Date   

Re: Above Roof Brake Wheels? - Revisited

Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

Jim Betz wrote:
<snip>
Does anyone know the answer to any of the following:

1) When were the last runs of new cars built with above roof
brake wheels? (I'm guessing late 30's.)
Power hand brakes were required on all new freight cars built on or
after January 1, 1937. Power hand brake does not necessarily mean
vertical wheel hand brake (correct terminology is vertical WHEEL or
horizontal WHEEL hand brake) because lever hand brakes and horizontal
wheel power hand brakes were contemplated but not yet approved in
1937. Mostly, however, power hand brake meant vertical wheel hand
brake.

2) When was the brake wheel on the end of the car "invented".
Ie. when did it become common practice to use this installation
on entire runs of cars? Again I'm talking box, stock, and
reefer. (I'm guessing early to mid-30's.)
The Ajax hand brake was the first of what we generally visualize when
speaking of a vertical wheel hand brake. The very first production
Ajax vertical wheel hand brake was the 13039 produced from May 1926 to
July 1926.


3) When was the one-piece steel car end introduced?
- Jim in San
Jose
P.S. My apologies for the off list content - I didn't see any good
way to avoid it and cover the topic correctly/adequately.
See my responses to questions 1 and 2 above. Question 3 is outside my
area of expertise.

Gene Green


Re: Improved Hopper Car Steps - Reference Dean Payne's Post

rgs4550 <rgsfan@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Dean Payne" <deanpayne@n...> wrote:

Don,
I found out that Des Plaines Hobbies makes part No. DPH 2001, which
is a side-attached double rung stirrup... I mean "sill" step. I
found a photo in the December 2004 RMC, in a photo of Culotta's
Rutland stock car. I was looking for just the same thing for my
Funaro GN truss rod box car, but since Des Plaines had no photo or
detailed description, I didn't take the chance and order a set.
BTW, Ted refers to that Funaro kit as "...one of the most enjoyable
kits I have ever built." I would have expected that more from a
Sunshine or Westerfield kit, and this doesn't even appear to be a
more recent F&C kit. He did do some clever things to improve the
model, perhaps that provided the enjoyment as much as anything. It
is indeed an interesting car, being 36' long and using wood side
braces. (Built in 1903, running to the early 50's.)
Lacking the Des Plaines steps, I was able to cobble some long bottom
mount double-rung sill steps by finding double-rung offset steps -
they were molded in yellow, I think they were designed for a modern
covered hopper or something. Anyway, I cut off the offset leg and
had a nice bottom mount double-rung! I also used those for a gondola.
Below left is original, right has the diagonal leg cut off.

&#92;|_| |_|
|_| |_|

Dean Payne
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "rgs4550" <rgsfan@i...> wrote:

The referent post spoke of upgrading hopper cars. When I set
about
doing this one big problem is decent replacement steps. I've been
bugging Don Tichy about providing a better step casting, Attached
is
copy of my note to Tichy. Would other members of the list be
interested in such a part If so would you drop a note to Tichy.
My
original note to Tichy was the following:

Subject: Hopper Car Stirrup Steps
"Hi Don, When I stopped by your booth (At the Ann Arbor, Mich
Train
Show) on Saturday I briefly chatted with you about doing a two
rung
side attached hopper car stirrup step. You said for me to send you
information about the item. During our conversation I mentioned an
article in Mainline Modeler. There is a four part article in the
August thru November 1987 issues which includes dimensions of the
steps. The real documentation of the step and its frequency of use
is
in the five part review of Twin Offset Side Hoppers in Ed Hawkins
Railway Prototype Cyclopedias; Issues 1,2, 4 8 and 9. These
articles,
I think, contain photos of most twin offset hoppers made during
their
era. Of the 119 photos in the series which show a side or
quartering
side view, 92 or 77% show the type of step I mentioned being
used. I
for one would love to see one produced. I don't believe DA has one
either so if there is still any market for detailing bits and
pieces I
think this one would be a winner. Regards, Don Smith 734-676-
3928"


Thanks, Don Smith
Hi Dean. The DesPlaines step is not what I'm talking about! If you'll
look at photos of prototype hoppers in either of the two sources I
mentioned you'll see that the double rung step both angles from the
middle rung to the point of side attachment while the outside side rail
of the step is attached to the underside of the car. Regards, Don
Smith


Re: Above Roof Brake Wheels? - Revisited

Patrick Wider <pwider@...>
 

Railway Prototype Cyclopedia, Volume 10 (still in stock), has a 59 page article on freight
car hand brakes that attempts to answer many of these questions and dispels some of
these conclusions. It cites 31 sources of information. Even at that, the article only
scratched the surface of this subject but I figured at some point it was time to "stick a fork
in it" and call it done. Caution: counting "heads" in photos may lead to inaccurate or
imprecise conclusions.

Gene Green, online freight car handbrake expert, may wish to add to this subject where
my article ended.

Pat Wider

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Jim Betz <jimbetz@j...> wrote:

Hi guys,
Thanks for all of the good info on this topic!

Before I go on I'd like to add something to this discussion that was
in my mind when I posted the prior time ... but that I did not say at
that time. Namely that I was thinking about box cars, stock cars, and
reefers ... and not about other car types ... and I still am interested
in only those car types (with respect to this topic).

OK, so I just went thru over 10 books covering one RR from its earliest
years until its demise (by merger in 1970) and here is what I observed in
an hour of scanning pictures and using an opti-visor on the important
ones:

Prior to 1930 - essentially 'all' cars had horizontal brake wheels.
Noteable exceptions were all ore cars and most other
open hoppers. Gondolas seemed to have some of both.
1930's - very common to pre-dominately all cars had them - but changing
fairly rapidly during the late 30's. (Perhaps this is the
influence of the AAR designs?)
1940's - still quite common, especially during and pre-WWII - but also
lots of cars and even entire cuts of cars with only vertical
brake wheels. Furthermore, I found several clear pictures of
entire trains (as well as could be determined) with brake wheels
only on the ends of the cars - in post-WWII 40's. And pics of
yards in the late 40's in which I couldn't find an example of
any above roof brake wheels. (I'm not saying that there weren't
any horizontal brake wheels in that yard on that day nor even
in the picture ... I'm saying that all of the cars I could
say "for sure" ... had vertical brake wheels on that day.)
1950's - still see a few, but clearly most of the cars have wheel on
the end of the car. I would call the frequency of horizontal
brake wheels in this period "uncommon".
1960's - first half of decade you still see a few. By the second half
of the decade horizontal brake wheels are definitely becoming
"rare birds".
1970's - very, very rare, some above roof brake wheels on cars converted
to MOW service but even they are rare and the photo of them
shows that they are not being used frequently if at all.

Other observations:

1) Stock cars seem to have been one of the last bastions of the above
roof brake wheel. Having said that there were lots of stock cars
with vertical brake wheels and they certainly were the 'norm' as
early as the mid-50's.
2) Some ice reefers had above roof brake wheels very late. As near as
I can tell none of the mech reefers ever had them (makes sense).
It is possible that some ice reefers lasted to the very end of
ice operations with horizontal brake wheels.
3) When looking at box cars - if the car was of "all steel" construction
then it does not have a brake wheel above the roof line. If it has
one-piece steel ends then it does not have a brake wheel above the
roof line. If it has a two-piece steel end then it might have a
brake wheel above the roof line ... but not often.
4) If the car is of "all wood" construction it usually/always has a
brake wheel above the roof line ... unless it was rebuilt ... or if
it has outside bracing then it often started life with an above
roof wheel and ended its life with a brake wheel mounted on the
end of the car. If the car has a wood end it almost always has
a horizontal brake wheel ... but even then not always.
5) I don't think I saw even one example of a 50' car with a brake wheel
above the roof line.

Does anyone know the answer to any of the following:

1) When were the last runs of new cars built with above roof
brake wheels? (I'm guessing late 30's.)
2) When was the brake wheel on the end of the car "invented".
Ie. when did it become common practice to use this installation
on entire runs of cars? Again I'm talking box, stock, and
reefer. (I'm guessing early to mid-30's.)
3) When was the one-piece steel car end introduced?
- Jim in San Jose
P.S. My apologies for the off list content - I didn't see any good
way to avoid it and cover the topic correctly/adequately.


Re: Fw: Dalman trucks and insulated tank cars

Jerry <jrs060@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@c...> wrote:


Jerry, what builders photo?? You mean in Richard's article?
(I guess I'd better find a copy.) Is there a detail part in HO
to represent the unloading pipe?

Tim O'Connor
Sinclair aficionado


Also the SDRX is a specification IV car and will require
the addition of the pressure unloading pipe on the dome,
that would take you all of 10 minutes to fix (it's showing
on the builders photo behind the safety valves).
Regards,
Jerry Stewart
Chicago,Ill.
Well Mr.Tim (Drive with care and Buy Sinclair) O'Connor
yes it's the one in the November MRJ article by Richard. I
think it's on page #54, but I do not have it in front of me
as it's in my locker at the tower right now.
Remember this group of Sinclair cars are specification IV
(4) cars for volatile liquids under low pressure. Not type
III (3) cars insulated to carry asphalt or tar. As a type
IV car it has a fitting to pressurize the tank (at low
pressure of about 20 PSI) to unload the car without having
to open the larger filling cover, this would be desirable
because you can get the commodity out without the nasty
explosive vapors escaping.
It's lucky that the builders photograph was take from the
safety valve end of the car, so you can see the pipe. It's
sticking up between the two safety valves, outboard of them
between the valves and the edge of the dome. It's not
much, just a pipe fitted with a fixture at the top to
attach an air hose coupling.
What I'm going to do is model it with a piece of brass
wire and a scrap soldered to the top, it's in a vulnerable
spot to be broken and you need some strength. Take you about
10 minutes to do the job, and no I have never seen anyone
make that part.
Many of the Sinclair tank cars were maintained by General
American, and this model has an EC station symbol for East
Chicago, Ind., and why not as the GATC tank car repair shop
was across the street from the Sinclair loading dock at the
refinery! The car replicates a 1948 shopping by GATC very
well, the conversion to AB brakes in an arrangement that was
typical of the way GATC did it, the replacement of the wood
placards boards with metal holders as they split from nail
and staples used to attach the paper placards, and
replacement of the old Carmer uncoupling levers with bent
rod as GATC did not repair them in kind if they needed work.
Now you and Mr. Brock can have a very accurate Sinclair
insulated tank with only a little work right out of the box.
O'h, I almost forgot you now owe me a beer at Naperville for
all this typing.

Regards,

Jerry Stewart
Chicago, Ill.


Re: Above Roof Brake Wheels? - Revisited

Roger Parry <uncleroger@...>
 

On the 50' car with vertical brake staff. What about the 50' GN auto boxs Westerfield produced ?
On Jan 27, 2006, at 2:08 AM, Jim Betz wrote:

Hi guys,
Thanks for all of the good info on this topic!

Before I go on I'd like to add something to this discussion that was
in my mind when I posted the prior time ... but that I did not say at
that time. Namely that I was thinking about box cars, stock cars, and
reefers ... and not about other car types ... and I still am interested
in only those car types (with respect to this topic).

OK, so I just went thru over 10 books covering one RR from its earliest
years until its demise (by merger in 1970) and here is what I observed in
an hour of scanning pictures and using an opti-visor on the important
ones:

Prior to 1930 - essentially 'all' cars had horizontal brake wheels.
Noteable exceptions were all ore cars and most other
open hoppers. Gondolas seemed to have some of both.
1930's - very common to pre-dominately all cars had them - but changing
fairly rapidly during the late 30's. (Perhaps this is the
influence of the AAR designs?)
1940's - still quite common, especially during and pre-WWII - but also
lots of cars and even entire cuts of cars with only vertical
brake wheels. Furthermore, I found several clear pictures of
entire trains (as well as could be determined) with brake wheels
only on the ends of the cars - in post-WWII 40's. And pics of
yards in the late 40's in which I couldn't find an example of
any above roof brake wheels. (I'm not saying that there weren't
any horizontal brake wheels in that yard on that day nor even
in the picture ... I'm saying that all of the cars I could
say "for sure" ... had vertical brake wheels on that day.)
1950's - still see a few, but clearly most of the cars have wheel on
the end of the car. I would call the frequency of horizontal
brake wheels in this period "uncommon".
1960's - first half of decade you still see a few. By the second half
of the decade horizontal brake wheels are definitely becoming
"rare birds".
1970's - very, very rare, some above roof brake wheels on cars converted
to MOW service but even they are rare and the photo of them
shows that they are not being used frequently if at all.

Other observations:

1) Stock cars seem to have been one of the last bastions of the above
roof brake wheel. Having said that there were lots of stock cars
with vertical brake wheels and they certainly were the 'norm' as
early as the mid-50's.
2) Some ice reefers had above roof brake wheels very late. As near as
I can tell none of the mech reefers ever had them (makes sense).
It is possible that some ice reefers lasted to the very end of
ice operations with horizontal brake wheels.
3) When looking at box cars - if the car was of "all steel" construction
then it does not have a brake wheel above the roof line. If it has
one-piece steel ends then it does not have a brake wheel above the
roof line. If it has a two-piece steel end then it might have a
brake wheel above the roof line ... but not often.
4) If the car is of "all wood" construction it usually/always has a
brake wheel above the roof line ... unless it was rebuilt ... or if
it has outside bracing then it often started life with an above
roof wheel and ended its life with a brake wheel mounted on the
end of the car. If the car has a wood end it almost always has
a horizontal brake wheel ... but even then not always.
5) I don't think I saw even one example of a 50' car with a brake wheel
above the roof line.

Does anyone know the answer to any of the following:

1) When were the last runs of new cars built with above roof
brake wheels? (I'm guessing late 30's.)
2) When was the brake wheel on the end of the car "invented".
Ie. when did it become common practice to use this installation
on entire runs of cars? Again I'm talking box, stock, and
reefer. (I'm guessing early to mid-30's.)
3) When was the one-piece steel car end introduced?
- Jim in San Jose
P.S. My apologies for the off list content - I didn't see any good
way to avoid it and cover the topic correctly/adequately.




Yahoo! Groups Links






Re: Covered Hoppers (Borax)

olin4812
 

One other item-
The NEB&W website has a nice photo of one of the PCB cars painted in
a billboard scheme in the private owner section. It's a grey car
with black ends and underbody advertizing one of their weed killing
Borax products.

Olin Dirks



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "olin4812" <olin4812@y...> wrote:

The Pacific Coast Borax Company, the former owner of the Tonopah
and
Tidewater Railroad, Later American Chemical & Potash, (Later Still
U.S. Borax after the scope of this list) had a small but growing
fleet of Pullman built NAHX 2003 cube covered hoppers to ship
Sodium
Borate and other Borax products from their Boron, CA plant. (I
would
welcome any information about any General American or other
additional cars.) The highest volume destination was their Pier A
plant in Long Beach. There is circumstantial evidence to suggest
that they also used ATSF marked cars, which probably would have
included 2893 cube PS-2's by the end of the '50's. These cars
however did not have "shelf type rungs" on their end ladders.
PCB/ACP also shipped bagged product in boxcars.



Your mention of volcanic material got me thinking
about
Boraxo products, and coarse sand paper. Are any listers familiar
with
the manufacture of said items; and can provide enlightenment?
Thinking
out loud.

Fred Freitas

GCRDS@a... wrote:






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


GATEWAY MRR CLUB OPEN HOUSE.

Bill Jones
 

Gateway Model Railroad Club in Brooklawn, New Jersey has an open house
this weekend Saturday the 28th and Sunday the 29th from10am until 4pm.
Address is 100 Browning Road, Brooklawn, NJ, 08030. Just off Route 42
to Atlantic City Expressway.

We have made the change over to 50's equipment this means steam and
early diesels. On an eastern, bridge line between the old Reading, Erie
and Pennsy in New Jersey. We operate with a Digitrax system over two
operating levels and a third for our staging.

In addition, I do experimental run troughs of SF and SP reefer block
trains. I just can't resist.

If you are in the area, you are more than welcome to visit.

Thanks
Bill Jones


Re: Covered Hoppers (Borax)

olin4812
 

The Pacific Coast Borax Company, the former owner of the Tonopah and
Tidewater Railroad, Later American Chemical & Potash, (Later Still
U.S. Borax after the scope of this list) had a small but growing
fleet of Pullman built NAHX 2003 cube covered hoppers to ship Sodium
Borate and other Borax products from their Boron, CA plant. (I would
welcome any information about any General American or other
additional cars.) The highest volume destination was their Pier A
plant in Long Beach. There is circumstantial evidence to suggest
that they also used ATSF marked cars, which probably would have
included 2893 cube PS-2's by the end of the '50's. These cars
however did not have "shelf type rungs" on their end ladders.
PCB/ACP also shipped bagged product in boxcars.



Your mention of volcanic material got me thinking about
Boraxo products, and coarse sand paper. Are any listers familiar
with
the manufacture of said items; and can provide enlightenment?
Thinking
out loud.

Fred Freitas

GCRDS@a... wrote:






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Sanborne Maps and LOC

Milepost 131 <mp131@...>
 

Unless you are in a real hurry... The LOC plans to get all of the maps
on-line in the near future. Also a lot of maps are scattered around the
country on microfilm in University Libraries and state libraries.

Gordon Andrews

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Anthony Thompson
Sent: Friday, January 27, 2006 12:52 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Sanborne Maps


David Smith wrote:
Alright, since I'm going to be in DC in a week and might be able to
steal and hour or two - is that enough time to get to the Sanborn maps
at LOC and if so, how does one do that?
Never having done it, I don't know. But you could start with
their website at www.loc.gov

Tony Thompson
Director, SP Historical & Technical Society
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705
(510) 540-6538 thompsonmarytony@sbcglobal.net




SPONSORED LINKS
Train travel
<http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Train+travel&w1=Train+travel&w2=Freight
+car&w3=Canada+train+travel&w4=Train+travel+in+italy&w5=North+american&c=5&s
=107&.sig=ThjIzsvLGHyuil6dLaLY-g> Freight car
<http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Freight+car&w1=Train+travel&w2=Freight+
car&w3=Canada+train+travel&w4=Train+travel+in+italy&w5=North+american&c=5&s=
107&.sig=6EOh7hT6stDpWVhIVo3DSg> Canada train travel
<http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Canada+train+travel&w1=Train+travel&w2=
Freight+car&w3=Canada+train+travel&w4=Train+travel+in+italy&w5=North+america
n&c=5&s=107&.sig=n3C1Pv8RSaJFaT7JW4u8_A>
Train travel in italy
<http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Train+travel+in+italy&w1=Train+travel&w
2=Freight+car&w3=Canada+train+travel&w4=Train+travel+in+italy&w5=North+ameri
can&c=5&s=107&.sig=XAiaJ8zeKYmEvLL4zQxTOQ> North american
<http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=North+american&w1=Train+travel&w2=Freig
ht+car&w3=Canada+train+travel&w4=Train+travel+in+italy&w5=North+american&c=5
&s=107&.sig=hg2t3ACQguvSVbdQvlSCLg>

_____

YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS



* Visit your group "STMFC <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC> " on
the web.

* To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:STMFC-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>

* Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service
<http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> .


_____


--
No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.375 / Virus Database: 267.14.23/242 - Release Date: 1/26/2006



--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.375 / Virus Database: 267.14.23/242 - Release Date: 1/26/2006


Re: Sanborne Maps

jaley <jaley@...>
 

On Jan 27, 11:22am, David Smith wrote:
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Sanborne Maps
Alright, since I'm going to be in DC in a week and might be able to
steal and hour or two - is that enough time to get to the Sanborn maps
at LOC and if so, how does one do that?

Thanks,
Dave

Dave,

It has been many years since I accessed the Sanborn Map collection
at the LOC. There was a "Map Room" or "Map Collection" in one of the LOC
buildings -- not the fancy one behind the capitol, but the ugly
"government"-looking one across the street to the south.

It didn't take very long to get in (pre- 9/11). You do the
security thing, then you have to sign up as a researcher, which only takes
a few minutes. Then you put all your stuff in a locker (bring coins), and
in you go. Submit a request for the maps you want (research it first on
the LOC website -- there's also a book that documents the Sanborn holdings
at the LOC, so it might be a good place to start).
Access is like most research libraries: you give your request to
the staff, and they go into the stacks and come back with your book /
maps.

The books are HUGE -- like 3' square, and are in COLOR. I also
had some luck with the microfilms, which are easier to deal with, and easy
to print from (but are only b&w).

BTW, many local libraries have the Sanborn Maps for their state
available on CDROM (.pdf files). I have also successfully accessed the
microfilm via Inter-Library Loan.

Good luck!

-Jeff

P.S. It is best to double-check all that I have said, since items may have
been moved to other buildings, and policies may have changed over the
years.



--
Jeff Aley jaley@pcocd2.intel.com
DPG Chipsets Product Engineering
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533


Re: Sanborne Maps

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

David Smith wrote:
Alright, since I'm going to be in DC in a week and might be able to
steal and hour or two - is that enough time to get to the Sanborn maps
at LOC and if so, how does one do that?
Never having done it, I don't know. But you could start with their website at www.loc.gov

Tony Thompson
Director, SP Historical & Technical Society
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705
(510) 540-6538 thompsonmarytony@sbcglobal.net


Re: Ulrich Models postponed indefinitely.

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Peter J. McClosky wrote:
To quote the Urlich website;

( http://www.ulrichmodels.com/ulrich.asp )

"Ulrich GS Gondola postponed indefinitely. Hopefully its still in the
future."

Does anyone know why?
I was looking forward to it!
From I've been told, I think the person who owns all the Ulrich stuff is financially limited, and pretty much used the available capital bringing back the Ulrich highway trucks. He told me a couple of years ago that the gondola molds were okay for use with styrene, which was his intent. He was also considering some "upgrades" and perhaps those are the problem.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: What is the weakest part of your fleet?

Bruce Smith
 

On Jan 26, 2006, at 11:02 PM, Dean Payne wrote:

For me, the weekest area is my hopper fleet, and I make a bet this will
sound familiar to some. I have unimproved USRA hoppers by Accurail,
without Andrews trucks or any brass wire or other detailing. I have
Bowser H21 hoppers with factory paint that is too brown...
Dean et al,

WRT those H21s, we're just about ready to start that project over on PRRPro (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PRRPro/). Gimme a couple of weeks to finish all the pipes on my I1s 2-10-0 <G>. We'll be doing multiple scales and multiple models, but the Bowser is sure to be a focus. In particular, I want to look at way to rapidly improve a large fleet of these.


Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Re: What is the weakest part of your fleet?

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

bunch of Tichy tank cars I will use them with minimal
modifications. They may not be right but are still one of the best
engineered kits<

I also have Tichy tanks and also will use them. They are the best
engineered tank kit on the market.

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Ulrich Models Ulrich Models postponed indefinitely.

Peter J. McClosky <pmcclosky@...>
 

To quote the Urlich website;

( http://www.ulrichmodels.com/ulrich.asp )

"Ulrich GS Gondola postponed indefinitely. Hopefully its still in the future."

Does anyone know why?

I was looking forward to it!

Peter J. McClosky

--
--
Peter J. McClosky
Formerly of Los Angeles, CA
Now Living in Eugene, Oregon
http://home.earthlink.net/~pmcclosky
pmcclosky@comcast.net


Re: What is the weakest part of your fleet?

jerryglow2
 

Since I have a bunch of Tichy tank cars I will use them with minimal
modifications. They may not be right but are still one of the best
engineered kits and look good other than the discrepancies. I justify
it because they're mostly thru traffic with no online users (on the
area I model).

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Dean Payne" <deanpayne@n...> wrote:

C'mon guys, fess up. ?

Dean Payne


Re: weakest part of your fleet

jerryglow2
 

To harvest rivets I assume? <g>

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "gsb157" <sgaab@p...> wrote:
I even have some Athearn 40' box cars & hi-cubes (don't ask).

Greg Bartek


Re: Covered Hoppers

David Smith <dsmith@...>
 

There is information on the RPI web site about Barton Mines - one of the
principal domestic producers of garnet for abrasives - in North Creek
NY. The garnet was shipped on D&H, apparently in box cars, to end
users.

Borax is derived from minerals formed by evaporation and mined out of
some western dry lake beds with the right chemistry (high sodium and
boron). I could tell you more about the mineralogy, but that doesn't
have anything to do with getting it into a... freight car, as Mike would
probably remind us ;-)

Dave Smith




Guys,

Your mention of volcanic material got me thinking about
Boraxo products, and coarse sand paper. Are any listers familiar with
the manufacture of said items; and can provide enlightenment? Thinking
out loud.

Fred Freitas

GCRDS@aol.com wrote:


Re: What is the weakest part of your fleet?

Storey Lindsay
 

Dean,

Having collected HO freight cars since the late '60s, I have a few of the "older" cars in my fleet of 772. In fact, 56% are by Athearn, Model Die Casting, Train-Miniature, AHM, Varney, Ulrich, etc. The Red Caboose, Intermountain, Branchline, etc. cars make up 24%, with resin 14% and brass 6%. I have a lot of work in front of me to upgrade my older cars to compete with current offerings.

Storey Lindsay
Celje, Slovenia

Dean Payne wrote:

Am I alone, does everyone else have nothing but Proto, Branchline,
Intermountain and resin?


Re: weakest part of your fleet

Greg Bartek
 

In this group, I'm afraid I'll be bringing up the rear <LOL>. I can't
seem to part with my Accurail USRA hoppers, nothing wrong with them :)
and yes, I even have some Athearn 40' box cars & hi-cubes (don't ask).

Greg Bartek

136721 - 136740 of 187390