Date   

Re: WWII troop trains/North Platt canteen

Chet French <cfrench@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...> wrote:

Last Friday night I taped a program on PBS about the canteen for
WWII soldiers in North Platt, Nebraska; the soldiers got off the
train when the locomotive took on coal and water and then reboarded
10 minutes later.

Since these trains went from railroad to railroad, frequently with
off road equipment, I hope Mike will pass this post.

There was quite a bit of train action but no memorable freight
cars.

I found two things noteworthy. Jim and Mrs. Seacrist contibuted
money for the program. Anyone else have any dealing with Jim? He
advertised for old HO freight car models for years in MR's
classifieds. Then he went to O gauge.

They showed one train consisting of 2 troop sleepers, 2
conventional
passenger cars and a caboose. I wonder how the caboose fit in?

Most often freight pool crews were used and their caboose went with
them. This could be a case of coming out of the away-from-home
terminal on the troop train or going out of the home terminal with a
troop train and returning home on a freight train. On districts
where passenger service was more prevalent, a uniformed passenger
crew might be requested and there was, no doubt, a place made
available for the crew to ride.

Chet French
Dixon, IL


Re: Sunshine Proto Modelers Seminar question

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

Eric,
The event starts Thrusday afternoon. Sunday morning there is a
breakfast, but that's it.
Clark Propst


Re: Oil companies

Jim Williams <wwww5960@...>
 

Hi All........The book, "The American Gas Station", is by Michael Karl Witzel and published by Barnes and Noble in 1999. It was one of their in store "specials" when I found it in one of their bookstores........Best Jim Williams

Carrock1998@aol.com wrote: Jared,
There is a book titled "The Gas Station In America"

The title including the series it is from is: The Gas Station in America
(Creating the North American Landscape)

that as I recall
listed all/most of the beginnings and mergers of oil companies up until 1990
or
so. Sorry, I don't remember author

The author is John A. Jakle, Keith A. Sculle

The ISBN number for the book is 0801869196
or publisher

Sorry couldn't find out who the publisher was.

There was a reprint of the book done in 2002.
It is available from both Amazon and Barnes & Noble (used books)---you can
always check to see if others have it available.

Robert "Rocky" Jackson

Chuck Hladik







__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com


Re: Oil companies

Garth Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Jared and Chuck:

Here's what you need:

OCLC 28927327
040 DLC
020 0801847230 (alk. paper) : $32.95
020 0801847249 (pbk. : alk. paper)
050 TL153 .J27 1994
082 338.4/762928/60973
100 Jakle, John A.
245 The gas station in America / John A. Jakle & Keith A. Sculle.
260 Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, c1994.
300 xi, 272 p. :ill., maps ; 27 cm.
440 Creating the North American landscape
504 Includes bibliographical references (p. 249-261) and index.
650 Service stations -- United States -- History.
650 Architecture -- United States -- 20th century.
650 Roadside architecture -- United States.

If you show this to any public or university librarian, they should be able to borrow it for you. There is also a 2002 edition from Johns Hopkins, but the 1994 edition has the most holding libraries listed on OCLC. The book might still be in print (check Amazon), and used copies are certainly floating about.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff



RUTLANDRS@aol.com wrote:

Jared,
There is a book titled "The Gas Station In America" that as I recall listed all/most of the beginnings and mergers of oil companies up until 1990 or so. Sorry, I don't remember author or publisher.
Chuck Hladik






Yahoo! Groups Links






Re: Oil companies

Carrock1998@...
 

Jared,
There is a book titled "The Gas Station In America"

The title including the series it is from is: The Gas Station in America
(Creating the North American Landscape)

that as I recall
listed all/most of the beginnings and mergers of oil companies up until 1990
or
so. Sorry, I don't remember author

The author is John A. Jakle, Keith A. Sculle

The ISBN number for the book is 0801869196
or publisher

Sorry couldn't find out who the publisher was.

There was a reprint of the book done in 2002.
It is available from both Amazon and Barnes & Noble (used books)---you can
always check to see if others have it available.

Robert "Rocky" Jackson


Chuck Hladik


Re: SOU Low Side Gondolas from Speedwitch Media

Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton <smokeandsteam@...>
 

Black is correct for cars before the late fifties, with Roman lettering.
There was a period in the late fifties and the out-of-scope early
sixties before the introduction of the familiar block lettering when you
would find open cars being painted with the brown paint and Roman
lettering. I haven't yet been able to find the exact date for the
instruction to change from black paint to brown, but 1957 sticks in my
mind.

Aidrian


NYC air-activated container gons with 5 containers

proto48er
 

Guys - I have several questions for the New York Central experts out
there!

This pertains only to NYC container gondolas in Lot 755-G, which
carried (5) large-size (8" taller) air activated containers per
car. The reason for the questions is that I have a brass kit (O-
scale) and want to make it into what should be a unique car in that
scale.

First question - (40) cars from Lot 377-G (Pressed Steel Car Co. -
1919) were converted to NYC #501640-#501734 {part of Lot 755-G} at
the Avis Shops in 1946. As built, these cars had flat drop ends and
USRA 70-ton Andrews style trucks. They were the USRA steel
gondolas, not clones. After they were converted in 1946, did they
still have the flat drop ends?

Second question - Did they keep the USRA 70-ton Andrews trucks after
conversion?

Third question - After conversion, did the NYC move the pivoting
brake staff over to the side of the car (in the position the clones
had) or did they leave it in the as-built position near the striker
plate?

Fourth question - Does anybody have a decent photo of one of these
40 cars? I recall seeing a side view of one on the web but cannot
find it after due diligence on Google. I do have a builders photo
of one new in 1919, but I am looking for a shot of one after
conversion. Someone here referenced a website that had aerial
photos of the port of New York which showed about 30 of these air
activated container gons waiting to be ferried across the Hudson,
and I cannot find those photos either! Even a crummy photo would
probably answer all of the above questions.

Fifth question - Does anyone have a decent photo of the remainder of
the cars in Lot 755-G which were converted from gons in Lot 557-G?
These cars had Drednaught drop ends as-built (clones).

Observation - NYC was crazy to pick Lot numbers 755-G, 377-G and 557-
G for one group of related cars!! I bet more than one of them was
mis-labeled by the car painters!

Thank you for all your help! A.T. Kott


Re: WWII troop trains/North Platt canteen

armprem
 

I have been on a few troop trains and never on a single one that had a
caboose,but that doesn't mean it never happened.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "labuell51" <lbuell@wideopenwest.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, August 21, 2006 9:39 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: WWII troop trains/North Platt canteen


Bruce Smith wrote:
Ed,
There are several possibilities -
1) The cars were so full of troops that the train crew needed the
extra space.
2) The cars may have been destined to be dropped somewhere and
the train crew needed a place to rid for the trip back.
3) The train may have been carrying additional freight cars with
equipment, or due to pick up freight cars with equipment and the
caboose would have carried the markers (and rear end crew) behind
those cars. Note that after early 1943 this "mixed" MAIN was
unusual
but certainly possible.
4) It may just have been a convenient way to get a caboose where
it
was needed as the MAIN doesn't sound like it was even close to
tonnage <G>.

Regards
Bruce

Mixed MAINS were indeed a reality. My father joined the Navy in
early 1945. He traveled to basic training in April 1945, to San
Diego from western Arkansas. He boarded a troopsleeper on a train
in Booneville, Arkansas (CRIP) and five days later arrived in San
Diego via the ATSF and who know what other railroad. At this time
the military still traveled on circuitous routes to "fool the
enemy". Their car was the only passenger car on several freight
trains and they were "set out" every night for pick-up by another
train. Not having a diner, they stopped for meals along the way.
He did not pay much attention to the types of freight cars on the
trains but did notice (smelled?) that on several occasions there
were loaded stock cars in the consist.
Larry Buell






Yahoo! Groups Links








--
No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.405 / Virus Database: 268.11.3/423 - Release Date: 8/18/06


Re: WWII troop trains/North Platt canteen

Larry Buell
 

Bruce Smith wrote:
Ed,
There are several possibilities -
1) The cars were so full of troops that the train crew needed the
extra space.
2) The cars may have been destined to be dropped somewhere and
the train crew needed a place to rid for the trip back.
3) The train may have been carrying additional freight cars with
equipment, or due to pick up freight cars with equipment and the
caboose would have carried the markers (and rear end crew) behind
those cars. Note that after early 1943 this "mixed" MAIN was
unusual
but certainly possible.
4) It may just have been a convenient way to get a caboose where
it
was needed as the MAIN doesn't sound like it was even close to
tonnage <G>.

Regards
Bruce

Mixed MAINS were indeed a reality. My father joined the Navy in
early 1945. He traveled to basic training in April 1945, to San
Diego from western Arkansas. He boarded a troopsleeper on a train
in Booneville, Arkansas (CRIP) and five days later arrived in San
Diego via the ATSF and who know what other railroad. At this time
the military still traveled on circuitous routes to "fool the
enemy". Their car was the only passenger car on several freight
trains and they were "set out" every night for pick-up by another
train. Not having a diner, they stopped for meals along the way.
He did not pay much attention to the types of freight cars on the
trains but did notice (smelled?) that on several occasions there
were loaded stock cars in the consist.
Larry Buell


Oil companies

Jared Harper <harper-brown@...>
 

Where can I look to find the relationships among some of the various
oil companies--Kanotex, Skelly, Sovereign, and Derby are the ones I am
mainly interested in.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


KCS 15500 to 15599 rebuilt boxcar

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

I'm finishing the decals on Greg's car from the Cocoa Beach Clinic and was
wondering where the end initials and numbers go, on the top rib, above the
top rib, or someplace else.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: K Brake rebuilding to AB brakes on tank cars after 1954 bans

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

stefanelaine wrote:

As I understand it, K brakes were banned in interchange on tank cars
as of October 1, 1953 and had a final ban (returning cars)by January
1, 1954.

Is there evidence that there was a large scale rebuilding of tank cars
to equip them with AB brakes at this time or were many of the cars
scrapped then?

Was there any "grace" period?
Stefan,

It was in the early-to-mid 1930's that the ICC mandated the use of AB Brakes. All new freight cars built afterwards had to have AB Brake Systems. Freight Cars built prior to the Mandate were to be retrofitted with AB Brake Systems - IIRC, the first date was 1/1/1946. The date that this was to be accomplished kept being pushed back first due to the Depression, and then WW II.

Effectively, most of the retrofitting was started after WW II particularly in the late 1940's. Many roads had to examine their freight car fleets, and decide which cars built before the early 1930's were worth retrofitting, and what cars were not worth it. If you compare the freight car roster of any road as published in a WW II ORER with one in the early 1950's, you might be able to figure out which car series were not retrofitted as they had mostly disappeared from the 1950's ORER's.

Another guide to what car series were retrofitted is whether the cars were given post-War heralds and slogans - the shopping for the retrofit provided a dandy opportunity to repaint the car.

Tim Gilbert


Re: K Brake rebuilding to AB brakes on tank cars after 1954 bans

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Aug 21, 2006, at 1:19 PM, stefanelaine wrote:

As I understand it, K brakes were banned in interchange on tank cars
as of October 1, 1953 and had a final ban (returning cars)by January
1, 1954.

Is there evidence that there was a large scale rebuilding of tank cars
to equip them with AB brakes at this time or were many of the cars
scrapped then?
The appliction of AB equipment to most cars did not involve "rebuilding." Standard practice was to fit the AB cylinder onto the mounting where the KC cylinder/reservoir were originally installed and then add frame outriggers as needed to support the separate AB valve and reservoir. There are many photos of cars so modified. Notable exceptions were UTL's "Van Dyke" frameless tank cars, built early in the 20th century with heavy tank bottom sheets and no center sills. As the surviving "Van Dyke" cars were very old by 1953 and there was no simple way to attach AB equipment, they were retired without receiving AB brakes.

Was there any "grace" period?
No.

By 1954-55 should I expect to be running only AB equipped tank cars
(since interchanged privately owned cars predominate)?
Yes.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Oil companies

Charles Hladik
 

Jared,
There is a book titled "The Gas Station In America" that as I recall
listed all/most of the beginnings and mergers of oil companies up until 1990 or
so. Sorry, I don't remember author or publisher.
Chuck Hladik


Re: WWII troop trains/North Platt canteen

jaley <jaley@...>
 

On Aug 21, 12:29pm, ljack70117@adelphia.net wrote:
Subject: Re: [STMFC] WWII troop trains/North Platt canteen
On the UN PAC the main trains used cabooses for the train crew. The
military had their people in the cars.
Larry,

I don't know about WWII, but by the early 1950's (Korean War era)
this was no longer true. There are many MAIN trains shown (in their
entirety!) on the UP outside of Fort Riley, KS in the DVD "Union Pacific
Steam Classics Volume 1" from Greg Scholl Video Productions. None of them
had cabooses.

Regards,

-Jeff


--
Jeff Aley jaley@pcocd2.intel.com
DPG Chipsets Product Engineering
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533


K Brake rebuilding to AB brakes on tank cars after 1954 bans

oliver
 

As I understand it, K brakes were banned in interchange on tank cars
as of October 1, 1953 and had a final ban (returning cars)by January
1, 1954.

Is there evidence that there was a large scale rebuilding of tank cars
to equip them with AB brakes at this time or were many of the cars
scrapped then?

Was there any "grace" period?

By 1954-55 should I expect to be running only AB equipped tank cars
(since interchanged privately owned cars predominate)?


Stefan


Re: WWII troop trains/North Platt canteen

ljack70117@...
 

On the UN PAC the main trains used cabooses for the train crew. The military had their people in the cars.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@adelphia.net

On Aug 21, 2006, at 11:42 AM, ed_mines wrote:

Last Friday night I taped a program on PBS about the canteen for
WWII soldiers in North Platt, Nebraska; the soldiers got off the
train when the locomotive took on coal and water and then reboarded
10 minutes later.

Since these trains went from railroad to railroad, frequently with
off road equipment, I hope Mike will pass this post.

There was quite a bit of train action but no memorable freight cars.

I found two things noteworthy. Jim and Mrs. Seacrist contibuted
money for the program. Anyone else have any dealing with Jim? He
advertised for old HO freight car models for years in MR's
classifieds. Then he went to O gauge.

They showed one train consisting of 2 troop sleepers, 2 conventional
passenger cars and a caboose. I wonder how the caboose fit in?

Seeing this program I was proud to be an American.

Ed






Yahoo! Groups Links









Re: caboose on troop trains

Thomas Baker
 

On some railroads, a caboose was always tacked on to a troop train. Whether this was a practice on all roads is a question some might be able to answer.

Tom

________________________________


Re: WWII troop trains/North Platt canteen

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

ed_mines wrote:

Last Friday night I taped a program on PBS about the canteen for
WWII soldiers in North Platt, Nebraska; the soldiers got off the
train when the locomotive took on coal and water and then reboarded
10 minutes later.
In 2003, Bob Greene, a columnist for one of the Chicago papers, wrote a book about the North Platte Canteen - "Once Upon A Town - The Miracle of the North Platte Canteen." The book has no photos, and may be scarce on trains, as it is more stories about the women who served and the soldiers who passed through. The book and audio tape is available new and used after searching http://bookfinder.com/ for author "Bob Greene" and title "Once upon a Town - the Miracle of the North Platte Canteen." Prices start at just over $10.00 for a new book, but under $5.00 for both the used book or audio tape.

Tim Gilbert


Re: WWII troop trains/North Platt canteen

Bruce Smith
 

On Aug 21, 2006, at 10:42 AM, ed_mines wrote:

Last Friday night I taped a program on PBS about the canteen for
WWII soldiers in North Platt, Nebraska; the soldiers got off the
train when the locomotive took on coal and water and then reboarded
10 minutes later.
They showed one train consisting of 2 troop sleepers, 2 conventional
passenger cars and a caboose. I wonder how the caboose fit in?
Ed,

There are several possibilities -
1) The cars were so full of troops that the train crew needed the extra space.
2) The cars may have been destined to be dropped somewhere and the train crew needed a place to rid for the trip back.
3) The train may have been carrying additional freight cars with equipment, or due to pick up freight cars with equipment and the caboose would have carried the markers (and rear end crew) behind those cars. Note that after early 1943 this "mixed" MAIN was unusual but certainly possible.
4) It may just have been a convenient way to get a caboose where it was needed as the MAIN doesn't sound like it was even close to tonnage <G>.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the
windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0

136481 - 136500 of 192624