Date   

Re: Southern Pacific Decals

jim peters
 

Ted,

Please put me down for 2 sets.

Many thanks,

Jim Peters
Coquitlam, B.C.


From: Ted Culotta <tculotta@speedwitch.com>
Reply-To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Southern Pacific Decals
Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2006 05:51:43 -0500


On Jan 4, 2006, at 9:42 AM, jim peters wrote:

Gentlemen,

A question for the SP modelers. My current project is an SP B-50-25
boxcar
(SP order P-3040) and I'm looking for the decals of the 1946 to '52
lettering scheme. I couldn't see what I was looking for in the Micro
Scale
catalog. CDS has a fair selection of transition era SP, but I would
have to
put 2 or 3 sets together for the lettering scheme I want. Seems
funny, go
to an Eastern Canadian company to purchase lettering for a boxcar from
the
American Southwest. Where do you SP guys go for your decals? Por
favor
Jim:

I have them in hand for these cars, but have not yet released them yet.
They will be announced here first once I am ready to ship.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
645 Tanner Marsh Road, Guilford, CT 06437
info@speedwitch.com
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912
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Re: Which tank cars?

Jim and Lisa Hayes <jimandlisa97225@...>
 

Are Sanborn maps available for your area?
I checked my county library system and the answer is yes on microfilm but
the newest is from 1931. More than a little early for my '50s question.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon


Re: El Paso

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Doug Polinder wrote:
El Paso may not have a great hobby shop, but in Our Era of Choice where else could you go to see T&P, RI (maybe? if it ran through from Tucumcari), and ATSF . . .
To my knowledge, RI did NOT run through beyond Tucumcari in steam or early diesel days. After 1960, I don't know.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Covered Hoppers

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Brian R. Termunde wrote:
Now on to more serious business. One of the industries on my 1952 era Grand Canyon District will be a Gravel Pit (at Pitt, Ariz.). While I will need hoppers, and gons, it seems to me that I read someplace about the use of covered hoppers. Now I cannot seem to find the post where I had read it. I'm not sure if it was on this list, or another. But would there have been a use for covered hoppers or not? BTW, the cinders mined were volcanic, if that makes a difference. TIA!
I'd say "no" unless something like locomotive sand was also produced. Cinders certainly don't need a "lid."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Which tank cars?

al_brown03
 

Are Sanborn maps available for your area?

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Jim and Lisa Hayes"
<jimandlisa97225@v...> wrote:

Which tank cars are correct for the late '50s in the Northwest?
No, I'm not
looking for specific advice. I didn't live in the Northwest in the
1950s so
I can't reach back into my own memories.
Most of the tank cars I buy/build are plain Jane black because
that's what
most of them were and I'm less likely to go wrong with them. I'd
like to
have one decorated with a flying red horse or a flying A or a
billboard
Sinclair or some such. But where do I look for the era and location
information I need to choose correct models? Where do I look to
find out if
Mobil or Flying A or Sinclair or whoever had gas stations here
then? Old
phone books? Business directories? Or ??? Suggestions gladly
accepted.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon


Re: Admin: End of Perceptions of distance

Ed Mims
 

To Mike Brock,

This is perhaps the most interesting "thread" in months and even you contributed to it, but you are the "OWNER" and the omnpotent. Thanks(?).

Ed Mims
Jacksonville, FL

Mike Brock <brockm@brevard.net> wrote:
Jim Hayes writes:


Back at the beginning of WWII my father escorted a Japanese diplomat from
the East coast to the West coast, by train of course.
As usual, I get the last word...It is interesting to note that...of all
people...Japanese General Tojo traveled across the US by train prior to WW2.
Assuming he went by the shortest route to San Francisco, one must assume he,
too, went over Sherman Hill...proving once again that...

And, now without further ado...the thread about where the West begins [ and
I always thought it was Fort Worth...at least that's what was said in that
movie and would a movie lie? ] is officially terminated...along with the
geography lessons. Frt cars, guys, frt cars.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner




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Re: El Paso

Charles Morrill <badlands@...>
 

Ahh! And to further apply the mix, the SP in El Paso was actually the T&NO (in STMFC times) using much of the facilities built by the EP&SW. The short line (don't have the name at the moment) acting as a bridge with Juarez was also in the mix. And there was some great railroad hobby shops there during that time.
Charlie

----- Original Message -----
From: "Doug Polinder" <mikado3399@yahoo.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2006 4:35 PM
Subject: [STMFC] El Paso


El Paso may not have a great hobby shop, but in Our Era of Choice where else could you go to see T&P, RI (maybe? if it ran through from Tucumcari), and ATSF along with Espee, and for real variety cross the border to Ju�rez to see Ferrocarril Chihuahua al Pac�fico rolling stock with truss rods and arch bar trucks, none of which could be interchanged with US roads because it did not meet AAR requirements. (This continued to be an issue into The Era We Do Not Name on This List; at least thirty years after the cutoff date of STMFC we at BN wanted to use some FNM surplus gons in connection with a barge operation out of Galveston but could not because e.g. appliances such as grabs were not the proper distance from the car side.)

I regret Gene no longer ends his posts with the line from the Marty Robbins song.

Doug "wishing he were from Saginaw MI or Muskogee OK so he could refer to old Merle Haggard songs in the tag line" Polinder
Lowell MI


Doug Polinder
Grand Rapids MI

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Re: PFE Q

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim "unreconstructed" O'Connort wrote:
Sounds like the most important consideration of car construction
back then was how big a tax loophole you could drive it through!
And your point is? and you think things have changed??

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Photos Needed

Richard Hendrickson
 

I am in need of photos of the following freight cars:

Central of Georgia 4500-4749 – 1837 spec. AAR 40' steel box cars as
built (before getting wider doors, reinforced side sills, etc.)

lllinois Central 5000-50299 – 40' steel refrigerator cars built in
1937; I need a photo of one as repainted in the 1940s with olive green
instead of aluminum roof.

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Covered Hoppers

Brian Termunde
 

In a message dated 1/26/2006 8:38:06 P.M. Mountain Standard Time,
dsmith@davinci-center.org writes:

I could suggest that small lapilli could easily have been transported in
covered hoppers, but that would be speculating in the absence of data, and we
wouldn't want to do that, would we.

---> Well being that there is no known data...let's speculate! <G> Two
questions, first and foremost, is this something that would have be actively
shipped in the early 1950's? If so, what would it have been used for? Thanks
David. I appreciate the assistance!


Take Care!

Brian R. Termunde
West Jordan, Utah

"Ship and Travel the Grand Canyon Line!"
Grand Canyon Railway
Utah District


WWII open car loading

Doug Polinder
 

Unfortunately DeNevi's book does not have a whole lot in the way of useful pictures to help create interesting military matériel loads on flats and in gons, but it DOES have a picture of scantily clad (for the era) women in kind of a Ben Hur chariot-race pose pulling SP 5004--perhaps to demonstrate the effectiveness of Timken rolling bearings (see p. 48; alas, another prewar shot in an ostensibly WWII-era book). There is a picture on the same page of two M4s on what appears to be a 53' flat; view is partially obscured by another AFV. Photo was taken at Indio CA, so could an Espee-ophile take a shot at identifying the car series? Could this be a 70-ton car, or do two Shermans not exceed the capacity of a 50 ton car?

I have used the AAR's Pamphlet no. MD-7, "Loading of Department of Defense Materiel [sic] On Open Top Cars," for a guide to blocking and bracing, but the date is October 1, 1953, so I hope the rules did not change significantly between WWII and the publication date. This tome and the copy of the loading guide for open-top cars I recently purchased from Richard are two of the most valuable books in my library. And yes, the various GN color guides do reveal several flat cars with freshly painted vermilion decks; I imagine they stayed in that condition for exactly one loaded trip.

Doug "actually a native of the Deepest Northwest" Polinder
Lowell MI


Doug Polinder
Grand Rapids MI

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Re: Hwy 66/ATSF

Brian Termunde
 

In a message dated 1/26/2006 7:57:27 P.M. Mountain Standard Time,
tgmadden@worldnet.att.net writes:

Recreating the Steam Era takes more than an assemblage of accurate models.
It's establishing an atmosphere, it's Al's oncoming headlight, it's Richard's
hang-on-for-dear-life cab ride at speed. You needn't have experienced these
things first-hand as long as you can let yourself be transported by the
accountings of those who did. If you can do that, then when you stand in Mike's UP
layout you can actually imagine yourself in the Laramie engine terminal. The
pulsing of Alemite guns, the thump of air compressors, the hiss of steam, the
smell of hot metal and soft coal smoke.... What an experience! What a hobby!!


---> Wow Tom, you really nailed it! This is one of the reasons that I'm on
this list. I want people to feel like it is 1952, and to feel the things that
you mention. I am willing to accept reasonable stand-ins if needed. But
nothing should detract from the overall scene. Those folks that will run a Railgon
behind an E unit might be having fun (which is great), but they will never be
able to recreate the moods and excitement that only a prototype based model
railroad can.

---> Which issue of the Warbonnet has that Richard Hendrickson article
appear in? I have GOT to get that one. TIA!


Take Care!

Brian R. Termunde
West Jordan, Utah

"Ship and Travel the Grand Canyon Line!"
Grand Canyon Railway
Utah District


B&O Modeler #2 vol 1 is out

Dean Payne <deanpayne@...>
 

The B&O Modeler #2 vol 1 is out. Included is an article on modeling
the B&O USRA SS cement service car.


http://borhs.org/ModelerMag/

Dean Payne


Re: steam era oil companies

Tim O'Connor
 

Well for goodness sake, whadda expect me to do, write it myself?? :-)
I'm not sure Richard has all the data to hand, but I'd wager he knows
where to find it. I'll proofread it if that will help...

Tim O.

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@sunlink.net>
timboconnor@comcast.net wrote:
Now how do you propose gathering the data besides probing Richard
Hendrickson?


Re: steam era oil companies

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

timboconnor@comcast.net wrote:


Tim,

For a modeler I would think a region-by-region listing of which oil
companies operated outlets in those regions broken down by decade
(spreadsheet style) would give very useful insight into what brands of
oil were sold where.

And then for each brand, a timeline matrix show what reporting marks
were in use for each region and time period.

I don't think it needs to be a book length article. I'm not interested in
the history of the oil companies per se. I'm only interested in tangible
changes in the fleets and geographical dispersion of freight cars.

Maps showing the locations of refineries and oil depots (e.g. pipeline
terminals, and ports) would be extremely interesting, and also don't
need to be book length -- maybe 10 or 15 pages? :-)

I definitely think this would fit well into the RPC format, and also be in
line with the focus of RPC.
Tim,

Now how do you propose gathering the data besides probing Richard Hendrickson?

Hope to run across you in Springfield, Tim Gilbert


El Paso

Doug Polinder
 

El Paso may not have a great hobby shop, but in Our Era of Choice where else could you go to see T&P, RI (maybe? if it ran through from Tucumcari), and ATSF along with Espee, and for real variety cross the border to Juárez to see Ferrocarril Chihuahua al Pacífico rolling stock with truss rods and arch bar trucks, none of which could be interchanged with US roads because it did not meet AAR requirements. (This continued to be an issue into The Era We Do Not Name on This List; at least thirty years after the cutoff date of STMFC we at BN wanted to use some FNM surplus gons in connection with a barge operation out of Galveston but could not because e.g. appliances such as grabs were not the proper distance from the car side.)

I regret Gene no longer ends his posts with the line from the Marty Robbins song.

Doug "wishing he were from Saginaw MI or Muskogee OK so he could refer to old Merle Haggard songs in the tag line" Polinder
Lowell MI


Doug Polinder
Grand Rapids MI

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Re: Which tank cars?

Spen Kellogg <spenkell@...>
 

GCRDS@aol.com wrote:

Tim, you drive 90 miles for gas?? Why, don't they have any gas stations in Massachusetts? Ninety miles back east can be three or four states, where out here, it's a round trip between Salt Lake and either of our neighbors, Ogden or Provo! <G>
Geez. I was told by a University of Utah student that Provo was a suburb of Salt Lake City. It seemed that way when we drove down for a BYU game. <VBG>

Regards, Spen Kellogg


Re: PFE Q

John Boren <mccjbcmd@...>
 

Sounds like the most important consideration of car construction
back then was how big a tax loophole you could drive it through!

Tim "unreconstructed" O'Connor
As an accountant I can tell you that many business decisions are highly
impacted by tax considerations, and sometimes it seems like the tax break is
the ONLY reason some things were done.

Most railroad histories are missing the economic reasons which underlay
nearly all of the decisions the railroads made. Of course these financial
considerations often weren't documented, so their omission is not primarily
due to a lack of interest in them.

John Boren


Re: Covered Hoppers

Brian Termunde
 

In a message dated 1/26/2006 5:28:10 P.M. Mountain Standard Time,
thompson@signaturepress.com writes:

I'd say "no" unless something like locomotive sand was also produced.
Cinders certainly don't need a "lid."

---> No, I can't see volcanic cinders being used for sand. Could it have
been roofing granule's? I know that it would not have been for ballast, as that
would have been gon's and hoppers, it would have to been something else that
would use volcanic cinders, perhaps the finer particles that could not have
been shipped in hoppers or gons. I guess that I will need to scratch those cars
off my list. Thanks again!


Take Care!

Brian R. Termunde
West Jordan, Utah

"Ship and Travel the Grand Canyon Line!"
Grand Canyon Railway
Utah District


Re: Admin: End of Perceptions of distance

SUVCWORR@...
 

In a message dated 1/26/2006 2:14:39 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
brockm@brevard.net writes:

And, now without further ado...the thread about where the West begins [ and
I always thought it was Fort Worth...at least that's what was said in that
movie and would a movie lie? ] is officially terminated...along with the
geography lessons. Frt cars, guys, frt cars.



Sorry, Mike. I posted as I was reading through my e-mails and before I read
this one.

Rich Orr

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