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Re: Couplers - prototype drawings including major measurements

Larry Kline
 

Jim Betz wrote:
Anyone have a link to an online site that has drawings of 1:1 scale RR
couplers?

There are drawings for the type E coupler introduced in 1930 at:
http://www.mcconway.com/rail_prod/couplers.htm

Larry Kline
Pittsburgh, PA


Re: ASF basic trucks was NKP/WLE 78000 series 70 ton hopper

Patrick Wider <pwider@...>
 

I can't let this one go. One of the things wrong with "Accurail" AAR trucks with spring
planks is that they lack at least 99% of the spring plank. They do feature no more than 1%
of the spring plank when viewed from the side. I wish some model manufacturer would
correct this.

Pat Wider

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@o...> wrote:

As Dennis points out, Accurail
modeled Bettendorf's version of the AAR standard truck with spring
planks, so the prototype for the Accurail truck is literally a
Bettendorf truck...........


Re: 1898-1900 ORER Request

Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

Scott - Contact me off list and I'll send you the relevant 1900 page. - Al Westerfield

Could someone with an ORER from this time range please lookup the
entry for the Monongahela River Railroad and let me know what it shows
for them.


Re: ASF basic trucks

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
Another mystery solved. Thanks, Richard.
That wasn't in any of the Cycs I have.
Always check the bio section in the back of White's _The American Railroad Freight Car_ for this kind of info.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: ASF basic trucks was NKP/WLE 78000 series 70 ton hopper

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Another mystery solved. Thanks, Richard.

That wasn't in any of the Cycs I have.

SGL

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Richard Hendrickson
Sent: Sunday, January 22, 2006 2:08 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: ASF basic trucks was NKP/WLE 78000
series 70 ton hopper

On Jan 22, 2006, at 10:48 AM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

And who was "Barber?"
John C. Barber founded the Standard Car Truck Co. (which
still exists) in 1896.

Richard Hendrickson







Yahoo! Groups Links






Re: Youngstown Doors

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
From my notes I show only one batch of PSC B-50-25's 20500-21499
and two batches of PS cars 21500-21749 and 21750-22249. (And two
PS batches for T&NO) Which ones had wide seam doors?
The 1946 cars had the wide-seam doors: the PSC cars and the lower-number batch you list of P-S cars. The second or 1947 batch, the higher P-S numbers, had the follow-on door. For T&NO, likewise, the first P-S batch in 1946, 54850-55199, had the wide-seam doors, while the second batch, 55200-55699, had the later or 1947 doors.
Obviously Ted's mini-kit is designed to do any of the 1946 batches (which altogether total 1600 cars), but the most visible change to the 1947 cars (total, 1000 cars) was the doors, so with different doors one could model them too.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: G29 TKM article

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Bruce Smith wrote:
"It is in TKM 14, which is no longer on the site, but is available
from the PRRT&HS on CD for $15 ($30 for issues 1-24)"

The price Bruce quoted is for PRRT&HS members only. The non-member
price is $45.


Ben Hom


Re: PS-2 conversions

oak767 <clcasper@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@s...> wrote:

Chris Casper wrote:
I have two questions for the group.

1.) Which issue of TKM has the modeling article on the PRR G29 ,
is it
still
available, and where can I acquire a copy?
Go to the PRRH&TS Web site.

2.) According to a car folio I have seen, the Santa Fe converted
three
PS-2
LOs for Filtrol Slurry service. Can anyone tell me what the
conversion
entailed, and if there are any pictures or drawings of these cars?
Seems unlikely that these are pre-1960 cars, but if they
are,
that's legitimate.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@s...
Publishers of books on railroad history
The folio has a 1957 date. Maybe I'm pushing the edge.


Re: ASF basic trucks was NKP/WLE 78000 series 70 ton hopper

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jan 22, 2006, at 10:48 AM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

And who was "Barber?"
John C. Barber founded the Standard Car Truck Co. (which still exists)
in 1896.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Couplers - prototype drawings including major measurements

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jan 21, 2006, at 9:22 PM, Jim Betz wrote:

  Anyone have a link to an online site that has drawings of
1:1 scale RR couplers?  I thought I'd look at how they are
actually put together.  Or some other source for same?
I'm not aware of any on-line source for such information, but of course
the subject is covered copiously in the various issues of the Car
Builders' Cyclopedias.

Not to pick on Jim, who obviously means well, but his inquiry prompts
me to repeat what I have said on this list before, which is that vast
amounts of information about freight car history (and many other
things) cannot be found on the internet, at least not yet, and is
available only in print. Serious research requires more than
curiosity, a keyboard, and a modem.

Richard Hendrickson


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: ASF basic trucks was NKP/WLE 78000 series 70 ton hopper

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Standard Car Truck Co., . . . applied the name Barber to all
of its numerous proprietary design features (e.g., lateral
motion bolsters, spring loaded friction wedge bolster
snubbers). Standard re-designed the caboose truck, using
Bettendorf's swing motion bolster concept, and thereafter
called it a Barber-Bettendorf truck.
And who was "Barber?"


And that's probably more than many list members ever wanted
to know about freight car trucks.
Naw, there's ton's more to learn.

SGL


Re: G29 TKM article

Bruce Smith
 

On Sun, January 22, 2006 11:59 am, Chris Casper wrote:
Hi All,

I have two questions for the group.

1.) Which issue of TKM has the modeling article on the PRR G29 , is it
still
available, and where can I acquire a copy?
It is in TKM 14, which is no longer on the site, but is available from the
PRRT&HS on CD for $15 ($30 for issues 1-24)

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: ASF basic trucks was NKP/WLE 78000 series 70 ton hopper

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jan 22, 2006, at 9:13 AM, Dennis Storzek wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Larry Kline <lndkline@v...> wrote:
>
> Does anyone have good photos of _ASF basic_ trucks from the 1944 to
> 1949 period? They are listed in the ASF ad in the 1946 CBCyc. The
> trucks are listed as _cast steel ASF basic...

How about just going back to the common (Kalmbach reprint) 1940 CBC?
This has several pages of information  and drawings presented by the
"Board of Trustees under the Four Wheel Railway Truck Agreement" which
I believe was the instrument that made the AAR design available to all
manufacturers. On the following page (Sec. 15-1120) is the ASF ad that
shows a pre Ride Control truck equipped with a Simplex Snubber (in the
spring pack) and what appear to be side frames of identical pattern to
the A-3 truck, although they probably don't have the wear surfaces for
the later Ride Control wedges, which don't show anyway on a model.
Also illustrated is a side frame that matches the drawings on the
previous pages, labeled "Double Truss Side Frame for freight cars".
This is most likely what ASF was calling the "Basic Truck"; a set of
castings to make a truck of the basic AAR design without any ASF
proprietary improvements.
Dennis provides, as usual, a clear and insightful response, reminding
me that ASF did, indeed, produce non-ride-control trucks with the same
bulge at the bottom of the side frames which was a distinctive feature
of the A-3 trucks.

While I'm at it, I need to put to rest the comments that the Accurail
"Bettendorf" truck has no prototype. Flip the page, to Sec. 15-1122
and you will find the products of The Bettendorf Co. listed (this is
before they became Barber-Bettendorf)....
I don't recall anyone claiming that the Accurail truck lacks a
prototype. I have often asserted that many model RR manufacturers
mis-use the name "Bettendorf" for any truck of ARA or AAR
specifications which has the journal boxes cast integral with the side
frames, but that's a different issue. As Dennis points out, Accurail
modeled Bettendorf's version of the AAR standard truck with spring
planks, so the prototype for the Accurail truck is literally a
Bettendorf truck, i.e., manufactured by Bettendorf, though the design
is almost indistinguishable (at least at 3.5 mm=1 ft.) from that of
similar trucks made by other manufacturers. That's why it's one of the
most useful freight car trucks in HO scale, other manufacturers having
often modeled some version of the AAR self-aligning spring-plankless
design and incorrectly labeled it "Bettendorf."

One correction, though. Bettendorf didn't "become" Barber-Bettendorf.
They simply got out of the car truck business ca. 1942 and sold the
rights to their swing-motion caboose truck to the Standard Car Truck
Co., which applied the name Barber to all of its numerous proprietary
design features (e.g., lateral motion bolsters, spring loaded friction
wedge bolster snubbers). Standard re-designed the caboose truck, using
Bettendorf's swing motion bolster concept, and thereafter called it a
Barber-Bettendorf truck.

And that's probably more than many list members ever wanted to know
about freight car trucks.

Richard Hendrickson


1898-1900 ORER Request

Scott Seders
 

Could someone with an ORER from this time range please lookup the
entry for the Monongahela River Railroad and let me know what it shows
for them.

Please note this is not the Monongahela Railroad from Brownsville, PA.

Thanks,
Scott Seders


(No subject)

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Chris Casper wrote:
I have two questions for the group.

1.) Which issue of TKM has the modeling article on the PRR G29 , is it still
available, and where can I acquire a copy?
Go to the PRRH&TS Web site.

2.) According to a car folio I have seen, the Santa Fe converted three PS-2
LOs for Filtrol Slurry service. Can anyone tell me what the conversion
entailed, and if there are any pictures or drawings of these cars?
Seems unlikely that these are pre-1960 cars, but if they are, that's legitimate.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


PRR Class G29 Article - TKM

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Chris Casper asked:
"Which issue of TKM has the modeling article on the PRR G29 , is it
still available, and where can I acquire a copy?"

Elden Gatwood's G29 article appeared in the September 2004 issue of
TKM. It's no longer at the society's website, but is available on CD
(along with the first 24 issues). Ordering information is on the last
page of this month's TKM:
http://www.prrths.com/Keystone%20Modeler/Keystone_Modeler_PDFs/TKM%
20No.%2030%2001-06%20PDF.pdf


Ben Hom


Re: ASF basic trucks was NKP/WLE 78000 series 70 ton hopper

Larry Kline
 

Dennis,
Thanks for the reply. I have the 1940 Cyc, I should have checked.
Actually, the truck shown at the top of p1120, i.e. the one that looks
like an A-3 without the triangular enclosures for the friction wedges,
is apparently the ASF basic truck. It is the truck that is shown in
several photos of the W&LE cars I listed in my earlier email.

Dennis Storzek wrote:
How about just going back to the common (Kalmbach reprint) 1940 CBC? On
the page (Sec. 15-1120) is the ASF ad that shows [snip] what appear to
be side frames of identical pattern to the A-3 truck, although they
probably don't have the wear surfaces for the later Ride Control
wedges, which don't show anyway on a model. Also illustrated is a side
frame that matches the drawings on the previous pages, labeled "Double
Truss Side Frame for freight cars". This is most likely what ASF was
calling the "Basic Truck"; a set of castings to make a truck of the
basic AAR design without any ASF proprietary improvements.

BTW, I'm going to be surprised and disappointed if I can't see the
triangular enclosures for the friction wedges on the upcoming O scale
ASF A-3 trucks from San Juan.

Larry Kline
Pittsburgh, PA


(No subject)

Chris Casper <clcasper@...>
 

Hi All,

I have two questions for the group.

1.) Which issue of TKM has the modeling article on the PRR G29 , is it still
available, and where can I acquire a copy?

2.) According to a car folio I have seen, the Santa Fe converted three PS-2
LOs for Filtrol Slurry service. Can anyone tell me what the conversion
entailed, and if there are any pictures or drawings of these cars?

Thanks for any help.

Chris Casper
clcasper@means.net


Re: Remarks

Patrick Wider <pwider@...>
 

This version of model railroading folk-law is not entirely true. The error was discovered
when I attempted to fit an InterMountain roof to the Branchline 41' box car and
immediately exclaimed, "Someone is wrong." Ed Hawkins was sitting to my right at the
time. I quickly determined who was the "villain" after I retrieved a dial caliper from my
basement. Ed passed on the "bad news" to Branchline.

Regarding "hurtful" criticism of a product, most manufacturers realize that if they can't
stand the heat, they should get out of the kitchen and they don't take it personally. Some
manufacturers ignore the heat and keep making junk. That's their niche. Others take
pride in what they do and try their darndest to correct or avoid errors in the first place.
Being human, having limited resources, and subject to "Murphy's Law", some errors
ultimately slip through. I know first hand. In aviation, they can kill people; with toy trains,
the penalties are much less severe. A 41' toy box car is one example of the latter.

Pat Wider

Or tried to fit another manufacturer's roof to it (IMWX?), which is
how Ed Hawkins discovered the error. Parts that are interchangeable at
the prototype level should theoretically be interchangeable on our
models, within the limitations of how model manufacturers design their
products.

Tom Madden


Re: ASF basic trucks was NKP/WLE 78000 series 70 ton hopper

pullmanboss <tgmadden@...>
 

Gene Green:
By now you all know where I live so I'll quit repeating that. No
one gave the response I was hoping to elicit.
That's because there's no layout in Rosa's cantina.

Tom Madden

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