Date   

Re: IM R-40-19's

Andy Carlson
 

Should'nt that be R-30-18, As far as I know, no one
makes a RTR R-40-19, though Terry Wegmann has
indicated a willingnes to tool the parts to make one
in HO scale, but it is too early to call them
"Incorrect"
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

--- cobrapsl@aol.com wrote:

Guys, Take note that all of the road numbers for the
Intermountain R-40-19's
are incorrect, except the first one in the series,
#62537. The re-build date
is wrong and the ladders should also be black, I
think as Tony Thompson pointed
out.

Paul Lyons
Laguna Niguel, CA


[Non-text portions of this message have been
removed]




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Re: Dullcote problem

mudhen@...
 

On 11 Feb 2006 at 19:45, Jared Harper wrote:

With the newly sprayed Dullcote dry the roof has a spotty appearance
at certain viewing angles. Does anyone have an idea as to the cause?
If you spray something that's a little more to the glossy side,
the spotty appearance will disappear.

Chris Zygmunt
Railshop Inc.


Re: IM R-40-19's

Paul Lyons
 

No Andy, Intermountain has done what they call "R-40-19 Refrigerator Car" and
it is carried as their product number 47410. It is Terry's R-30-18 kit with
an apex metal roofwalk and a little different paint scheme. A little different
paint and a metal roof walk is essentilly the only difference betweem the -18
and the -19, so I am not sure what Terry would be doing to "create" a new -19
kit. Anyway they butcher this run with errors just like they did all the -18
models except for the one run they got right.
Paul Lyons
Laguna NIguel, CA


Intersting photos on ebay

earlyrail
 

Check this out for some Sinclair tank cars and a NYC cars shops photo
(scan down to see these items)

<http://cgi.ebay.com/RAILROAD-TRAINS-C-1922-16x22-Photos-Collection-of-7_W0QQitemZ6604938387QQcategoryZ35975QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem>


ICC-103 vs. ICC-104 Tankcars for Gasoline

Bob Lucas
 

Several sources state that casinghead gasoline (liquid hydrocarbons
extracted from natural gas) had to be shipped only in class ICC-104
insulated tank cars during the steam era. Was this true for refined
gasoline or were standard ICC-103 general purpose (non-insulated) tank
cars used? Bob Lucas


Re: Dullcote problem

Andy Carlson
 

If you were using rattle can Dullcoat, then I think I
know the problem. I have given up on the aerosol
version of Dullcoat because it was always coming out
blotched. Air brushing is the best way to apply
Dullcoat.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

--- Jared Harper <harper-brown@juno.com> wrote:
I then

sprayed the roof with Dullcote as I had other
portions of the model.
With the newly sprayed Dullcote dry the roof has a
spotty appearance
at certain viewing angles. Does anyone have an idea
as to the cause?


Re: Dullcote problem

armprem
 

Jared,It is a nice model.Your problem was probably caused by moisture.It
has happened to me a few times.Hope this helps.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jared Harper" <harper-brown@juno.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, February 11, 2006 2:45 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Dullcote problem


This is not a freight car question so perhaps someone could answer me
off list. I completed the Eskridge grain elevator that some of you saw
at Cocoa Beach, but decided a portion of the roof needed more
weathering. I applied more artist's oils and let them dry. I then
sprayed the roof with Dullcote as I had other portions of the model.
With the newly sprayed Dullcote dry the roof has a spotty appearance
at certain viewing angles. Does anyone have an idea as to the cause?

Jared Harper
Athens, GA






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Dullcote problem

Jared Harper <harper-brown@...>
 

This is not a freight car question so perhaps someone could answer me
off list. I completed the Eskridge grain elevator that some of you saw
at Cocoa Beach, but decided a portion of the roof needed more
weathering. I applied more artist's oils and let them dry. I then
sprayed the roof with Dullcote as I had other portions of the model.
With the newly sprayed Dullcote dry the roof has a spotty appearance
at certain viewing angles. Does anyone have an idea as to the cause?

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Mike Rose Re: Cyanopoxy

Ned Carey <nedspam@...>
 

Has anyone got an address/email/phone # for Mike Rose?
Max,

508-996-9728
miker@mrhobby.com

Found it in google.

Ned


Re: Carbide drill bits?

Michael Watnoski
 

Greetings,

If these are the printed circuit board drills with 1/8" shafts,
they will snap if used in any hand tool. A lot of these are on
the market because they are too short for drilling a stack of
circuit boards after being sharpened numerous times.

Michael


engnut2004 wrote:


Hi, all,

I'm mostly a listener but was wondering if anyone can comment on using
carbide drill bits in the #60 to #80 range. Are they too brittle?
Can they be used in hand-held chucks? I see sets of them at
attractive prices on e-bay but wonder if (at least in the small sizes
mentioned above) they are practical for model car building.

TIA,

George Pierson


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Re: IM R-40-19's

Paul Lyons
 

Guys, Take note that all of the road numbers for the Intermountain R-40-19's
are incorrect, except the first one in the series, #62537. The re-build date
is wrong and the ladders should also be black, I think as Tony Thompson pointed
out.

Paul Lyons
Laguna Niguel, CA


wanted: APM Flxible Cl;ipper Bus Model

PBowers <waiting@...>
 

I know bus is a four letter word on a lot of layouts but I'm looking for a American Precision Model HO Flxible Clipper bus for a railcar load. This is the one with the small side windows. A photo of this bus can be found at: <http://www.clic.net/~jacmatte/busfan/models_list/apm39001-3.jpg> APM also had a transit bus and the newer Flxible Sceniccruiser which had wide side windows.

Peter Bowers


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sheets of contact cement

ed_mines
 

About 25 years ago I laminated optical image disks with a contact
adhesive. The adhesive came between 2 sheets of paper which were die
cut.

We'd peel the paper off one side, apply the adhesive patch, burnish
it and then peel off the second piece of paper and apply the second
part of the disk. Burnishing funished the job.

This would be ideal for attaching etched metal roofwalks.

Did you know that Goo can be activated with heat after it dries?
Check out old Walthers catalogs. Once it's on the plastic roof walk
supports
I let it dry, positioned the etched roof walk in place and then
heated the roof walk with a pencil solder iron.

I'll have to find out about Barge cement. A few years ago someone on
this list recommend Pliobond. After a while i couldn't get the jar
open and something fell to the bottom.

Ed


Re: IM R-40-19's

Terry Link <trlink@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "jaley" <jaley@pcocd2.intel.com>

When did IM start assembling R-40-19's? All I can find on their
website is the R-30-18 (along w/ the R-40-23, R-40-10, and R-40-25).

Item 47410 is the R-40-19 though it's listed under Pacific Freight Enterprises R-30-18.
http://www.imrcmodels.com/distrib/pfe/html/47410.htm

Terry Link
Bramalea, Ontario, Canada
trlink@canadasouthern.com
www.canadasouthern.com


Re: IM R-40-19's

jaley <jaley@...>
 

On Feb 10, 7:19pm, David Ball wrote:
Subject: [STMFC] IM R-40-19's
Hi Guys

More PFE model questions. This time about the IM assembled R-40-19's


David Ball
-- End of excerpt from David Ball

David,

When did IM start assembling R-40-19's? All I can find on their
website is the R-30-18 (along w/ the R-40-23, R-40-10, and R-40-25).

Thanks,

-Jeff

--
Jeff Aley jaley@pcocd2.intel.com
DPG Chipsets Product Engineering
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533


Re: Carbide drill bits?

ljack70117@...
 

On Feb 11, 2006, at 10:53 AM, Jack Burgess wrote:

Larry wrote:
As a machinist I would never use one for any thing with a Rockwell of less
than 56 and never hand drill with one.
This is about carbide. HSS is always sharper than carbide so HSS will drill faster and better than carbide in your plastic, resin or what ever when drilling by hand.!!!!!!!!!

Part of the original question was about hand drilling with #61-80 bits. I
would disagree with a blanket statement about hand drilling with small
bits...I won't hand drill in steel and hand drilling in brass could take all
day but hand drilling plastic or resin is not a problem.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net


Re: Carbide drill bits?

Jack Burgess
 

Larry wrote:
As a machinist I would never use one for any thing with a Rockwell of less
than 56 and never hand drill with one.

Part of the original question was about hand drilling with #61-80 bits. I
would disagree with a blanket statement about hand drilling with small
bits...I won't hand drill in steel and hand drilling in brass could take all
day but hand drilling plastic or resin is not a problem.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Re: Carbide drill bits?

Don Worthy
 

Guys I just received 3 packs of the "e-bay" bits. I don't know what type steel they are or even if they'er steel at all!!!!!
I've tried them and they are some dull...they won't go through plastic. Two broke so quick...I didn't even get a hole started!!!!
They are Chinese that is the only markings or information marked on the boxes.

They aren't even worth the chip price!!!!
Don Worthy
Ivey, Ga.

ljack70117@adelphia.net wrote:

On Feb 11, 2006, at 9:05 AM, engnut2004 wrote:

Hi, all,

I'm mostly a listener but was wondering if anyone can comment on using
carbide drill bits in the #60 to #80 range. Are they too brittle?
Can they be used in hand-held chucks? I see sets of them at
attractive prices on e-bay but wonder if (at least in the small sizes
mentioned above) they are practical for model car building.

TIA,

George Pierson
Carbide drills are brittle and are not as sharp as HSS. Carbide will
not sharpen as sharp. Just the nature of carbide. You are wasting
your money because they cost more than HSS. AS a machinist I would
never use one for any thing with a Rockwell of less than 56 and never
hand drill with one. They should be run at high speed.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net





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Re: Carbide drill bits?

ljack70117@...
 

On Feb 11, 2006, at 9:05 AM, engnut2004 wrote:

Hi, all,

I'm mostly a listener but was wondering if anyone can comment on using
carbide drill bits in the #60 to #80 range. Are they too brittle?
Can they be used in hand-held chucks? I see sets of them at
attractive prices on e-bay but wonder if (at least in the small sizes
mentioned above) they are practical for model car building.

TIA,

George Pierson
Carbide drills are brittle and are not as sharp as HSS. Carbide will not sharpen as sharp. Just the nature of carbide. You are wasting your money because they cost more than HSS. AS a machinist I would never use one for any thing with a Rockwell of less than 56 and never hand drill with one. They should be run at high speed.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net


Carbide drill bits?

engnut2004 <gpierson@...>
 

Hi, all,

I'm mostly a listener but was wondering if anyone can comment on using
carbide drill bits in the #60 to #80 range. Are they too brittle?
Can they be used in hand-held chucks? I see sets of them at
attractive prices on e-bay but wonder if (at least in the small sizes
mentioned above) they are practical for model car building.

TIA,

George Pierson

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