Date   

Mainline Magazine's Demise

asychis@...
 

Frankly, I don't see why ceasation of Mainline Modeler is being treated as a
such a huge loss -- the magazine has been suffering from a severe lack of
focus for years. Agree with SGL that the earlier years were great

I have to agree with Marty. When Mainline first came out it was
ground-breaking. I remember hearing comments that even the ads were interesting. I
remember "Notable" New Products, not just New Products. There was air about it
that said this is something different. That definitely changed, and although I
held on with subscriptions to the last, I was becoming disappointed with each
subsequent issue. Be back to what Marty mentioned, there is no reason to worry
about this. Magazines come and go. We have great publications such as Ted's
new venture and of course Ed Hwakins and Pat Wider's RR Prototype CYC. They
more than compensate in my opinion.

With the way the content changed in Mainline, and the change from a seemingly
new way to do a magazine to a run-of-the-mill magazine, I wonder how long RMJ
is going to carry on? I'm sure MM's demise probably helps RMJ to an extent,
but let's remember that it wasn't very long ago that RMJ was re-running old
articles from the 1980s. And talk about typos and an unorganized magazine!
IT's good, but it has its flaws.

Jerry Michels


GopherRail 2007 -- Prototype Modelers welcome in Minneapolis, Feb 24, 2007

Bob Sterner <bobsterner@...>
 

GopherRail (http://www.gopherrail.org) is expanding this year and
will include prototype modelling displays and clinics. GopherRail
2007 will include:

*Clinics and presentations on prototype and modeling topics -
speakers include Rich Remiarz (GN), Stu Nelson (dispatching the Soo
Line), Joe Binish (airbrushing/custom painting), Bob Rivard & Chuck
Derus (weathering your fleet), Andy Inserra (a year trackside),
Darren Voorhees (intro to Free-Mo modules), and Jeff Crump (riding
the Alaska Railroad and more).

*Railfan videos by Bob Rivard shown throughout the day
*Open House at the University RR club permanent layout
*Huge modular layout organized by the Minnesota Free-Mo Modelers
*Model display tables (Prototype Modelers are welcome!)
*And door prizes!

New this year - Open Mic Night - Who knows, you could be the next big
star! In the evening we'll be opening the floor to you so bring your
slides, PowerPoint presentations, handouts, etc. Sign up sheets will
be posted the day of the show with first come first serve 1/2 hour
slots starting at 5 pm. All railroad topics past and present,
modeling and prototype, are fair game!

All GopherRail activities will be located in 1701 University Ave.
S.E. on the University of Minnesota campus and conveniently located
just a few blocks from numerous Dinkytown restaurants. Details and
the latest news at http://www.gopherrail.org.

Admission: $7 at the door, $2 discount for students.

Your host will be The Railroad Club at the University of Minnesota.
This is the club's biggest fund raiser of the year. Please support
the next generation of model railroad enthusiasts. For more
information about The Railroad Club at the University of Minnesota,
see http://www.tc.umn.edu/~rrclubum/ If you have questions or
suggestions or you wish to volunteer yourself or suggest someone as
a GopherRail speaker, send an email to the club president Dan Van Lith
(vanl0054(at)umn.edu).

See you there!

The Railroad Club at the University of Minnesota


The DS/SS split - help needed

laramielarry <ostresh@...>
 

Hi Folks

Ever since finishing the transcription of box and auto records from
the July, 1950, ORER into an Excel file and making it available to
you all on the STEFA download site, I have been adding auxiliary
information that will allow us to determine the breakdown of car
types into double sheathed, single sheathed, steel, and other
categories and subcategories.

So far I have about 96% of the over 700,000 cars classified, with the
following results:

U.S. box, auto, and ventilator cars in interchange service, July,
1950 ORER:
Type, %, number
DS 9.0% 64,653
SS 20.5% 146,557
steel 66.0% 471,732
Other 0.6% 4,538
Unknown 3.9% 27,649
Total 100% 715,129

In words, with over 96% of the fleet classified, about 2/3 are steel,
and 1/3 are SS or DS; the SS/DS split is about 2/3 SS, 1/3 DS.

There is considerable variation among the railroads, however. For
example:

NYC: DS=430, SS=381, steel=63295, unknown=45
NYC: (.7%, .6%, 98.7%, .1%)
FRISCO: DS=526, SS=8835, steel=3078, unknown=708
FRISCO: (4.0%, 67.2%, 23.4%, 5.4%)
SOUTHERN: DS=7248, SS=0, steel=17946, unknown=153
SOUTHERN: (28.6%, 0.0%, 70.8%, .6%)
GN: DS=14840, SS=2998, steel=2499, plywood=1963, unknown=0
GN: (66.5%, 13.4%, 11.2%, 8.8%, 0.0%)

Right now, the "other" category consists mostly of the GN's plywood
sheathed cars, the ATSF's "panel" cars, and a few aluminum cars.
Also, there is one brick car, ATSF 40024, AAR mechanical designation
XM, IL = 39'6", IH = 7'3", CAPY = 2373 cu. ft., 45000 lb., no doors.

I consulted many different sources in order to compile this
information, including books, magazines, manufacturers' web sites,
the NEB&W database (John Nehrich's summaries), and the archives of
this site. Unfortunately, my copies of two of the most important
sources (Kline and Culotta, The Postwar Freight Car Fleet;
Hendrickson, Focus on Freight Cars, Vol. 1) haven't arrived yet. I
think I have reached a point of diminishing returns, however - it now
often takes one or two hours of digging to classify just a few
hundred more cars. Therefore, I would like to enlist the aid of the
members of this list.

I will be most appreciative if you can provide me information on the
following car series. Most important is whether the cars are DS, SS,
steel (or steel rebuild), or "other" (if "other", what?). If in
addition you can provide the date when built (and rebuilt, if
appropriate), that would be great! Further information such as
class, sub-category (e.g., "Fowler" or "Ribside") would be nice, but
is not necessary. Of course, references to photographs would be
wonderful. The classification should reflect the status of the
series as of July, 1950. If these cars can be classified, the number
of unknowns will be cut in half and over 98% of the fleet will be
categorized.

Thanks in advance!

Larry Ostresh
Laramie, Wyoming

Road, AAR, Kind, Series, IL, Door, Capy, Qty
ATSF, XAR, Auto, 6751-6999, 50'6", 15'0", 100000, 238
ATSF, XM, Box, 8500-8999, 50'6", 15'6", 100000, 497
ATSF, XMR, AL, 9200-9455, 50'6", 15'0", 72000, 256
ATSF, XMR, AL, 63000-63254, 40'6", 12'6", 80000, 249
ATSF, XM, Box, 63751-64161, 40'6", 12'0", 80000, 210
CNW, XM, Box, 63000-64898, 40'6", 6'0", 80000, 515
CNW, XM, Box, 74900-76898, 40'6", 6'0", 80000, 971
CNW, XM, Box, 111000-111998, 40'6", 10'0", 80000, 482
CNW, XMR, Auto, 54000-54798, 40'6", 12'0", 80000, 393
CG, XM, Box, 40300-40699, 39'10", 6'0", 80000, 351
GM&O, XM, Box, 20000-20249, 40'6", 6'0", 100000, 245
GTW, XAP, Auto, 572100-572399, 40'6", 6'0", 80000, 242
GTW, XM, Box, 575000-575999, 40'6", 12'0", 90000, 468
GTW, XMR, Auto, 586500-586999, 40'6", 12'0", 80000, 301
IC, XM, Box, 15500-15796, 40'2", 6'0", 80000, 291
IC, XM, Box, 25000-25499, 40'3", 6'0", 80000, 258
IC, XM, Box, 25500-25999, 40'6", 6'0", 80000, 264
IC, XM, Box, 37500-37993, 40'6", 10'0", 80000, 486
IC, XM, Box, 40250-40499, 50'5", 12'0", 75000, 242
L&N, XM, Box, 13500-13999, 40'6", 6'0", 100000, 244
L&N, XM, Box, 48700-48949, 40'6", 10'0", 100000, 243
MEC, XM, Box, 35301-35650, 40'6", 6'0", 80000, 243
MILW, XAR, Auto, 9000-9499, 40'6", 15'0", 80000, 498
MILW, XM, Box, 15500-15749, 50'6", 15'0", 100000, 248
MP, XM, Box, 44000-44410, 40'4", 6'0", 80000, 408
MP, XM, Box, 44500-44788, 40'4", 6'0", 80000, 281
MP, XM, Box, 45251-45494, 40'3", 6'0", 80000, 239
MP, XAR, Auto, 75280-75479, 40'6", 12'1", 80000, 200
MP, XAR, Auto, 75480-75999, 40'6", 12'1", 80000, 338
MP, XAR, Auto, 76150-76999, 40'6", 12'1", 80000, 308
MP, XAR, Auto, 88500-88803, 50'6", 14'7", 100000, 302
SB&M, XM, Box, 20051-20550, 40'0", 6'0", 80000, 384
N&W, XM, Box, 40000-40603, 40'6", 6'0", 100000, 594
PM , XM, Box, 88000-88349, 40'6", 6'0", 80000, 229
RI, XMR, Auto, 159250-159899, 40'6", 14'6", 80000, 361
RI, XM, Box, 160250-160599, 40'6", 12'0", 80000, 334
SOO, XM, Box, 175000-175498, 50'0", 12'6", 100000, 246
SOO, XM, Box, 175900-176498, 50'0", 12'6", 100000, 297
SOO, XM, Box, 44500-45098, 40'6", 6'0", 100000, 300
SOO, XM, Box, 136400-136798, 40'6", 6'0", 100000, 200
SP, XM, Box, 66175-66674, 40'6", 10'7", 100000, 428
T&P, XM, Box, 30000-30316, 40'6", 6'0", 80000, 312


Re: Accurail Gon and P1K/NERS Dominion Boxcars (was Intermountain endorsement)

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Richard Hendrickson wrote:
. . . the "war emergency" composite version of the design, which was built for the NYC, ACL, Wabash, and (after the war) the SP, and probably some others that I'm forgetting.
That would be the T&NO, and yes, they did buy some after the war, but the first of the T&NO classes of those cars were built in 1944, which last time I checked was during the hostilities. <g>

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Mainline Modeler ?????

tmolsen@...
 

List,

Sorry guys, forgot to sign that answer regarding Mainline Modeler magazine and what it will take to buy it!

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu


Re: Accurail Gon and P1K/NERS Dominion Boxcars (was Intermountain endorsement)

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 1, 2007, at 4:33 AM, Garth G. Groff wrote:

Were there any other roads not on the Accurail list that had AAR 41'
gondolas?
Not that I'm aware of, with one odd exception ; more on that later. The 41' gondolas were the least popular of the WW-II era AAR recommended-practice designs; actually, I believe fewer cars were built for fewer RRs to this design than to the "war emergency" composite version of the design, which was built for the NYC, ACL, Wabash, and (after the war) the SP, and probably some others that I'm forgetting.

Thanks to other contributors (including Dennis himself), we now know that the model won't accurately represent the C&NW prototype cars, though it will certainly be close; that the P&WV cars had postwar improved Dreadnaught ends; and that the (short-lived) D&RGW cars had PSC rectangular-rib ends. That leaves just the ACL and GM&O versions.

The one odd exception, which I discovered in paging through my gondola photo albums, was built by AC&F in 10-49 for the U. S. government. The builder's photo (which was kindly supplied to me by Gene Green) shows a car lettered USNX 3800. The car in the photo is lettered as though it were intended for interchange service, but that USNX number series is shown in the ORERs I have as belonging to box cars, and there are no entries for gondolas of any kind. So where the car went after AC&F built it, and whether there were others like it, is a mystery.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Mainline Modeler ?????

tmolsen@...
 

Schuyler,

There is one big problem for anyone taking over the Mainline Modeler. Bob Hundman wants to sell it with the stipulation that whoever buys it has to honor all the present paid subscriptions, in addition to the purchase price. That is quite a stretch because a lot of people (including yours truly) had renewed for another year shortly before he folded the magazine in addition to those that renewed earlier.

He had asked Ted Culotta if he would buy it and take it over, but that would have meant that by honoring the outstanding subscriptions, there would be no income for quite an extensive period of time. For that reason, Ted turned him down and that that is why no one else has stepped forward to buy the magazine.

So that is the caveat: know anyone who is a philanthropist?


Re: Drawings and accuracy was Re: Mainline Modeler ?????

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Third and most important is that the original draftsmen
weren't immune from
human error. I'm presently trying to reconcile a cross
section with the
dimensions extracted from the side elevation and there is a
difference of
several inches in the placement of some important components. These
differences are big enough that they can't be explained by
distortion in the
scanned drawings.

Aidrian

I did drawings of an ERIE steam locomotive. It was very late one night when I was checking
dimensions to be sure that everything was what it should be when I came up against an error of a
couple of inches. It was pushing 3 AM (and I had to work the next day .. . ) when I came to
understand that the original draftsman had made an error; he'd drawn the boiler 3" too high above
the frame. With CAD, it was maybe 30 seconds work to correct it. But it took me hours to
understand it.

I also made artwork for a t-shirt by taking a drawing for a turntable and making the full circle
plan image of it. Of course, the original drafter had only drawn about 55% of the plan and
elevation, the rest was simply understood to be mirror image. But when I flipped the image to get
the other half, something was wrong. 98 years after the fact, I found his drawing error, wherein he
had put the centerline of the table 12" too far away from the end he'd drawn.

SGL


Re: questions for Ted Culotta

W.R.Dixon
 

pierreoliver2003 wrote:
The CN Fowlers have been photographed on Arch-bar trucks, "Bettendorf"
style, as well as "Simplex Bolster" trucks. Life-Like was offering
Simplex Bolster trucks, but a recent attempt by my local hobby shop to
order some from Walthers meet with failure.
I believe that the Simplex truck was a Life-Like Canada product and thus is now a Trueline Trains product and thus is not available from Walthers under the P2K name.

Bill Dixon


Re: Mainline Modeler ?????

David Powell <daveydiesel@...>
 

SGL.
Lets all hope this comes about and if it does lets support the effort
if it is all he claims it will be. Dave Powell Iowa

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Schuyler Larrabee
Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2007 10:45 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Mainline Modeler ?????

I do know one publisher of model and railroad magazines who is fairly
interested in acquiring the
magazine, and carrying it on with an even better quality of production.
One hopes that the articles
would revert to the quality that marked the magazine in the first few
years. That would be the
desire of the publisher I know.

SGL


--
No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.5.432 / Virus Database: 268.17.19/663 - Release Date:
2/1/2007 2:28 PM


--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.5.432 / Virus Database: 268.17.19/663 - Release Date:
2/1/2007 2:28 PM


Re: Mainline Modeler ?????

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I do know one publisher of model and railroad magazines who is fairly interested in acquiring the
magazine, and carrying it on with an even better quality of production. One hopes that the articles
would revert to the quality that marked the magazine in the first few years. That would be the
desire of the publisher I know.

SGL


Re: How is the AB brake cylinder mounted on the PRR G-22 gondola?

Bruce Smith
 

On Thu, February 1, 2007 7:26 pm, proto48er wrote:
It is a photo of the pilot model - will probably be corrected before
the final run. The rod between the two brake levers should be
between the centersills, and the live levers to the trucks should be
on the opposite side of the centersill from the brake cylinder,
IMHO.
And that would be incorrect. Standard PRR brake gear of that era had the
ends of the levers and the brake rods to the trucks between the
centersills and rod between the levers outside the center sill. That part
of the Koh's model appears to be correct.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, Al


Re: CNW Riveted PS-1s?

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Brian J Carlson

Kurt: BLT is Branchline trains. Ed Hawkins covered these cars in RPC 1

----- Original Message -----

Thanks Brian. I have RP CYC 1 but I was wondering if anything better/easier than a kitbash came out in the 10 years since Ed wrote the article.

KL


Re: CNW Riveted PS-1s?

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

Kurt: BLT is Branchline trains. Ed Hawkins covered these cars in RPC 1
Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

----- Original Message -----
From: "Kurt Laughlin" <fleeta@verizon.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2007 10:21 PM
Subject: [STMFC] CNW Riveted PS-1s?


Hi:

Is there a suitable HO model of a riveted CNW 40-ft PS-1? (At least I
think these series are riveted: 6200-7398, 7400-10098, 86300-88298,
106600-108598. Corrections welcome.) In the archives I found the following
kitbash:

"Take PS-1 ends, roof, and underframe from Intermountain, [mate with a BLT
body] and create one of the riveted PS-1's of the C&NW."

Is this the only way to go? Who is BLT?

Thanks,
KL








Yahoo! Groups Links




CNW Riveted PS-1s?

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Hi:

Is there a suitable HO model of a riveted CNW 40-ft PS-1? (At least I think these series are riveted: 6200-7398, 7400-10098, 86300-88298, 106600-108598. Corrections welcome.) In the archives I found the following kitbash:

"Take PS-1 ends, roof, and underframe from Intermountain, [mate with a BLT body] and create one of the riveted PS-1's of the C&NW."

Is this the only way to go? Who is BLT?

Thanks,
KL


Re: Drawings and accuracy was Re: Mainline Modeler ?????

rfederle@...
 

What you say is true. Having had the shipyard experience I can say that drawings are made and that does not necessarily mean they will be followed. They try but as obstacle arise parts must be repositioned to suit. Hopefully the draftsman will follow behind and redraw "As Builts" to reflect the modifications. Sometimes this is not possible.

So, if you had original drawing for a particular piece of equipment that does not mean that equipment will match that drawing exactly (and it probably wont). If these people are making drawings, we should be happy they are doing so. I am sure they are doing the best they can with the information they have at hand.

Robert Federle
---- Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton <smokeandsteam@san.rr.com> wrote:


I don’t want to make this a personality issue but in defence of Bob and
draftsmen worldwide I though I would add a few comments. I have also
commented on some mistakes in drawings in the past so please don’t feel that
I am singling anyone out for criticism.

As pleasing to the eye as they undoubtedly
were, it really isn't asking too much to expect them to be accurate.<<

"Accuracy" is quite a lot to ask in some cases depending on how much
accuracy you want and on what sources you have available; if you have ever
tried to produce a drawing from an old wrinkled, stained and faded set of
general arrangement drawings, equipment diagrams and lots of photos you’ll
appreciate the challenge. Like sailing ship modellers and historians we are
sometime faced with a reconstruction process rather than a simple technical
drawing exercise, and some of this means that we have to use judgment when
the known facts fail us. If you are drawing a freight car where you have
just a diagram and a handful of photos the problem is much worse.

CAD has an inherent level of accuracy which no pencil and paper based system
can ever match. For example I am working on a set of drawings for a
particular steam loco, based on builders G.As. There are several immediate
difficulties: -

A combination of aging aperture cards, the scanning process to get these
made into digital images and the natural instability of the original paper
drawings have resulted in lines that should be straight and square being
neither. Essentially these drawings are a guide to the correct position,
shape and size of the components, but there's a margin of error in their
scaled measurements which exceeds that accepted in the shop where the loco
was built. (The mechanics and craftsmen building the prototype would have
been given all the dimensions they needed and told in no uncertain terms "do
not scale". We're forced to scale from the drawings in the absence of all
but a few measurements; the problem then becomes do we take the measurement
from the top, middle or bottom of the lines since on the original drawings
theoretically parallel lines are usually no longer truly parallel after 80
or 90 years mouldering in a drawer.)

A General Arrangement is just that and many details on these are either
sketchy or (to be charitable) just representative. To provide definitive
drawings I would need access to the component drawings or perhaps the
original patterns and these are long gone in most cases. What I do know is
some of the common practices employed by the builders of these engines and
can incorporate what I know into the drawing. That may or may not be what
was actually done, but one way to find out is to publish the drawing and
wait for the evidence to roll in showing where I was wrong. Requesting
feedback during the process helps if you have willing, interested and
knowledgeable people to question as the drawings go together, but sometimes
you won’t get useful feedback until they are published.

Third and most important is that the original draftsmen weren't immune from
human error. I'm presently trying to reconcile a cross section with the
dimensions extracted from the side elevation and there is a difference of
several inches in the placement of some important components. These
differences are big enough that they can’t be explained by distortion in the
scanned drawings.

Aidrian

--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.5.432 / Virus Database: 268.17.12/653 - Release Date: 1/26/2007
11:11 AM





Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: questions for Ted Culotta

tmolsen@...
 

Pierre and List,

I bought a dozen pair of the Life-Like of Canada Simplex Bolster trucks when they came out in the fall of 2004 from Canadian Model Trains Inc. in Mississauga, Ontario.

The part number at that time was 433-212560 and the description was as follows: LL Proto [1938 AAR Trucks With Simplex Bolsters (PR)] [Used On Rolling Stock from 1938 To Date In Canada & The USA]

If the group's archives go back to about that time there was a long discussion regarding these trucks and their suitability for use with the various versions of the Fowler and dominion cars.

You may try them to see if they are still available. CMT's number is 1-866-862-7277 and ask for Steve. I have just bought Sylvan kits and the Canadian Rolling Stock Series soft-cover books from them.

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu


Drawings and accuracy was Re: Mainline Modeler ?????

Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton <smokeandsteam@...>
 

I don’t want to make this a personality issue but in defence of Bob and
draftsmen worldwide I though I would add a few comments. I have also
commented on some mistakes in drawings in the past so please don’t feel that
I am singling anyone out for criticism.

As pleasing to the eye as they undoubtedly
were, it really isn't asking too much to expect them to be accurate.<<

"Accuracy" is quite a lot to ask in some cases depending on how much
accuracy you want and on what sources you have available; if you have ever
tried to produce a drawing from an old wrinkled, stained and faded set of
general arrangement drawings, equipment diagrams and lots of photos you’ll
appreciate the challenge. Like sailing ship modellers and historians we are
sometime faced with a reconstruction process rather than a simple technical
drawing exercise, and some of this means that we have to use judgment when
the known facts fail us. If you are drawing a freight car where you have
just a diagram and a handful of photos the problem is much worse.

CAD has an inherent level of accuracy which no pencil and paper based system
can ever match. For example I am working on a set of drawings for a
particular steam loco, based on builders G.As. There are several immediate
difficulties: -

A combination of aging aperture cards, the scanning process to get these
made into digital images and the natural instability of the original paper
drawings have resulted in lines that should be straight and square being
neither. Essentially these drawings are a guide to the correct position,
shape and size of the components, but there's a margin of error in their
scaled measurements which exceeds that accepted in the shop where the loco
was built. (The mechanics and craftsmen building the prototype would have
been given all the dimensions they needed and told in no uncertain terms "do
not scale". We're forced to scale from the drawings in the absence of all
but a few measurements; the problem then becomes do we take the measurement
from the top, middle or bottom of the lines since on the original drawings
theoretically parallel lines are usually no longer truly parallel after 80
or 90 years mouldering in a drawer.)

A General Arrangement is just that and many details on these are either
sketchy or (to be charitable) just representative. To provide definitive
drawings I would need access to the component drawings or perhaps the
original patterns and these are long gone in most cases. What I do know is
some of the common practices employed by the builders of these engines and
can incorporate what I know into the drawing. That may or may not be what
was actually done, but one way to find out is to publish the drawing and
wait for the evidence to roll in showing where I was wrong. Requesting
feedback during the process helps if you have willing, interested and
knowledgeable people to question as the drawings go together, but sometimes
you won’t get useful feedback until they are published.

Third and most important is that the original draftsmen weren't immune from
human error. I'm presently trying to reconcile a cross section with the
dimensions extracted from the side elevation and there is a difference of
several inches in the placement of some important components. These
differences are big enough that they can’t be explained by distortion in the
scanned drawings.

Aidrian

--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.5.432 / Virus Database: 268.17.12/653 - Release Date: 1/26/2007
11:11 AM


Re: How is the AB brake cylinder mounted on the PRR G-22 gondola?

proto48er
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
wrote:

That's gotta be wrong.
Richard - I agree! Here is the entire link to the photo of the model:

http://www.kohs.com/PRR%20G22b%20pages/G22b%205sample%20model%20photo%
2008.html

It is a photo of the pilot model - will probably be corrected before
the final run. The rod between the two brake levers should be
between the centersills, and the live levers to the trucks should be
on the opposite side of the centersill from the brake cylinder,
IMHO.

I have the PRRH&TS "Keystone" from 1983 or so with the general
arrangement drawings of the cars, but no placement of brake gear is
indicated. Since the Kohs models are only available with containers,
and since they are $650 each(!), I am going to build up a couple from
brass kits made by the late Bob Parri.

In a related question, has anyone ever located a photo of the elusive
PRR G-21 gondola? Bob made me a kit for that car also, but we did
not know where to put the drop-type stake pockets inside the car. I
have to add the rivets to the sides of that car in the proper places
before assembling it.

Thanks again for the help. I love this list! A.T. Kott


Re: How long did Frisco's USRA Boxcars last with wood sides?

Charlie Duckworth <trduck@...>
 

Charlie, sorry to be slow in responding. I have a photo of wood
sheathed SL-SF 127750 reweighed 6-51, and that car, as well as 221
others, are still shown in the 1-53 ORER as being wood sheathed. So
at
least some of these cars would have lasted until 1954.

Richard Hendrickson
Richard - thanks! The Frisco car will soon be in service on the
Bagnell Branch.

Charlie

123821 - 123840 of 183396