Date   

Wheel Painting Jig

Jim Betz
 

I put a photo in the FILES section in a folder of the same name as
this post. The photo shows how I make my own wheel painting jig by
taking a piece of brass tubing and filing a toothed edge on one end and
cutting holes in foam. If you use the correct size foam you can do
both ends of the wheelset at once.
When I put the wheels in the foam I take a hold of the point of the
axle and sort of 'stir' it to get it down to where the foam forms just
a slight dimple to the tread (see pic). I let the paint dry fully
before I take them out. You will get very little, if any, over spray
on the treads. The same jig works for all code wheels (110,88,etc.)
and also for both 33" and 36". Not sure what size the tubing is, never
measured it. I just took a wheel set to my brass bits box and found a
hunk that was just smaller than the tread.
Oh yes, to cut the holes in the foam with the brass hole saw I just
chuck it up in a drill and pull the centers out after I've cut them all.

Feel free to add your own pics of your own jigs if you have them!

- Jim in San Jose


Re: RPM meets

cj riley <cjriley42@...>
 

Charlie,

FYI...Open judging is the norm at NMRA nationals and many regionals. Folks are
welcome to listen without commenting and it is intendied that they may learn
something. It certainly sounds like the smudge was not obviously weathering,
but it is also possibly due to mediocre judging.

CJ Riley

--- Charlie Vlk <cvlk@...> wrote:

Tony-
I remember walking around the Contest Room at an NMRA National during judging
(somehow they were so wrapped up in their deliberations that they didn't kick
me out!!!) and overhearing the judges arguing if the smudges on the side of a
drop-dead beautiful scratchbuilt coaling tower were intentional weathering or
poor workmanship....and, the conclusion was, since it wasn't noted on the
entry form, it must not have been weathering. That kind of "system" (or
people's interpretation of it) can ruin any desire to work to get a merit
badge!!!
By contrast, there wasn't a model on display at Naperville that I didn't
appreciate....and thanks to everyone who brought them and the presentors who
spent the time and effort to share the results of their prototype and
modeling research in the sessions!!! (It was also fun to see the results of
some of my "modeling"....albeit with the help of some Korean and Chinese
factory workers... running around on the Midwest ModuTrak layout.... and
especially the World's Largest BLI Locomotive...
the ex- DRINW 121 / Ex BN 121 / nee CB&Q 9255 at the Illinois Railway Museum
which was recently painted as CB&Q 9255 using my Broadway Limited artwork)!!!
Charlie Vlk







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Re: RPM meets

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Charlie Vlk wrote:
I remember walking around the Contest Room at an NMRA National during judging (somehow they were so wrapped up in their deliberations that they didn't kick me out!!!) and overhearing the judges arguing if the smudges on the side of a drop-dead beautiful scratchbuilt coaling tower were intentional weathering or poor workmanship....and, the conclusion was, since it wasn't noted on the entry form, it must not have been weathering . . .
I understand your point, Charlie, but put yourself in the position of a judge. Evaluating by eyeball only is not how the NMRA contest is managed. Like it or not, the NMRA system is an internally consistent one with certain goals.
I don't know which contest you visited, but "open judging," in which anyone is welcome to watch and listen to judging (though not to converse or interject), is applied from time to time. Personally, I am greatly in favor of it. Contestants, present or future, learn an enormous amount by seeing what the judges are trying to do. I'm advocating that you see it in the same light.
Keep in mind that "drop dead beautiful" mostly describes "finish," and such a model may have numerous flaws in workmanship (small ones, evident to judges who examine closely), or in prototype conformity. Whatever the NMRA contest is, it isn't a "Beauty Contest."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: House car for groceries?

Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...>
 

Posted by: "Kurt Laughlin" fleeta@... kurt_laughlin Wed Nov 1, 2006 4:59 pm (PST) Hi Garth:

Yeah, I know, I was just using the common appelation, taken from the AAR
class description: "RB - Beverage, ice, water, or vinegar refrigerator. . ."

Thanks,
KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Garth Groff

RBLs weren't just for beverages. . . .
===================

It seems to me that there is something here that is being mis-stated. Here is a perspective on the car type as seen by someone who was in car management in the 60's. My cooments apply pretty much equally to the 50's.

An RB was an insulated car similar to the ubiquitous RS, but without ice bunkers.

The original beer, wine, etc designation disappeared around 1960. But that didn't really tell you what the cars were used for. It was an obsolete term going back to at least 1917.

For more detail on the veolution of the designations, here is a link to a site that has the codes as presented in ORER's from 1917 to 1999. http://www.nakina.net/aartype.html#Reefer

The same car with load protective devices became an RBL. I believe these became really common in the 60's, maybe late 50's, but Tim Gilbert can provide the right statistics.

There was an important administrative reason that favored the RBL over the RB, or XI. Railroad owned RB and XI cars were general service and could not be assigned. By 1960 there was a strong trend to using only assigned cars in insulated food service because it was much easier to assure car supply and maintain the quality of the cars. RB and XI, as general service cars could not be restricted to not haul commodites that the food products shippers would consider as contaminating. The RBL, as a car with load protective devices fell under a Car Service Directive that allowed these cars to be restricted to assigned service.

BTW, the only difference between XI and Rb was that to be a car type R a car had to meet a specified minimum insulation requirement.

Any of those car types could be used for commodities that required temperature protection, from chocolate in the summer to canned goods in the winter.






Malcolm Laughlin, Editor 617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478


Re: RPM meets

Charles Hladik
 

Charlie,
Having judged at NMRA events I find that the "open judging" is
beneficial to the entrant and sightseers. And it sure has improved my modeling!
Sure many will never see operation, but a lot of them will. They are not
just "another pretty face" but highly detailed models. OK, so some are "just
another pretty face" because they will never see the layout, but "popular
voting" just doesn't do justice to the detail.
Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division


Re: Longevity and numbers of M&StL double sheathed boxcars

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

I'm at work, so I don't have access to any info other than to say these
were 36' cars with three different end bracing treatments in the same
number series. All M&StL box cars were even numbered all other car
types were odd numbered. The cars Soph protographed were at one of the
local cement plants, there were four of them. I think they went to the
Boone & Scenic Valley with the L&M caboose and wood side dump jennies.
There's an in service photo in one of the RP Cycs.
Later,
Clark Propst


Longevity and numbers of M&StL double sheathed boxcars

Mark Heiden
 

Hello everyone,

I'm looking for some information regarding some Minneapolis & St Louis
36ft double sheathed, truss rod boxcars. Two photos are available on
the NEB&W website at:

http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/rolling-stock/Soph-Marty/XM-shorty-M&StL-
26000-6-SDM.jpg

http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/rolling-stock/Soph-Marty/XM-shorty-M&StL-
26250-from-Propst.jpg

The NEB&W website simply lists the cars as belonging to the 26000
series. Does anyone know the complete number series, and was the
numbering even or odd? Also, were any of these cars still in
interchange service in the late 1940s?

Thanks,
Mark Heiden


Lettering PRR and B&O gondola help?

Gatwood, Elden J SAD <Elden.J.Gatwood@...>
 

Folks;

Are any of you aware of a decal made for the 3'5" Shadow Keystone used on
some classes of gondola? Also, of any makers of an 18" SK logo? Other than
the out-of-production Middle Division G22 SK set, is there any other GOOD set
available that has the smaller "paired" (~11") spelled out PENNSYLVANIA
(other than the Champ "Long Gon" set)? I am finding more and more gaps in
the coverage, and have several painted gons waiting to be lettered in
"other-than-Circle Key" schemes, but there seem to be no decals available....



Also, is anyone aware of a GOOD decal set that I can use for a B&O O-27A in
the later billboard scheme that has the smaller ampersand? The Champ one
seems rather yellow and fuzzy, but I will use it in the event there is
nothing else.



Thanks for any advice!



Elden Gatwood


Re: RPM meets

Charlie Vlk
 

Tony-
I remember walking around the Contest Room at an NMRA National during judging (somehow they were so wrapped up in their deliberations that they didn't kick me out!!!) and overhearing the judges arguing if the smudges on the side of a drop-dead beautiful scratchbuilt coaling tower were intentional weathering or poor workmanship....and, the conclusion was, since it wasn't noted on the entry form, it must not have been weathering. That kind of "system" (or people's interpretation of it) can ruin any desire to work to get a merit badge!!!
By contrast, there wasn't a model on display at Naperville that I didn't appreciate....and thanks to everyone who brought them and the presentors who spent the time and effort to share the results of their prototype and modeling research in the sessions!!! (It was also fun to see the results of some of my "modeling"....albeit with the help of some Korean and Chinese factory workers... running around on the Midwest ModuTrak layout.... and especially the World's Largest BLI Locomotive...
the ex- DRINW 121 / Ex BN 121 / nee CB&Q 9255 at the Illinois Railway Museum which was recently painted as CB&Q 9255 using my Broadway Limited artwork)!!!
Charlie Vlk


Re: Modeler's Choice Wheel Painting jig

Randy Bachmann <r.bachmann@...>
 

Hi Robert,

I Just updated our website (http://www.modelerschoice.com/index.htm)
with information on the wheel painting masks. They are only $3.00 per
set. They come in 33" or 36" wheel diameters. Each set will hold 8
wheelsets.

Randy Bachmann
Modeler's Choice


--- In STMFC@..., Bob Miller <cajonpass02@...> wrote:

Where can I find those.

I saw the photo from Naperville.




Robert J. Miller, CFA

"If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land it will be in the guise
of fighting a foreign enemy"
James Madison, 4th U.S. President, (1751-1836)




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Re: Modeler's Choice Wheel Painting jig

Jim & Lisa Hayes <jimandlisa97225@...>
 

Try the Modelers Choice website http://www.modelerschoice.com/index.htm



Jim Hayes

Portland Oregon



_____

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Bob
Miller
Sent: Wednesday, November 01, 2006 5:33 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Modeler's Choice Wheel Painting jig



Where can I find those.

I saw the photo from Naperville.

Robert J. Miller, CFA
_,_._,___


Re: One Huge Glue Problem

Rob & Bev Manley
 

Exposure to water and humidity diminishes it's potency.
Rob

----- Original Message -----
From: cf5250
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, October 25, 2006 3:45 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: One Huge Glue Problem


Ted Larson wrote

>>> I still don't know what is in brake fluid that makes it remove
>>> paint.

Some form of ethylene glycol... I say after digging around for data
on the internet. Evidently this is the stuff that attacks paint, and
it's only found in DOT Type 3 and Type 4 brake fluids. It also mixes
(absorbs?) w/ water and humidity easily, and is highly flammable when
mixed with swimming pool chlorine. (Gee, I didn't know that!) It is
safe to use with plastics that don't include butyl rubber (e.g. ABS).

Tim O'Connor


Re: Naperville Photos

Rhbale@...
 

Thanks for sharing your photos.

Dick Bale
Carlsbad, CA


Modeler's Choice Wheel Painting jig

Robert J Miller CFA
 

Where can I find those.

I saw the photo from Naperville.




Robert J. Miller, CFA

"If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy"
James Madison, 4th U.S. President, (1751-1836)




__________________________________________________________________________________________
Check out the New Yahoo! Mail - Fire up a more powerful email and get things done faster.
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RPM meets... GOT MILK?

Greg Martin
 

The Good Doctor writes:

I am enjoying the comments of a number of perceptive attendants from this
list at the recent Naperville, and the more distant (but also yet upcoming)
Cocoa Beach meets.

I loved the 1-1/2 hour segments at Naperville. Make no mistake, the biggest
draw of these meets is the social networking between people of like
interests; and as mentioned in this regard, the model display
room was packed to the rafters between seminars with participants heating up
the atmosphere with endless jawboning. Much of this same, and even more
intensive jawboning continues on in the evenings in the lobby, the bar, and in a
number of hospitable participants' hotel rooms late into the night. As Clark
points out, this is not possible in day meets where the carpet is rolled up at
5:00 PM.

I noted no general difference in display model quality between Naperville
and Cocoa- in both cases quality levels that I can still only aspire to.

The seminar seats were terrible, and too often the pain in one's rear end
could be more diverting than the seminar subject being addressed (it did tend
to keep one from drowsing off, however, - another
problem, but usually self-inflicted)p

Pick your poison: If meets are held in convenient hotels with requisite
facilities that are willing to be afforded by the participants, then do not
expect in-house food that is much more than mediocre, and overpriced to boot.
Cheap rooms = overpriced food, and adjust expectations accordingly. Because these
are not truly top-tier hotels, the kitchen staffs usually experience high
turnover, and then commonly with less experienced and creative people.

The food at the Naperville Holiday Inn was both overpriced and truly
mediocre- in one case, downright awful- but it *was* very, very convenient. The
Cocoa Beach Hilton's food quality was generally better in this regard, no less
convenient, but still not great. IMHO, the tradeoff is regrettable, but
acceptable.

H-mmm. Perhaps a roach coach lunch wagon at Cocoa, Mike and Jeff? (you guys
have nothing better to do over the noon hour anyhow :-) !)

Denny






Doc,

Let's not forget those nice fresh, warm cookies that seem to appear from
nowhere when we are in Cocoa Beach. GOT MILK?

Greg Martin


Re: casting foundry freight cars

Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton <smokeandsteam@...>
 

Tony probably meant to mention that a gondola would never have been a full
load by volume - the pigs would have been piled up over the trucks and not
in very big piles either. Low-sided gons were often used in this traffic, at
least on the Southern.



My own experience in working in small foundry was a thirty odd years ago;
the place employed perhaps a dozen people and was mostly a supplier of
manhole covers and the like. Much of the raw material coming in was in the
form of scrap cast iron - breaking the bigger castings into manageable
chunks with a very big hammer was very enjoyable work for a seventeen year
old.



Aidrian

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Anthony Thompson
Sent: Wednesday, November 01, 2006 8:28 AM
To: STMFC@...
A gondola
of pigs, or a covered hopper of sand, represents a lot of material, and
an unloading challenge, relative to a box car. And finished castings
would likely go out in box cars.


Re: Alan Welch's handout - riveter

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Although I haven't used it that much, the biggest problem with the NWSL
riveter seems to be is slop and the lack of a way to control the feed. A
friend of mine took his NWSL riveter and added an XY table to it along with
a pair of dial indicators to solve these problems.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Re: House car for groceries?

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Hi Garth:

Yeah, I know, I was just using the common appelation, taken from the AAR class description: "RB - Beverage, ice, water, or vinegar refrigerator. . ."

Thanks,
KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Garth Groff

RBLs weren't just for beverages. . . .


Re: House car for groceries?

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Thanks for the good info Clark. BTW, I checked about half the list and all the RR cars were XMs and the private owner cars were RS. It may be a little early for my layout, maybe before RBs started to be common outside beer haulage.

KL


Prototype Rails 2007 clinics

jaley <jaley@...>
 

On Nov 1, 10:07am, Denny Anspach wrote:
Subject: [STMFC] Re: RPM meets
The Cocoa Beach Hilton's food quality was generally
better in this regard, no less convenient, but still not great. IMHO,
the tradeoff is regrettable, but acceptable.

H-mmm. Perhaps a roach coach lunch wagon at Cocoa, Mike and Jeff?
(you guys have nothing better to do over the noon hour anyhow :-) !)

Denny

Denny,

In fact, during Prototype Rails, I usually have my lunch catered:
my wife goes across the street to Sonny's BBQ and brings me back a
sandwich. I find that it is tasty, inexpsensive, and best of all: FAST.

By the way, the clinics are shaping up nicely. Topics include
(subject to change):

Building a prototype layout
Modeling Water
The Overland Limited
What tank cars haul and why (post-1960)
Eccentricities in standard freight cars
Easy Model Signal System
NYC Gons of the 1960's
Weathering with Acrylics
SRR 50' box cars serving the auto industry
20K gal non-insulated tank cars (post 1960)
SAL, ACL, & CofG Gons 1920-50
NYC USRA box cars
Modern intermodal (tbd)
NRC Refrigerator cars
B&O Open Hoppers 1919-63
Wilburton Trestle
Modeling WV: P&WV and P&LE in O scale
Designing Backwards from Operating Goals
Scratchbuilding a coal distributor
Pullman seasonal reassignment to Florida
Kahn's meat reefer kitbash (hands-on)
Building Craftsman Structure kits
Phosphate hoppers
Modeling Track
CGW Car assignments 1968
Kitbashing Ltwt Passenger Cars
Kitbashing Walthers Hwt Passenger Cars
Kitbashing Freight Cars
Rebuilding a Layout
Santa Fe Reefers
CA Narrow Gauge RR's
Large military guns on flat cars (gun flats)
Modeling opportunities w/ Passenger Trains
Trucking in the Classic Era
SP Tank Cars
FGEX / BREX / WFEX wood reefers
IRT Pelham Elevated line
L&N / SRR prototype layout
Detailing Roofs and Walls
SRR and ACL Trackage rights from VA to FL
Steel Industry freight car loads


Regards,

-Jeff


--
Jeff Aley jaley@...
DPG Chipsets Product Engineering
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533

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