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wanted: APM Flxible Cl;ipper Bus Model

PBowers <waiting@...>
 

I know bus is a four letter word on a lot of layouts but I'm looking for a American Precision Model HO Flxible Clipper bus for a railcar load. This is the one with the small side windows. A photo of this bus can be found at: <http://www.clic.net/~jacmatte/busfan/models_list/apm39001-3.jpg> APM also had a transit bus and the newer Flxible Sceniccruiser which had wide side windows.

Peter Bowers


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sheets of contact cement

ed_mines
 

About 25 years ago I laminated optical image disks with a contact
adhesive. The adhesive came between 2 sheets of paper which were die
cut.

We'd peel the paper off one side, apply the adhesive patch, burnish
it and then peel off the second piece of paper and apply the second
part of the disk. Burnishing funished the job.

This would be ideal for attaching etched metal roofwalks.

Did you know that Goo can be activated with heat after it dries?
Check out old Walthers catalogs. Once it's on the plastic roof walk
supports
I let it dry, positioned the etched roof walk in place and then
heated the roof walk with a pencil solder iron.

I'll have to find out about Barge cement. A few years ago someone on
this list recommend Pliobond. After a while i couldn't get the jar
open and something fell to the bottom.

Ed


Re: IM R-40-19's

Terry Link <trlink@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "jaley" <jaley@pcocd2.intel.com>

When did IM start assembling R-40-19's? All I can find on their
website is the R-30-18 (along w/ the R-40-23, R-40-10, and R-40-25).

Item 47410 is the R-40-19 though it's listed under Pacific Freight Enterprises R-30-18.
http://www.imrcmodels.com/distrib/pfe/html/47410.htm

Terry Link
Bramalea, Ontario, Canada
trlink@canadasouthern.com
www.canadasouthern.com


Re: IM R-40-19's

jaley <jaley@...>
 

On Feb 10, 7:19pm, David Ball wrote:
Subject: [STMFC] IM R-40-19's
Hi Guys

More PFE model questions. This time about the IM assembled R-40-19's


David Ball
-- End of excerpt from David Ball

David,

When did IM start assembling R-40-19's? All I can find on their
website is the R-30-18 (along w/ the R-40-23, R-40-10, and R-40-25).

Thanks,

-Jeff

--
Jeff Aley jaley@pcocd2.intel.com
DPG Chipsets Product Engineering
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533


Re: Carbide drill bits?

ljack70117@...
 

On Feb 11, 2006, at 10:53 AM, Jack Burgess wrote:

Larry wrote:
As a machinist I would never use one for any thing with a Rockwell of less
than 56 and never hand drill with one.
This is about carbide. HSS is always sharper than carbide so HSS will drill faster and better than carbide in your plastic, resin or what ever when drilling by hand.!!!!!!!!!

Part of the original question was about hand drilling with #61-80 bits. I
would disagree with a blanket statement about hand drilling with small
bits...I won't hand drill in steel and hand drilling in brass could take all
day but hand drilling plastic or resin is not a problem.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net


Re: Carbide drill bits?

Jack Burgess
 

Larry wrote:
As a machinist I would never use one for any thing with a Rockwell of less
than 56 and never hand drill with one.

Part of the original question was about hand drilling with #61-80 bits. I
would disagree with a blanket statement about hand drilling with small
bits...I won't hand drill in steel and hand drilling in brass could take all
day but hand drilling plastic or resin is not a problem.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Re: Carbide drill bits?

Don Worthy
 

Guys I just received 3 packs of the "e-bay" bits. I don't know what type steel they are or even if they'er steel at all!!!!!
I've tried them and they are some dull...they won't go through plastic. Two broke so quick...I didn't even get a hole started!!!!
They are Chinese that is the only markings or information marked on the boxes.

They aren't even worth the chip price!!!!
Don Worthy
Ivey, Ga.

ljack70117@adelphia.net wrote:

On Feb 11, 2006, at 9:05 AM, engnut2004 wrote:

Hi, all,

I'm mostly a listener but was wondering if anyone can comment on using
carbide drill bits in the #60 to #80 range. Are they too brittle?
Can they be used in hand-held chucks? I see sets of them at
attractive prices on e-bay but wonder if (at least in the small sizes
mentioned above) they are practical for model car building.

TIA,

George Pierson
Carbide drills are brittle and are not as sharp as HSS. Carbide will
not sharpen as sharp. Just the nature of carbide. You are wasting
your money because they cost more than HSS. AS a machinist I would
never use one for any thing with a Rockwell of less than 56 and never
hand drill with one. They should be run at high speed.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net





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Re: Carbide drill bits?

ljack70117@...
 

On Feb 11, 2006, at 9:05 AM, engnut2004 wrote:

Hi, all,

I'm mostly a listener but was wondering if anyone can comment on using
carbide drill bits in the #60 to #80 range. Are they too brittle?
Can they be used in hand-held chucks? I see sets of them at
attractive prices on e-bay but wonder if (at least in the small sizes
mentioned above) they are practical for model car building.

TIA,

George Pierson
Carbide drills are brittle and are not as sharp as HSS. Carbide will not sharpen as sharp. Just the nature of carbide. You are wasting your money because they cost more than HSS. AS a machinist I would never use one for any thing with a Rockwell of less than 56 and never hand drill with one. They should be run at high speed.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net


Carbide drill bits?

engnut2004 <gpierson@...>
 

Hi, all,

I'm mostly a listener but was wondering if anyone can comment on using
carbide drill bits in the #60 to #80 range. Are they too brittle?
Can they be used in hand-held chucks? I see sets of them at
attractive prices on e-bay but wonder if (at least in the small sizes
mentioned above) they are practical for model car building.

TIA,

George Pierson


Re: Super Glue as medical adhesive

Thomas Baker
 

About four years ago at the S gauge convention in Strongville, Ohio, a gentleman from Florida was touting his glue. One of his points was that his glue--and I cannot recall the brand name--was devloped by the Germans during World War II and used by Wehrmacht medics on the battlefield when sutures would take too long. The wounded Soldat could be temporarily "sown up" and then evacuated to a hospital where proper sutures could be made. It never entered my head though to try the stuff in the alleged medical capacity. Those who tried his product said that it worked very well for assembling plastic kits.

Tom

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Denny Anspach
Sent: Fri 2/10/2006 2:49 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Super Glue as medical adhesive

The AC glue used for medical purposes is NOT the same as what one can
purchase at the LHS or office supply. The biggest difference (and the
most important) is that the medical grade is sterile, and the
commercial grade is not- pretty important. I would be very cautious
about using it in this regard.

Denny
--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento



Yahoo! Groups Links


AC&F customer lists - interpreting

Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@...>
 

I was reviewing the AC&F lists of customers from the St Louis Mercantile Library, and noticed a series of cars/lots sold to CC&F. Among these were two sets of Type 27 tank cars, lots 714 of 5 cars, and 889 of 10 cars.

So a couple of questions arise:
1) would AC&F selling to CC&F reflect CC&F actually placing an order for car production with AC&F in an AC&F plant? Or is this probably reflective of some customs duty/tax dodge by companies with cross border traffic?

2) if these are probably relfective of CC&F actually commissioning AC&F to build and send tank cars north, presumeably it was for resale in Canada. ie CC&F would not have maintained a rost of freight cars as a lessor would it?

3) Does anyone happen to have an idea who (after CC&F) purchased lots 714 and 889, the two lots of Type 27 cars?

4) anyone know of Canadian owners of Type 27 cars? (obvious InterMountain model being the key issue here!)

Thanks in advance,

Rob Kirkham


Re: Tim's contact glue advice

oliver
 

I would concur with Andy carlson. My experience has been similar. It
is not always necessary to coat both sides unless you have a large
surface area to work with.
Stefan Lerche'
Duncan, BC

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Andy Carlson <midcentury@...> wrote:



Tim,
Though almost all contact cement manufacturers
(probably all, actually)direct the user to coat both
pieces to be joined, I frequently deviate from that
advice. I have had really good results in attaching
etched running boards to (plastic) roofs by simply
applying micro-amounts of Barge's cement solely to the
runningboard saddles placing the car up-side down
righted with a machinists square. The weight of the
car kept the runningboard in contact throughout the
curing process, and the glass table-top kept the
running board very straight. Bonds of 8 years ago are
still holding up quite well.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA
--- Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Ed

This should be tattooed on the inside of model
railroader's
eyelids:

GOO is a CONTACT CEMENT. It must be applied to
both parts
to be joined and allowed to DRY (tacky) first,
before the
parts are joined.


KCS 15500-155599

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

Greg's handout from Cocoa Beach says "freight car Red" for the body color.
Can anyone supply a good match for this car in Pollyscale, or other
waterbase paint.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Tim's contact glue advice

Andy Carlson
 

Tim,
Though almost all contact cement manufacturers
(probably all, actually)direct the user to coat both
pieces to be joined, I frequently deviate from that
advice. I have had really good results in attaching
etched running boards to (plastic) roofs by simply
applying micro-amounts of Barge's cement solely to the
runningboard saddles placing the car up-side down
righted with a machinists square. The weight of the
car kept the runningboard in contact throughout the
curing process, and the glass table-top kept the
running board very straight. Bonds of 8 years ago are
still holding up quite well.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA
--- Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:


Ed

This should be tattooed on the inside of model
railroader's
eyelids:

GOO is a CONTACT CEMENT. It must be applied to
both parts
to be joined and allowed to DRY (tacky) first,
before the
parts are joined.


Re: BREX beginnings

proto48er
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Rupert and Maureen" <gamlenz@...> wrote:

Still on the subject of BREX, I'm compiling a full roster of CB&Q
reefers, including those that were leased to Burlington Refrigerator
Express Co. in June 1926.

I am aware of the intended number groups for the leased cars but
does anyone have a June 1926 ORER who can provide me with the actual
number groups that were listed for the new company.

Also, the first listing of the number of cars in each number group
was between November 1926 and May 1927. Does anyone have an ORER
between those dates who can assist with this.
Rupert - I have June, 1926 and March, 1927, ORER's. I think I still
have your email address in the computer. A.T. Kott


Re: Cyanopoxy

S. Busch <SCSBusch@...>
 

Max Robin asked:


Has anyone got an address/email/phone # for Mike Rose? I want to get some
additional cyanopoxy for a non-model railroad application.

Here is Mike's Web site:

www.mrhobby.com

(Mike Rose Hobbies)

- Steve Busch
Duncan, SC


Durkees Famous Food

lnnrr <lnnrr@...>
 

Hi Folks,
Could I please get suggestions as to where I might find images of
any DFFX tank cars? They would likely have handled vegetable oils and
such. Based in Louisville Ky. Had ARA type II, III, and IV cars.
I've tried Alta Vista and Google with no results except a history of
the reporting mark.
Thaks,
Charles Peck


Re: Cyanopoxy

Max Robin
 

Has anyone got an address/email/phone # for Mike Rose? I want to get some
additional cyanopoxy for a non-model railroad application.

Thanks,

Max
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Cheat River Engineering Inc.
23 Richwood Place / P. O. Box 289
Denville, NJ 07834 - 0289

voice 973-627-5895 (Home : 7:30AM - 10:30PM EST)
973-627-5460 (Business: 8:00AM - 10:30PM EST)
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Re: Gorilla Glue (was ACC)

Dave Pfeiffer
 

Will Gorilla Glue or other urethane glues bond to engineering plastic? Thanks.

Dave Pfeiffer


Re: moisture cure polyurethanes/Goo strings

Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

Years ago I built a nice interior for the MDC observation and glued it
into the car with Goo. The interior was almost 100% styrene and was
glued together with solvent type cement. Eventually the Goo caused
severe warping of both car body and interior. Since that time I have
not used Goo. And I haven't found any way to manage the "stringies."

Gene Green

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...> wrote:

The reason moisture curing polyurethanes expands is that they produce
carbon dioxide gas as a byproduct which often gets trapped as bubbles.

Someone mentioned they used Goo instead of ACC. I'm no fan of ACC -
parts popped off of kits (Qualitycraft kits) I built years ago.

How do you keep the Goo strings from getting all over everything?

Ed

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