this was the most common treatment. Most new decks are not
dark colored at all. They might of course be untreated, but they surely
are not black. Untreated wood weathers in the direction of gray, so for
a well-aged car that's the color desired regardless of original
treatment.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Decals and color lasers

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

Fairly easy assuming you can
get a color match to the body.<
I'm thinking this would be a huge problem, getting a color match.

You mean like the ALPS?<
ALPS is really old technology now. They used a tape and while good the
cost of the tape compared to a cartidge full of toner had no cost
comparison.

I have heard by rumor that some is made in UK but have never been given
any direct connections, like email address or company contact.

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Freight car flooring

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jan 15, 2006, at 7:16 AM, Ron Christensen wrote:

The flat cars I have observed were bleached out wood. with a
gray coloring.
My question is did the railroads use treated or creosoted lumber
for flooring?
Flat car decks were almost always treated with some sort of
preservative, often creosote in the steam era. Typically, creosoted
wood weathered to a somewhat darker gray than untreated wood.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Old Conductor Books

Gregg Mahlkov <mahlkov@...>
 

Gary,

It could well mean "Plus additional information contained on the waybill". You don't say what the loads are, but if they were farm equipment, for example, one machine might have been for Stansberry, with another for another point down the line. Most railroads permitted up to three "stop-offs" for a nominal fee. In the early 1960's when I first went to work railroading, it was still only $25.

Gregg Mahlkov
Florida's Forgotten Coast

----- Original Message -----
From: "gary roe" <wabashrr@...>
To: "Steam Era Freightcars" <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sunday, January 15, 2006 11:34 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Old Conductor Books


I have a few old (1906-1907) Wabash Conductor books that I have been looking at in detail the couple of weeks. One of the things that I am curious about is a notation that I found in the "final destination" column for a couple cars. The train was WB from Saint Louis to Moberly and had some cars for points beyond. The final destination for one was shown as "Stanberry+way", the other was shown as "Clyde+way". (Stanberry and Clyde are both towns on the Wabash line to Council Bluffs) What does the "+way" mean? Is that shorthand for the car needs to be weighed? Or could it be these cars were LCL or "way" cars?

gary roe





Yahoo! Groups Links







Old Conductor Books

Gary Roe
 

I have a few old (1906-1907) Wabash Conductor books that I have been looking at in detail the couple of weeks. One of the things that I am curious about is a notation that I found in the "final destination" column for a couple cars. The train was WB from Saint Louis to Moberly and had some cars for points beyond. The final destination for one was shown as "Stanberry+way", the other was shown as "Clyde+way". (Stanberry and Clyde are both towns on the Wabash line to Council Bluffs) What does the "+way" mean? Is that shorthand for the car needs to be weighed? Or could it be these cars were LCL or "way" cars?

gary roe


Re: Walthers Trainline X29 boxcar

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Richard White asked:
"From reading the varous postings on ratio's and distribution of
boxcars, I can see that I need about three PRR X29's for my railroad.
I saw a note on a website about PRR cars that the Walthers Trainline
X29 boxcar model needs some work to bring it up to a reasonable
standard. Has anyone on group had a close look at one of these and
can you tell me what needs to be done?"

Richard, see my article on upgrading the Walthers/Train-Miniature
article in the June 2004 issue of The Keystone Modeler. It's no
longer online, but it's available on CD (along with the first two
years of TKM). See this month's issue of TKM for ordering details.
http://www.prrths.com/Keystone%20Modeler/Keystone_Modeler_PDFs/TKM%
20No.%2030%2001-06%20PDF.pdf

Jerry Glow replied:
"It's the old Train Minature tooling and if you consider your time
worth anything (and the results) I'd stick with the Red Caboose
model. They are quite well done and even have prototypical
differences and variations."

I agree with Jerry. I only recommend this project if you already
have these models. If you're starting from scratch, I highly
recommend using the Red Caboose models. The one thing to watch out
for on the Red Caboose models is the AB brake detailing, which is
incorrect for cars originally built with KD brakes converted to AB
brakes. It is correct only for cars built new with AB brakes (all
dreadnaught end cars, possibly a few late flat end cars). See the
July 2004 TKM for how to correct this.


Ben Hom


Freight car flooring

ron christensen
 

In the last issue of RMC, Stan Rydarowicz had a good article on
floor color.
As I remember the box cars used for grain had untreated wood
floors, that turned gray with a bit of tan color.
The flat cars I have observed were bleached out wood. with a
gray coloring.
My question is did the railroads use treated or creosoted lumber
for flooring?
A search of the web site didn't find an answer.
Ron Christensen

146901 - 146920 of 196937