Date   

FYI: Military loads

Tim O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
 

If you're interested in steam era military loads you might be
interested in this:

http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1066474447

Timothy O'Connor <timoconnor@mediaone.net>
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Railcar GRL Interchange Standard Dates

Richard Hendrickson
 

Chris Barkan asks:

...for an extended period of time starting in the 1930s (?), the 50 ton
car seemed to be have been the standard, but certain cars such as mill
gondolas, large hoppers, early covered hoppers were often 70 ton. Were these
in unrestricted interchange service as long as they had 6"x11" journals, or
were special agreements among participating railroads needed for these cars
(much like for 286K, 110 ton cars today)?
They were in unrestricted service. As, apparently, were ninety ton cars
(transformer flats, B&LE triple hoppers, etc.) I'm not sure what the
status of larger capacity HD flat cars was; some were, when loaded to
capacity, too heavy to run anywhwere but on major trunk lines. Some RRs
had weight restriction statements in their ORER entries, e.g. (for the
Louisiana & North West) "Limit of load allowed to pass over L.& N.W. RR
above marked capacity, in accordance with A.A.R. (M.C.B.) Rule 86,
providing gross weight of car and load does not exceed 200,000 pounds."
Rule 86 not being published in the ORERs, I'm not sure what its provisions
were.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Re: Two Shermans on a flat car

ian clasper <ianclasper@...>
 

Hi

Early Sherman's with dry ammunition stowage and the original suspension
system combat weight ranged from 66,800 lbs to 70,200 lbs

Remove the weight of the ammunition and the weight drops comfortably enough
below the 70,000 lbs weight to allow for chocking. These versions are
transportable two per 140,000 flat.
We have discussed photos of these tanks on flatcars here on this list

As features such as wet ammunition stowage and HVSS suspension were added,
the combat weight creeps upto between 70,600 lbs to 76,350lbs depending on
version.
These versions may or may not transportable two per 140,000 flat.
I would say Tanks being delivered from either factory or storage to camp or
port would probably be ok.
Tanks being transported between camps would probably not.

Jumbo Sherman which weighed in at 84,000lbs would only be carried one per
flat.

Hope this helps

Ian Clasper

----- Original Message -----

Back to the original question: According to the Handbook of Ordnance
Material issued March 1968 by the US Army Ordnance Center and School,
Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, the M4A3 with 76mm tube weight
71,175 pounds.
Gene Green


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Re: Content of latest RPCyc.

Charles Morrill <badlands@...>
 

C&O ---- roster of C&O BX express cars and photo; roster of C&O and Pullman
lightweight sleeping car truck assignments and photos and descriptions.
Charlie

----- Original Message -----
From: "scott459" <scott459@msn.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, January 26, 2002 1:17 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Content of latest RPCyc.


I haven't been able to peruse the latest volume-- would somebody tell me
what it has that I MUST have (as a C&O modeler). From summaries, I get the
idea it doesn't have anything on interchange freight cars-- "BX" express
cars are the closest.
I'm fairly easy to convince-- but just the fact I have all the others and
it's a great reference won't quite cut it.
Scott Pitzer







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Re: Brazelton/Albrecht drill press

Tim O'Connor <timoconnor@...>
 

I have one, and no drill bit has ever come loose in
it, even drilling through brass. Drilling through an
old Westerfield kit might be another story... ;o) The
beauty of the chuck is how precisely and easily it
centers a drill bit so there's practically no wobble.

At 11:59 PM 1/25/02 -0800, you wrote:
There has to be something to it since the Albrecht
keyless chuck is generally regarded as the finest
chuck of its kind.

Ted

--- ljack70117@adelphia.net wrote:
Why would you want a keyless chuck. You can not
tighten them as tight as
a keyed chuck.

Timothy O'Connor <timoconnor@mediaone.net>
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Two Shermans on a flat car

thompson@...
 

Gene Green writes:
Back to the original question: According to the Handbook of Ordnance
Material issued March 1968 by the US Army Ordnance Center and School,
Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, the M4A3 with 76mm tube weight
71,175 pounds.
More to the point, there are clear photos in several places of two
Shermans on flat cars which appear to be 70-ton cars.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history


Content of latest RPCyc.

scott459 <scott459@...>
 

I haven't been able to peruse the latest volume-- would somebody tell me what it has that I MUST have (as a C&O modeler). From summaries, I get the idea it doesn't have anything on interchange freight cars-- "BX" express cars are the closest.
I'm fairly easy to convince-- but just the fact I have all the others and it's a great reference won't quite cut it.
Scott Pitzer


Narrow gauge trucks

David Soderblom
 

Narrow gauge cars generally used 26-inch wheels and had a wheelbase of
48 inches (or close to that). They were built to take much less load
than a standard gauge truck and so had smaller dimensions all around,
including the size of the bolster and of the springs. I base this
statement on narrow gauge cars of the West Side Lumber Co., which
included some from the F&CC.

David Soderblom
Baltimore MD


FOR SALE: BOOKS AND BRASS

Theodore Strickland <tstrickland@...>
 

BOOKS & BRASS FOR SALE � �baby needs new shoes <G>�

Guys,

Val has informed me she is going shoe shopping today�.so I need to
sell a few books <G>.

Anyway, here are the rules�first to respond gets a 10 day wait�
personal checks OK�

S/H USPS book rate $3 for one, $5 for two or more books�alternate
methods at cost . Valuable books will be shipped insured, RRC.

All books are in excellent condition, unless indicated.

Always interested in trades�I�m looking for HO Southeastern brass,
ACL, SAL, FEC, SCL, especially Overland ACL/SAL phosphate hoppers,
and cabeese, Beaver Creek �Whale Belly�, Atlas Code 83 track and
turnouts, KD HO freight cars, SAL Val maps�.


PLESE CONTACT ME OFF-LIST Thanks for looking�..

PLEASE CROSS-POST TO ANY OTHER APPROPRIATE LIST

Ted Strickland (727) 866-1023


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HB $20

Seaboard Air Line Railway, by Richard Prince, Indiana Press, HB,
Reprint, with both dust jackets $35

Virginia Railway Depots, Donald Traser, TLC, HB $20

Classic Steam Trains of the South, Curt Tillotson, Jr. TLC, HB $20

Atlantic Coast Line - The Diesel Years, Warren Calloway, Withers, HB
$50

Classic Diesels of the South, J. Parker Lamb, TLC, HB $20

Atlantic Coast Line Passenger Service � The Postwar Years, Larry
Goolsby, TLC, HB $20

Rails to Weeds � Volume 2: Drawings of ACL Buildings in Wilmington,
Charles Kernan, SB $10

Building the Clinchfield, by James Goforth, GEM Publishers, HB, DJ $10

Building a Great Railroad � A History of the ACL Railroad Co., by
Glenn Hoffman, HB, DJ $15

Seaboard Air Line Color Guide to Freight and Passenger Equipment, by
Paul Faulk, Morning Sun, HB, DJ $35

Seaboard Coast Line in Florida � A Pictorial History, by Bob Warren &
Fred Clark, Jr. Carstens, SB $20

Seaboard Motive Power, by Warren Calloway & Paul Withers, Withers,
HB, DJ $50

Orange Blossom Special � Florida�s Distinguished Winter Train, by Ted
Shrady & Arthur Waldrop, 1st edition with Addendum�both books signed
by both authors. $25

Orange Blossom Special � Florida�s Distinguished Winter Train, by Ted
Shrady & Arthur Waldrop, 1st edition with Addendum�OBS signed by TS.
$20

Norfolk Southern Railroad, Old Dominion Line and Connections, Richard
Prince, HB $125

From the Cab- Stories of a Locomotive Engineer, by Doug Riddell,
Pentrex, SB $10


Pennsylvania Railroad:

Pennsy K-4�s Remembered, by Fred Kramer, Bells & Whistles, SB $5

Horseshoe Heritage � The Story of the Great Railroad Landmark, by Dan
Cupper, Withers, SB $8

Pennsylvania Railroad � Passenger Car and Lettering, by Charles
Blardone & Peter Tilp, PRRT&HS, HB, DJ (stamped �possibly damaged" on
inside front cover�but I couldn�t find damage) $50

Pennsylvania Railroad Compendium, Vol. #1, � PRR Freight Car
Lettering Arrangements 1954-1968 George Kusner & Nicholas Seaman,
Middle Division, SB, large format, spiral bound, slight water damage
to first few pages of lower right hand corner. $40

Illustrated History of the American Railroad (3 books in slipcase) $5
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Pennsylvania Railroad, Jacobs, Crescent, HB, DJ
Baltimore and Ohio, Timothy Jacobs, Bonanza, HB, DJ


Narrow Gauge and Logging:

Woodstock Railway � Over the Hills to Woodstock, by Edgar Mead,
Stephen Greene Press, HB, DJ $5

Narragansett Pier RR - A Short Haul to the Bay, by James Henwood,
HB, DJ $5

Bridgton & Saco River R. R. � �Busted� and Still Running, by Edgar
Mead, Stephen Greene Press, HB, DJ $5

Train Shed Cyclopedia N. 34 � Shays and Other Geared Locomotives,
Gregg $5

Catalog of the Climax Geared Locomotive, Boynton (reprint), SB $5

Heisler Geared Locomotives, PFM (reprint 1973), SB $10

The MDC Shay Handbook, by Jeff Johnston, Oso Pub., SB $10

Shay � The Lima Catalog No. S-4 1925, Single Shot (reprint), SB $10

Shay � Class B Shay Model, Single Shot (reprint), SB $10

Shay � Class C Shay Model, Single Shot (reprint), SB $10

Shay- 1919 Catalog, PFM (reprint), SB $10

Shay Service Manual � Class C Model, Single Shot, SB $10

Porter Steam Locomotives Light and Heavy, 13th ed., Original catalog,
some water damage, torn pages, rough but complete $60

Virginia & Truckee, by Lucius Beebe & Charles Clegg, Howell-North, SB
$5


Brass Catalogs and Books:

Brown Book of Brass Locomotives, 3rd Ed., by John Glabb, Chilton, SB
$15

Overland Mail (catalog) #�s: 104, 127, 128, 129, 130,131,132, $3 each

Pacific fast Mail � 25 Years of Fine Models, by Phil & Ruth Kohl $25

Pacific Fast Mail Catalog, 15th Ed. $5

Pacific Fast Mail Catalog, 9th Ed. $5

Overland Models � The First 10 Years, by Brian Marsh, Overland, Large
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Wayner Books:

Car Names and Consists, Robert Wayner, rebound in green bukram, HB
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Amtrak Consists,Robert Wayner, SB $10

Amtrak Car Diagrams, Robert Wayner, SB $10

Amtrak Car and Locomotive Spotter (including Auto-Train), 3rd Ed.,
Robert Wayner, SB $10



Misc Books:

Civil War Railroads, by Geo. Abdill, Superior Publishing, HB, DJ $5

The Collector�s Book of the Locomotive, by Edwin Alexander, Clark
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N-Scale Magazine, Hundman, Volumes 1-8 Bound (4 books) in dark blue
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Waycars of the Chicago, Burlington & Quicny, by Daniel Holbrook &
Steven Lorenz, Prototype Modeler, SB $30

Building a Lima Locomotive, by Scott Trostel, Cam-Tech , SB $10

LGB Track Planning and Technical Guide, Robert Munzing, LGB, HB
(english edition) $50


Howard Fogg and the Diesel Image, Weekend Chief, HB, DJ $50

The Northerns, by Jack Farrell & Mike Pearsall, PFM, DJ, Slipcase $100

The Mountains, by Jack Farrell & Mike Pearsall, PFM, DJ, Slipcase $100

Railroad Maps of the US, by Andrew Modeleski, Library of Congress,
SB $5

Classic Trains, first 5 issues, Kalmbach, SB $10

Railroad Station Plan Book, Kalmbach, SB $5

Locomotive Coaling Stations, Fairbanks Morse Co, TLC (reprint) $10

North American M of W Equipment, James Bradley, Bradley, SB $20

Rails to the Rim � Milepost Guide to Grand Canyon Railway, by Al
Richmond, SB $5

The Official Railway Guide, Jul/Aug 1978 %5

The Last of the Great Stations, - 40 Years of the Union Passenger
Terminal, Bill Bradley, SB, Interurbans Special 72 $10

The History, Making and Modeling of Steel, by Dean Freytag, Kalmbach,
HB, DJ $45

B&O Transportation Museum, SB $5

Along the Cape Fear, by Susan Black, Arcadia, SB (non-RR) $5

American Experss 1850-1950- A Century of Service, by Alden Hatch,
Doubleday, HB $25

Railroad Transportation � Teachers Kit (Portfolio) Fifth
Edition ,1951 with 57 prints and 2 booklets , AAR $40


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Overland 1169 FEC Wood Side Door Caboose #702-760, unpainted $160

Overland 3328.2 PRR Covered Hopper H30A Class, F/P #255823
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Overland 1312 S NYC, SAL Flexi-Van Car Mark IV, C/P silver,
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Overland 6120 SAL Centipede C/P �Modified Citrus, lettered, lights�,
(9/96) $750

Overland 1123 SAL Plywood caboose, unpainted $160

United Russian 2-10-0 �Frisco� C/P and numbered #130, not lettered,
$250

Southwind Models SWM-2001 ACL, Southern, C of G FR-3 Pulp Wood Flat
Car, unpainted, $125

Hallmark EMD E 3/6 A/B (B dummy) C/P SAL OBS with silver underframe
(very nice) $300

Sunset 2-6-6-4 B&O KB 1A, SAL R-1, unpainted, $750

Spectrum HO PRR K-4 $50

Rivarossi 1535 Southern 4-6-2 Heavy Pacific (1401) $100

Rivarossi 5435 RP&P 2-8-4 Berk #574 $100



Leapfrog �Remote Control Extender� NIB�extends signals from IR
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MRC 6200 Train Power 60 VA $60 (NIB)

MRC 8000 Tech II Sound Generator (steam and diesel) $25

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THANKS FOR LOOKING�


Railcar GRL Interchange Standard Dates

CBarkan@...
 

In my previous message (question) on this topic, I mistated the GRL for 50
ton cars and probably didn't state my question precisely enough. So before
my nit gets picked let me rephrase my questions.

In what year were each of the following gross rail loads (GRL) for 4 axle
cars made standard as the maximum for unrestricted interchange?

GRL Nominal capacity
142,000 40 ton
177,000 50 ton
220,000 70 ton
263,000 100 ton

Also, for an extended period of time starting in the 1930s (?), the 50 ton
car seemed to be have been the standard, but certain cars such as mill
gondolas, large hoppers, early covered hoppers were often 70 ton. Were these
in unrestricted interchange service as long as they had 6"x11" journals, or
were special agreements among participating railroads needed for these cars
(much like for 286K, 110 ton cars today)?

Thanks, Chris


Railcar Capacity Increases

CBarkan@...
 

Does anybody know the dates and circumstances of the various increases in the
interchange standards for gross rail load (GRL) and consequent capacity
increases that have occurred over the past century.

RRs are currently increasing from 263K lbs. GRL to 286K (100 ton to 110 ton
nominal capacity), although I confess that I don't know if that is the AAR
interchange standard yet (it is not yet for hazardous materials tank cars,
but that is due to a regulation, and is likely to change in the near furture.)

At some point in the 1960s (I think), they went from 220K (70 ton) to 263K
(100 ton), and before that from 144K (50 ton) to 220K (70 ton), and
presumably they increased from below 144K before that. But when?

If someone has this chronology I'd appreciate knowing it (and a reference
source as well would be nice).

Thanks, Chris


Re: Geared hand brake in Red Cabooses X29/M-26

ljack70117@...
 

I DO
Larry Jackman

lewise_green wrote:


It certainly isn't an Ajax housing. One of Burnett's big deals was
that Ajax always use the same housing. Although, truth to tell,
there were minor variations that resulted in three every so slightly
different models between 1926 and 1992, 1993 requirements forced a
major change in housing shape. Anyway, nobody on this list cares
what happened in 1993.


Re: Microlux Drill Press (Micromark)

ljack70117@...
 

As a machinist of 40 years experience, the Albrecht is the finest one
made for run out and precession. But you still can not tighten it up as
tight as you can one with a chuck key. I have used them and had tools
slip in them. IMHO unless you are doing aircraft or other work where you
need to hold .000050", you are wasting your money buying one.
As far as putting one on the drill press, find out how the other one is
fastened on and contact your tool house and see if they have one that
will fit.
Thank you
Larry Jackman

Ted Culotta wrote:


There has to be something to it since the Albrecht
keyless chuck is generally regarded as the finest
chuck of its kind.
Ted


Re: Microlux Drill Press (Micro-Mark)

Roger Robar <rrobar@...>
 

Until you have seen and used a drill press fitted with an Albrecht chuck,
you cannot appreciate it's worth. There is a non finer made chuck in the
world that I know of. I have a 80+ 'Sensitive Drill Press' made by Brazelton
Model Services nearly 30 yrs. old. I do not know if this Co. is still in
business today. This drill press is one of the finest model presses ever
made. The Albrecht chuck is one of the reasons.

Roger Robar


Re: Microlux Drill Press (Micromark)

Ted Culotta <ted_culotta@...>
 

There has to be something to it since the Albrecht
keyless chuck is generally regarded as the finest
chuck of its kind.

Ted

--- ljack70117@adelphia.net wrote:
Why would you want a keyless chuck. You can not
tighten them as tight as
a keyed chuck.
Thank you
Larry Jackman

ted_culotta wrote:

Sorry for the questionable content (but it is for
building freight
c

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Re: 1950's MRR

byronrose@...
 

On Thu, 24 Jan 2002 07:47:58 -0900 "Justin Kahn" <jacekahn@hotmail.com>
writes:
I don't want to roil the waters more than necessary on this thread,
but I
wonder if Byron confused the issue, or if I just missed something in
the
exchange; I don't recall that Eric Stevens had anything to do with a

depressed center flat. As I mentioned in a previous message, I
recall that
there were two articles, side-by-side, one by Gordie Odegaard, the
other (I
think) by Irv Winer.
Justin,

You're right, I just lumped all those articles from that era under Eric
Stevens byline. I know that even some of the true Dollar Car articles
were not by Eric, several were by H.O.Williams. (Who I once met in my
nearby hobby shop, he claimed, tongue in cheek, that his initials named
the scale we modeled in.) But the format for all those articles was
established by Eric, who I considered one of my heros from that era
because he did more than talk about it, he wrote it.

There were several articles in or near that time frame that went beyond
the Dollar Car concept. One on building an O ga box car and another on a
hopper car using a new material called "styrene" went a long way toward
tempting me to the then dark side of modeling freight cars that weren't
Athearns. Even one on a Swift reefer with incorrect reporting marks
helped push me along. Where are those (updated) articles now that we
REALLY need them?

But all this is coming from an old, decrepit, faulty memory which is so
full of utterly useless information that I can't quite unload to make
room for stuff I really need to know. Like who wrote the two depressed
center flat car semi-articles. Sorry.

BSR

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Re: Two Shermans on a flat car

lewise_green <willibecher@...>
 

Back to the original question: According to the Handbook of Ordnance
Material issued March 1968 by the US Army Ordnance Center and School,
Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, the M4A3 with 76mm tube weight
71,175 pounds.
Gene Green
--- In STMFC@y..., "ian clasper" <ianclasper@y...> wrote:
Hi Garth

The Tanks on the flat cars are M4A1 Shermans, these had cast
hulls rather than the more familiar welded hulls of the M4A3 and
yes, they are ready for action.

http://www.italeri.com/articolo2.asp?
ProCodice=+225&ProDescrizione=Sherman+M
4+A1
This model shows the 76mm gun turrent rather than the 75mm gun
turrent in
the photo.

Ian Clasper


----- Original Message -----
From: "Garth G. Groff" <ggg9y@v...>
To: <STMFC@y...>
Sent: Thursday, January 17, 2002 4:36 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Two Shermans on a flat car


Tim,

Nice shot, but those aren't Shermans. They are a much lighter
amphibious
tank. The one on the sling is, I
think, a Stewart. No wonder the Germans laughed at us (at first).

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Tim O'Connor wrote:

http://image.vtls.com/VTLS/SC/02/079.jpg


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Re: Geared hand brake in Red Cabooses X29/M-26

lewise_green <willibecher@...>
 

Gentlemen,
The Red Caboose geared hand brake supplied with the X29 does not
appear to be representative of any hand brake I've discovered so far.

However, if the top of the housing was a half cirle and the bottom
was straight across, it wouldn't be a bad representation of an
Equipco 3160.

Thanks for bringing this up Ian. I hadn't looked at my unassembled
kits until this evening. I need an Equipco 3160. With a Kadee
Equipco hand wheel I'll be closer than I am right now.

It certainly isn't an Ajax housing. One of Burnett's big deals was
that Ajax always use the same housing. Although, truth to tell,
there were minor variations that resulted in three every so slightly
different models between 1926 and 1992, 1993 requirements forced a
major change in housing shape. Anyway, nobody on this list cares
what happened in 1993.

Gene Green
--- In STMFC@y..., "ian clasper" <ianclasper@y...> wrote:
Hi Guys

What is the geared hand brake that is provided in Red Cabooses
X29/M-26 ?

The handwheel is Ajax, but what is the housing ? It certainly aint
Ajax !
Does it have a prototype or just a crude blob of plastic ?

Thanks

Ian Clsaper


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Re: Replacing Leaf Springs

thompson@...
 

No, Tony...the bolster on the D&RGW's 3 foot gauge truck
is narrower than on standard (fat?) gauge trucks...
Yes, but if you believe the 1903 Cyc, the difference is small. Whether it
would affect leaf spring width, I don't know.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 http://www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroads and on Western history


Re: Replacing Leaf Springs

billd@...
 

You are probably right...for 1903, Tony. I understand that these cars were built to standard gauge specs of the day(except that they were a little narrower)... goes to show you how much standard gauge cars have changed. After a trip to Chama some years ago, on my way back home (via I-25 to I-10) I passed some autoracks that SP had dumped down around Deming...after having been around the narrow gauge stuff for a couple of days the standard gauge cars looked like beached whales!

Bill Daniels
Tucson, AZ

187361 - 187380 of 192721