Date   

Re: New Kadee car

Lars Svanevik <svanevil@...>
 

Just because you are paranoid doesn't mean that they are not out to get
you.

Lars Svanevik

________________________________

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Anthony Thompson
Sent: Tuesday, March 28, 2006 11:03 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] New Kadee car


Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
Looking at the book more last night, I realized that the ERIE fan
would probably get screwed again,
since it used those strange Chicago? ends.
So, Schuyler, the paranoids are out to get you again?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history



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Re: Wikis

mjmcguirk@...
 


From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
no one has stepped forward
to create, organize and maintain one--a truly big job, as I know from
having just HELPED with one on another list--and perhaps the same could
arise with a STMFC Wiki. Anyone want to give it a try?


I nominate Dave Nelson to head this project up since he apparently has the interest and enthusiasm to see it through.

I also nominate Tim Gilbert to help him.

And, so it doesn't seem that I'll passing the buck (too much) I'll be happy to include any and information needed for the Central Vermont listing. I nominate Tony Thompson to handle the SP and Richard for the ATSF . . . wow, this is a easier than I thought it would be . . .

Marty McGuirk -- enjoying the sight of the nation's capital from my office across the river . . . with the windows open and bright sunlight streaming in . . .


Re: Accuracy of paint schemes...

Bill Schneider <branchline@...>
 

Scott Pitzer quipped:

Remember when the introduction of the Branchline 50' box car kits was stalled... a long time? And I griped (I must have
been in an especially gripy mood) because Ed Hawkins' related articles for RMJ were getting WAY ahead of the kits?
So did I Scott, though I suspect for somewhat different reasons... ;>)

Bill Schneider


Re: New Kadee car

Tim O'Connor
 

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
Looking at the book more last night, I realized that the ERIE fan
would probably get screwed again,
So, Schuyler, the paranoids are out to get you again?
Tony Thompson
Tony, he didn't say EERIE, he said ERIE.


Re: Accuracy of paint schemes...

Bill Schneider <branchline@...>
 

If we're talking about the "average" consumer it may be slightly less! OTOH, if the retainer is high enough I might consider quiting the day job and signing on as a consultant.... :>)

Bill Schneider


No, no Tony, that's not how it's gonna work. You get 2 cents for
every freight car sold, which is the value that average consumer
attaches to your opinion! :-)

Tim O'Connor


Re: New Kadee car

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Lars Svanevik wrote:
Just because you are paranoid doesn't mean that they are not out to get
you.
Um, yes, Lars, I too have read "Catch 22."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Code 88 wheels?

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Dennis Storzek wrote:
I'm sure you're correct, but as I explained the oher day, not only
doesn't it make any difference, it actually works to our advantage.
However, since these are not Code 88 wheels as specified in NMRA
RP-25, how about we just call them semi-scale wheels from now on?
Probably you mean "semi-code" wheels? Anything even close to RP-25 is a HUGE flange compared to scale.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Code 88 wheels?

Dennis Storzek <dstorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:


As to the depth of the flange, I can put my micrometer on the wheel's
diameter including the flange fairly reliably. When the readings
were the
same, I was lead to suspect that the manufacturing process was
merely to
reduce the tread size on a Code 110 wheel...which, apparently, is what
happened...at least in two cases.

Mike Brock
I'm sure you're correct, but as I explained the oher day, not only
doesn't it make any difference, it actually works to our advantage.
However, since these are not Code 88 wheels as specified in NMRA
RP-25, how about we just call them semi-scale wheels from now on?

Dennis Storzek


Re: New Kadee car

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
Looking at the book more last night, I realized that the ERIE fan would probably get screwed again,
since it used those strange Chicago? ends.
So, Schuyler, the paranoids are out to get you again?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: New Kadee car

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Looking at the book more last night, I realized that the ERIE fan would probably get screwed again,
since it used those strange Chicago? ends.

SGL

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On
Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Tuesday, March 28, 2006 11:07 AM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] New Kadee car


Schuyler wrote

eight variations is economical for a PS1, but not for an ARA 1932?
How so?

Because each of the 8 variations of the PS-1 has 10 to 50
possible paint schemes, and many different owners. Can you
say that about the
1932 ARA box? From Ted's tally it looks like there were 20
owners of the 1932 box cars, covering different roofs (6!),
ends (6!), interior heights (3), underframes (Duryea or
conventional), and doors.

Tim O'Connor




Yahoo! Groups Links







Re: Wikis

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Dave Nelson wrote:
Ok, here's what I was thinking . . .

Is it do-able? Would it be worthwhile? Would it be excessively burdonsome
to create and edit? I dunno.
I think this is a pretty practical break-down of what we would want. Whether it's "burdensome" or not is hard to say. The reason we don't have a FAQ file for this list is that no one has stepped forward to create, organize and maintain one--a truly big job, as I know from having just HELPED with one on another list--and perhaps the same could arise with a STMFC Wiki. Anyone want to give it a try?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Accuracy of paint schemes...

Tim O'Connor
 

No, no Tony, that's not how it's gonna work. You get 2 cents for
every freight car sold, which is the value that average consumer
attaches to your opinion! :-)

Tim O'Connor

Ted Culotta wrote:
How much does this committee pay? I could always use some extra
spending cash. Maybe they could sequester us in a hotel in a new
location each month for a few days for us to review all of these
schemes. I would expect a generous per diem, including an on call
sommelier, to help with all of the stress of evaluating these models.
Now we are talking! Sign me up! Richard would agree too,
especially the part about the sommelier, but won't be replying as he is
on the highway right now.

Tony Thompson


Re: Accuracy of paint schemes...

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Ted Culotta wrote:
How much does this committee pay? I could always use some extra
spending cash. Maybe they could sequester us in a hotel in a new
location each month for a few days for us to review all of these
schemes. I would expect a generous per diem, including an on call
sommelier, to help with all of the stress of evaluating these models.
Now we are talking! Sign me up! Richard would agree too, especially the part about the sommelier, but won't be replying as he is on the highway right now.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Wiki's ( was Accuracy of paint schemes...)

Dave Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

Anthony Thompson wrote:
Marty McGuirk wrote:
I know even less -- let me start with "What's a Wiki?????"
It could be defined as a possibly accurate--but usually well
supplied with inaccuracy--description of a topic, much like an
encyclopedia entry. The usual qualification to write one appears to
be that you know little and care less. Of course, if there were to be
STMFC version, we wouldn't be bound by those traditions. <g>

Yeah, true enough.

Ok, here's what I was thinking:

(1) There is expertise on this list, if not for actual contributions perhaps
active (or the occasional) review and feedback.

(2) A lot of web sites come and go and while some persons can preserve the
info by grabbing everything most folks don't bother... Simply trusting
that'll be there again next time they want it. The problem is any interest
/ means of any one individual who might be motivated to try something like
this solo can easily change -- note Ted's fine site... A gangbuster start
and little new for quite some time. The Wikipedia itself -- as an
independent agent with many contributors -- may be a solution to this. Or
not... I dunno.

(3) It is an encyclopedic amount of information... perhaps an encyclopedia
should be used to hold it.

(4) I have an ascii ORER that could serve as an initial frame upon which
add'l info can be hung. Something like:

--List of roads (from me, all hyperlinked to)
-- a date specific roster page of car series numbers & qty (from me,
series linked to)
-- date specific ORER data (from me)
-- linked to descriptions of each AAR code (from me).
-- linked to descriptions of each mark (e.g., car mark LA&SL vs.
owner UP; from me)
-- date specific ORER notes (if anyone wants to record them as I did
not)
-- an As-Built page (if anyone wants to contribute any of this) of
-- Arrangment drawing
-- As Built car series numbers
-- Builder info (perhaps hyperlinked to a Company overview)
-- Other as built data not in the ORER, such as roof, ends, truck,
brake, and brake wheel data (linked to the proper common description, not
individually typed for each entry).
-- Any paint and lettering info (linked to the proper common
description, not individually typed for each entry).
-- Fundamental design (e.g., AAR 1937 std; I may be able to kick
start this)
-- As Built photo (if anyone wants to contribute it)
-- Date specific roster summary (i.e., total number of XME cars of 50' 6";
length and 5012 cufeet on 80t trucks; from me)
-- Any other date specific roster summations (e.g., by frame -- S, SF, SU,
Wd, C; from me)
-- dated in-service photos (if anyone wants to contribute that)

The key concept of the above is a separation of date specific information,
such as the ORER quantities and summations -- which I already have -- from
the As Built information, much of which which I do not have but often comes
up in postings to this list. Such a seperation would allow anyone to
contribute the info they know or care about and to link the varying date
specific information together via the constant As Built info.

Now it might be this whole idea is a pipe dream... I really don't know one
way or the other, which is why I bring it up.

Is it do-able? Would it be worthwhile? Would it be excessively burdonsome
to create and edit? I dunno.

Any comments?

Dave Nelson


Re: Semi-Scale Wheel operation WAS: Re: Code 88 wheels?

mjmcguirk@...
 

Jim wrote (in part):
Finally - I'd also like some kind of operational data tossed into
the mix as well - stuff like which wheels have problems with which
existing turnouts, etc. From actual experience.


Okay, Jim, I'll bite. I experimented a bit with these wheels (InterMountain/Reboxx). I found they worked just fine on "Standard" HO track -- my layout at the time had 24" radius curves, no. 6 turnout (minimum) -- a combination of handlaid, Central Valley kits, Walthers, and Peco Code 100 (in staging). After a while the cars equipped with the wheelsets became completely "transparent to the user" -- a good sign as far as I'm concerned.

They are a little harder to get on the rails for some folks -- that really wasn't an issue, but it is something to keep in mind when setting rules about rerailing any cars that do hit the ties as some guest operators can get a little hamhanded at times.

The only "tell" I ever found was a noticeable "click" and a slight shimmy to the cars as they passed through the extremely generous guard rails and frogs on the Peco turnouts. I never had any operational issues.

In fact, I standardized on these wheels for the rest of the fleet, and I'm replacing the old Kadee wheelsets on many of my cars as I pull them out of their boxes and place them on the new layout -- or in the display cases (new layout is really, really small . . . )

To date I've used the IRC/Reboxx wheels -- I've heard Branchline is making semi-scale wheels, but apparently this is strictly a fictious product that will never see the light of day (<g>)

One last thing, I use the "Tool" as needed to clear the journal box. Doing so not only improves the rolling quality of the trucks, it also helps eliminate a lot of the black "goop" that accumulates on the rails. A lot of us spend time cleaning our track and loco wheels, never realizing that a lot of the black goop on the railheads is actually Delrin that's been placed there by the freight (and other) cars.

Marty McGuirk


Re: Accuracy of paint schemes...

Scott Pitzer
 

Remember when the introduction of the Branchline 50' box car kits was stalled... a long time? And I griped (I must have been in an especially gripy mood) because Ed Hawkins' related articles for RMJ were getting WAY ahead of the kits? There was an upside though-- when the kits came out, the instruction sheets pointed to Ed's articles for prototype info.
If there was a "GuruSite" manufacturers could point to it if they wanted to. Of course the "review" info on the site wouldn't appear until after the models were out, and therefore the packaging of the first run of models couldn't point... but the manufacturer web site could point. (Especially if they could point to a specific page about a specific model which was a good match... even if some of their other products were revealed to be more-or-less bogus on other parts of the GuruSite.)
If you walked into a shop and they had a deal on that car you hadn't quite gotten around to researching, you could use your Dick Tracy Wrist Web to look it up.

Scott Pitzer


Re: Code 88 wheels?

mjmcguirk@...
 

Mike,

Call me curious, but is there another issue (operational) that's causing you to spend time on this??) -- or is it simple idle curiousity???

And, before anyone spends an inordinate amount of time comparing apples to apples let me clarify something I hinted at in a previous post -- you shouldn't be able to find any difference between InterMountain and Reboxx wheels (outside of machining tolerances) since the wheelsets are identical -- made by the same machine, tossed into the same parts bin in the factory, and only separated when it comes time to press them onto their axles.

Marty McGuirk


Re: Code 88 wheels?

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Schuyler Larrabee writes:

Marty McGuirk writes:

The Code 88 wheel is a compromise --
Brock counters:
But, they also are not truly Code 88 wheels.
Sure they are, Mike. They're Code 88 because they measure .088" front face to back face. That's
what "Code" means, nothing more.
As I noted...I hope...long ago in this thread, I refer to the NMRA definition of Code 88, Code 110 or any other code as defined in RP-25. While the NMRA Code 88 wheel DOES have a total thickness of 0.088", it has other dimensions as well, including tread size and flange sizes. All of these dimensions together describe the NMRA Code 88 wheel. A far as I know, no one else has published a different definition of a Code 88 wheel. I DID say that I would call a wheel having a code 88 tread with a Code 110 flange a "Code 88T" wheel to differentiate it from a true Code 88 wheel. Since it turns out that this wheel might not exist and is, in fact, a Code 110 wheel with a reduced tread so that the entire wheel width is 0.088", I'll use the term Code 88T to define THAT wheel...in case a true Code 88 shows up sometime.


What you mean is that they are not an RP25 Code 88 wheel. You're right about that. IM wheels
aren't; Reboxx wheels aren't. Not sure about the others. What the IM and Reboxx wheels are, is
exactly what you said: Code 88 wheels with Code 110-thickness flanges. I've been noting that on
this list for at least two years.
Well...I glad someone is alert.<G>.

Mike Brock


Re: Mold repair (was Re: Athearn Gondola News)

Charlie Vlk
 

Another factor is with computer aided manufacturing cutting a new mold insert is not starting from scratch like it once was.
It still isn't a trivial undertaking, but you aren't relying on the art of a moldmaker to do the basic hogging out of the cavity anymore...
you have the program to recut the insert over again on file....and you have an opportunity to make any small corrections/improvements...
so Aluminum or Brass become viable mediums for molds even though there are wear and durability issues that MIGHT come up.
Charlie Vlk


Re: Accuracy of paint schemes...

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Charlie Vlk, probably moving quickly to dodge incoming, says:

I've found that the Gurus tend not to tell us how much they know what's
right or wrong but
help us learn by SHOWING us.... through articles, books, digging up and
sharing obscure photos, etc...
True, they tend to accumulate credibility by doing so, but certifying a
model as being right or
wrong doesn't mean much to me unless I can see what the deviations are and
make my own
judgements if this is a horrible thing or not.
While I agree with the notion of making up one's own mind as to the acceptability of a model, I also appreciate knowing that, in the opinion of a guru, a car is "bogus". I would then like to know just "how" bogus it is.


If the Gurus (or anybody) are thinking of starting a rating/evaluation
service it would be interesting but I don't
think it would advance the state of the art more than doing more of what
they already are doing....
Except, perhaps, the info would be easier to access. Remember John Nehrich's book on model frt cars which showed which models were "accurate" for which RRs?

Mike Brock

143941 - 143960 of 196871