Date   

The DS/SS split - More results

laramielarry <ostresh@...>
 

Hi Folks

Here is a list of the top 20 RRs in my database, in terms of number
of cars. The database consists of all type X and V cars, so as to
coincide with the recapitulation lists in the ORER. Thus, it may not
agree with other lists posted by members of this group - even the
order of railroads may differ.

Road .....Number
PRR.......65,651
NYC.......64,151
ATSF......34,869
MILW......31,971
B&O.......28,260
SP........27,176
SOUTHERN..25,347
UP........23,362
CNW.......23,187
GN........22,300
CB&Q......21,467
IC........20,868
NP........19,554
MP........18,028
RI........18,024
C&O.......14,437
ACL.......13,770
SLSF......13,147
L&N.......12,713
SEABOARD..12,369

For many of these I have enough information so that presenting the
preliminary classification of cars into DS, SS, and steel may be
warranted. Some of these results were posted earlier, but I'll do so
again so as to proffer a coherent list.

PRR . . . . %. . .Number
DS . . . . 0.0%. . .0
SS . . . .9.5%. . .6,238
Steel. . .90.1%. . .59,162
Other. . . 0.0%. . .0
Known. . 99.6%. . .65,400
Unknown. . 0.4%. . .251
Total. . 0.0%. . .65,651

NYC . . . . %. . .Number
DS . . . . 0.7%. . .430
SS . . . .0.6%. . .0,381
Steel. . .98.7%. . .63,295
Other. . . 0.0%. . .0
Known. . 99.9%. . .64,106
Unknown. . 0.1%. . .45
Total. . 0.0%. . .64,151

ATSF . . . . %. . .Number
DS . . . . 1.2%. . .405
SS . . . .21.6%. . .7,549
Steel. . .67.1%. . .23,412
Other. . . 7.9%. . .2755
Known. . 97.9%. . .34,121
Unknown. . 2.1%. . .748
Total. . 100.0%. . .34,869

MILW . . . . %. . .Number
DS . . . . 0.1%. . .28
SS . . . .53.9%. . .17,226
Steel. . .45.3%. . .14,493
Other. . . 0.0%. . .0
Known. . 99.3%. . .31,747
Unknown. . 0.7%. . .224
Total. . 100.0%. . .31,971

B&O . . . . %. . .Number
DS . . . . 8.6%. . .2438
SS . . . .1.6%. . .0,448
Steel. . .89.3%. . .25,238
Other. . . 0.0%. . .0
Known. . 99.5%. . .28,124
Unknown. . 0.5%. . .136
Total. . 100.0%. . .28,260

SP . . . . %. . .Number
DS . . . . 0.1%. . .20
SS . . . .26.8%. . .7,279
Steel. . .73.0%. . .19,845
Other. . . 0.0%. . .0
Known. . 99.9%. . .27,144
Unknown. . 0.1%. . .32
Total. . 100.0%. . .27,176

SOUTHERN . . . . %. . .Number
DS . . . . 28.6%. . .7248
SS . . . .0.0%. . .0,000
Steel. . .70.8%. . .17,946
Other. . . 0.0%. . .0
Known. . 99.4%. . .25,194
Unknown. . 0.6%. . .153
Total. . 100.0%. . .25,347

UP . . . . %. . .Number
DS . . . . 1.8%. . .412
SS . . . .0.0%. . .0,000
Steel. . .97.9%. . .22,870
Other. . . 0.0%. . .0
Known. . 99.7%. . .23,282
Unknown. . 0.3%. . .80
Total. . 100.0%. . .23,362

CNW - Insufficient data.

GN . . . . %. . .Number
DS . . . . 66.5%. . .14840
SS . . . .13.4%. . .2,998
Steel. . .11.2%. . .2,499
Other. . . 8.8%. . .1963
Known. . 100.0%. . .22,300
Unknown. . 0.0%. . .0
Total. . 100.0%. . .22,300

CB&Q . . . . %. . .Number
DS . . . . 0.8%. . .178
SS . . . .50.3%. . .10,805
Steel. . .48.0%. . .10,305
Other. . . 0.0%. . .0
Known. . 99.2%. . .21,288
Unknown. . 0.8%. . .179
Total. . 100.0%. . .21,467

IC - Insufficient data.

NP . . . . %. . .Number
DS . . . . 35.4%. . .6918
SS . . . .21.9%. . .4,279
Steel. . .41.8%. . .8,172
Other. . . 0.0%. . .0
Known. . 99.1%. . .19,369
Unknown. . 0.9%. . .185
Total. . 100.0%. . .19,554

MP - Insufficient data.

RI . . . . %. . .Number
DS . . . . 6.4%. . .1153
SS . . . .43.9%. . .7,914
Steel. . .47.5%. . .8,560
Other. . . 0.0%. . .0
Known. . 97.8%. . .17,627
Unknown. . 2.2%. . .397
Total. . 0.0%. . .18,024

C&O . . . . %. . .Number
DS . . . . 9.8%. . .1414
SS . . . .1.8%. . .0,262
Steel. . .87.1%. . .12,568
Other. . . 0.1%. . .10
Known. . 98.7%. . .14,254
Unknown. . 1.3%. . .183
Total. . 0.0%. . .14,437

ACL . . . . 0.0%. . .
DS . . . . 17.3%. . .2382
SS . . . .0.2%. . .0,022
Steel. . .82.5%. . .11,366
Other. . . 0.0%. . .0
Known. . 100.0%. . .13,770
Unknown. . 0.0%. . .0
Total. . 0.0%. . .13,770

SLSF - Insufficient data.

L&N - Insufficient data.

SEABOARD . . . . %. . .Number
DS . . . . 23.6%. . .2925
SS . . . .26.7%. . .3,304
Steel. . .48.8%. . .6,031
Other. . . 0.0%. . .0
Known. . 99.1%. . .12,260
Unknown. . 0.9%. . .109
Total. . 0.0%. . .12,369

Best wishes,
Larry Ostresh
Laramie, Wyoming


Re: Mainline Modeler ?????

cj riley <cjriley42@...>
 

--- Schuyler Larrabee <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

But those articles just got to be farther and farther apart.
The last one I recall
clearly was about five years ago, when a guy whose name I just can't quite
dredge up right now,
wrote an article about scratchbuilding a brass 0-6-0. Since I was (and still
The gentleman you are thinking of was Glen Farley of Seattle. I have seen his
L&N switcher many times and it is truly amazing.

CJ Riley




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Re: Kits? Yep...they're still with us

Schuyler Larrabee
 

"those Bowser locomotives didn't look THAT odd with Belpaire
boilers on your
free-lanced short line."

Fifty years ago those locomotives were Penn Line. They also
made 40' trailer
flats for them to pull.

Doug Brown
And the article about modifying two of them (Atlantic and ?Consolidation?) in MR was one of the
revalatory articles I read: You could CHANGE them into something else!!! WOW!!

They pulled steam era frt cars, obviously.

SGL


Re: Old Freight Kits versus New Kits

James Eckman
 

Some people were talking nostalgically about old craftsmen kits so I bought a couple to give them a try. I prefer scratchbuilding or resin kits after that experience! The older castings were much coarser and frankly the detail was none to great.

These are the good new days, even for us crazies who like early rail!

Jim Eckman


Re: Kits? Yep...they're still with us

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Doug Brown wrote:
Fifty years ago those locomotives were Penn Line. They also made 40' trailer
flats for them to pull.
You're absolutely right, Doug, and I remember mostly because they ran very well for their day.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Kits? Yep...they're still with us

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "Schuyler Larrabee" schuyler.larrabee@...

So, just how many of us are there? This list's home page says 1,244
members. Yet when I spoke with
John Engstrom at Springfield about the idea of undecorated versions of the
65' mill gon, he said
"There's only about 60 of you guys out there, you know."
----- Original Message -----

He might mean 60 people who would buy one. Gons are poor sellers from what I hear. There were only a bit more than 15,000 65-footers even in 1961 (compared to 102,000 50-footers and 96,000 40-footers) so they weren't all that common. (And of that 15,000, almost a quarter were PRR and over half were under PRR, RDG, P&LE, B&O, NYC, or ATSF markings.)

Besides, aren't pretty much all the accurate prototypes already covered by existing releases?

KL


Re: The DS/SS split - Thanks and an update

Brian Paul Ehni <behni@...>
 

Keep it coming, Larry!
--
Thanks!

Brian Ehni



From: laramielarry <ostresh@...>
Reply-To: <STMFC@...>
Date: Sat, 03 Feb 2007 21:16:37 -0000
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: The DS/SS split - Thanks and an update





--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , Anthony
Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:
Road, AAR, Kind, Series, IL, Door, Capy, Qty
SP, XM, Box, 66175-66674, 40'6", 10'7", 100000, 428
Class A-50-16, built in 1947, all-steel double doors (originally
500
cars).

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
Thanks Tony

Here is my tally for the SP with your data included:

SP . . . Percent . .Number
DS . . . . 0.1%. . . . .20
SS . . . .26.8%. . . 7,279
Steel. . .73.0%. . .19,845
Known. . .99.9%. . .27,144
Unknown. . 0.1%. . . . .32
Total. . 100.0%. . .27,176

Best wishes,
Larry


Re: Kits? Yep...they're still with us

Doug Brown <g.brown1@...>
 

"those Bowser locomotives didn't look THAT odd with Belpaire boilers on your
free-lanced short line."



Fifty years ago those locomotives were Penn Line. They also made 40' trailer
flats for them to pull.



Doug Brown

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
rfederle@...
Sent: Saturday, February 03, 2007 9:41 AM
To: STMFC@...
Cc: A. Premo
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Kits? Yep...they're still with us



And Armand, you forgot Quality Craft, Suydam and Penn Line to name a few
more.

Robert Federle
---- "A. Premo" <armprem@surfglobal. <mailto:armprem%40surfglobal.net> net>
wrote:
Tony,You forgot to mention Silver Streak , Central Valley ,Globe and
Mantua to name a few others.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
From: "Anthony Thompson" <thompson@signaturep
<mailto:thompson%40signaturepress.com> ress.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> com>
Sent: Saturday, February 03, 2007 1:25 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Kits? Yep...they're still with us


Another point worth making is that there really wasn't all that
much scratch building 50 years ago or so. You just made do with what
you could get. Layouts were full of Athearn and Ulrich metal cars,
Varney plastic, and some paper-side cars. You could visit layouts all
over the country and see the exact same freight cars (and structures
and passenger cars and . . . ) because anything else was far too much
trouble. Sure, some talented and energetic people were building great
models, but I'd guess there were no more of them then than now. And
what they built wouldn't be that impressive today. Just go back and
look at the magazine photos.
Layouts like Jack Burgess's YV were really inconceivable then.
Jack has had to scratch build an awful lot, but 50 years ago you
couldn't even get sheet styrene (nor would you have known what to do
with it), and the very first brass engines were just coming into view.
People thought Ambroid kits were "too hard," and hey, those Bowser
locomotives didn't look THAT odd with Belpaire boilers on your
free-lanced short line. And there was hardly any serious prototype
information being published; practically no modelers had discovered the
Cyc and other resources.
The progress to today is really qualitative, not just
quantitative. Richard Hendrickson is right when he says "THIS is the
golden age." When we have one of these discussion about where the hobby
is and where it's going, let's not forget where it's come from.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturep
<mailto:thompson%40signaturepress.com> ress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history




Yahoo! Groups Links





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Re: Kits? 50 + years ago.

Barry Roth
 

It was because of the "Dollar Cars" series that I got into scratchbuilding. The price was about right for a teenager, especially if I could get a couple of lawn mowing jobs on the weekend. In my mind's eye, the cars I managed to build then would look just fine today, running with my brass and resin items. Wish I still had 'em.

Barry Roth

"Edwin C. Kirstatter" <Q1xaMacArthur1@...> wrote:
[...]
And how many of those "Dollar Cars" did you build before
the advent of styrene? Could you do better now?


.





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Re: How is the AB brake cylinder mounted on the PRR G-22 gondola?

proto48er
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Bruce Smith" <smithbf@...> wrote:

A.T.,

This is the standard brake arrangement for PRR cars of this era. I
was
about to say that it had nothing to do with drop doors, but it may
well
have originated in that style car. Regardless, it was applied to
the GR
(and FM which is a twin to the GR), GRa and many other cars such as
the
X25 and X29. Similar brakes were used on the B&O M-26A.
Westerfield and
F&C have nice castings for the levers in their kits (note that the
Sunshine FM has a bogus brake arrangement drawing in the
instruction).

BTW, we just finished an FM project on the PRRPro group <G>.

Regards
Bruce
Bruce -

Thank you very much for the help! I just was having a hard time
believing the brake mount arrangement from an engineering
perspective! You are correct!

Glad you mentioned the B&O M-26a, since I have one of those waiting
to be corrected/detailed too! I am an "O" scaler, so the only
recourse we have is to PSC brass parts - these are all brass cars.

I have a goofy project in mind. I am going to convert one of the
brass Hallmark GRa gondolas into a GR in a crazy way. I have two
brass FM flatcars - one will be used with the cut-down sides from a
GRa to make a GR gon. The rest of the GRa car will become an FGRa
flatcar with new floor and stake pockets from the FM. According to
the drawings, things line up pretty well. I am still looking for a
photo of the FGRa, however. That is a request for another day!!

Joined the PRRPro group just after the FM project, but they got into
structures, etc. Now I am interested in the Pullman heavyweights
project when that comes along.

Thanks again! A.T. Kott


Re: How is the AB brake cylinder mounted on the PRR G22 gondola?

proto48er
 

Ben -

Thank you very much for all the information on the mounting of the
brake cylinder for those PRR classes! That is really interesting. I
am an engineer, and it just did not seem like the longitudinal plate
mounted on two otherwise unremarkable crossmembers would be strong
enough to mount a brake cylinder. Also seems that checking for
dragging or disconnected brake equipment would be more difficult with
the rods to the trucks between the centersill!

Yes, I have a copy of the Keystone Modeler from 10/2003 with the GRa
drawings - there is just so much information out there that I did not
recall it! You are very correct about the mounting!

That X23 photo sure does show a similar mounting, but it looks like
that plate is attached to the side sill too. This may show up as a
couple of extra rivets along the side sill - will have to study some
photos! Ain't this hobby fun!

Thanks again for all the help!

A.T. Kott


Re: The DS/SS split - Thanks and an update

laramielarry <ostresh@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:
Road, AAR, Kind, Series, IL, Door, Capy, Qty
SP, XM, Box, 66175-66674, 40'6", 10'7", 100000, 428
Class A-50-16, built in 1947, all-steel double doors (originally
500
cars).

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
Thanks Tony

Here is my tally for the SP with your data included:

SP . . . Percent . .Number
DS . . . . 0.1%. . . . .20
SS . . . .26.8%. . . 7,279
Steel. . .73.0%. . .19,845
Known. . .99.9%. . .27,144
Unknown. . 0.1%. . . . .32
Total. . 100.0%. . .27,176

Best wishes,
Larry


Re: How is the AB brake cylinder mounted on the PRR G-22 gondola?

proto48er
 

--- In STMFC@..., Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...> wrote:

AT Kott wrote:


Sorry - I am really a Mopac (I-GN) + M-K-T + T&NO type of guy! Mopac
always had a lot of PRR freight cars in the trains down in south
Texas...

What kinds of PRR Freight Cars were in South Texas, and in what
proportion of Total Boxcars? Total Gons? Total Hoppers? Total Stock
Cars? Total Flat Cars?

Tim Gilbert
Tim - I do not know the exact proportion of each type of PRR car, but
there were a considerable number of PRR boxcars, gondolas and flatcars
on the I-GN through freights from Austin to San Antonio in the late
1950's. The primary cars on the I-GN trains were MP boxcars, with PRR
boxcars next. There were very few NYC cars on MP trains, but they were
more common on M-K-T trains for some reason and there were very few PRR
cars on them. I was too young to understand or ask any of the
operating personnel why this traffic pattern existed - I doubt if any
knew, since we are a long way from St Louis where the brains of the
operation were. The only MP switch lists I have are OT (1961-1963).

Many shipments of steel and other mfg. goods were delivered on MP in
PRR gons. and on PRR flats (to a lesser extent). I have photos of
captive PRR GRa gons. used to haul cut limestone slabs from a quarry on
the T&NO Llano Branch to a facility in the city of Austin.

Surprisingly, there were PRR stock cars down here too. It appears that
the King Ranch in Kingsville, Texas (on the StLB&M) regularly shipped
cattle to and from Pennsylvania - they had some kind of fattening (?)
operation there.

There were very few PRR hopper cars here. Coal in south Texas was
shipped primarily in gondolas in the 1948 era of my interest. However,
I like the PRR H-21a and H-25 cars because they look very much like a
series of later-built MP quad hoppers which were everywhere down here
in the late 1950's. I saw a ton of the PRR cars when I lived in
Reading, Penna. in 1950-1951 also. These MP cars were built out of my
time frame, but the PRR hoppers are not an anachronism, so there they
are! I am the boss, so that is that! Out of 400+ cars, I do have (4)
H-21a's, (1)H-25, and (1)H-22a - even the paint and lettering on them
looks like the MP quad hoppers! Also, the top 24" of one of the PRR
GLc gons.(hoppers?) was cut off and it was used on the Midland Terminal
RR in Colorado Springs; when the MT went belly-up in 1947, it was sold
to a quarry in New Braunfels, Texas - so it is fair game too. Only
photo I have is as an MT car. ORER dimensions indicate it was a PRR
GLc, and not a UP or B&O car.

We did see a number of hoppers of coke, used by one of the local
foundrys - also a roofless boxcar or two (L&N) in that service. Have
been fighting the thought of converting an H-22a into an H-22 coke car -
one lone car was left on the PRR roster until about 1952.

Some MP trains had solid blocks of ART reefers in them. Some had large
blocks of MP gondolas and/or MP covered hoppers in them. Very few
AT&SF cars were down here on MP or M-K-T or SP - just an occasional
boxcar or reefer. Some surprising cars came through regularly on the
MP - like B&O wagon-top covered hoppers with catalytic cracking
catalyst for the FCCU's at the Corpus Christi refineries - all sent
down the SAU&G (MP) line south of San Antonio. Also an occasional
brick container car with special firebrick for the refineries (did not
ever see one of these, however). Also L&NE covered hoppers down here
on MP.

In a typical MP freight of 1954, about 65% of the cars were MP, then
10% PRR, then 5% B&O and 5% SP - I saw lots of trains with this mix
over a 15 year period. MP trains consisted mostly of boxcars, with a
good percentage of gondolas and covered hoppers in them as well. M-K-T
had more of a mix, with only 30% or so of M-K-T cars per train - mostly
boxcars.

A.T. Kott


The DS/SS split - Some data

laramielarry <ostresh@...>
 

Hi Folks

Here are the distributions of double sheathed, single sheathed and
steel box and auto cars for several RRs as of July, 1950. I'll post
more later.

ATSF . . Percent . .Number
DS . . . . 1.2%. . . . 405
SS . . . .21.6%. . . 7,549
Steel. . .67.1%. . .23,412
"Panel". . 7.9%. . . 2,755
Known. . 97.9%. . . 34,121
Unknown. . 2.1%. . . . 748
Total. . 100.0%. . .34,869
With nearly 98% of the fleet tallied, steel is about 2/3 of the Santa
Fe fleet; DS is miniscule and is almost entirely 36' cars - unless
one chooses to count the "panel" cars as DS, which the ORER does.

MILW . . Percent . .Number
DS . . . . 0.1%. . . . .28
SS . . . .53.9%. . .17,226
Steel. . .45.3%. . .14,493
Known. . 99.3%. . . 31,747
Unknown. . 0.7%. . . . 224
Total. . 100.0%. . .31,971
Over 99% of the Milwaukee fleet is categorized, and single sheathed
cars have a bit of an edge over steel; DS is negligible.

N&W . . Percent . .Number
DS . . . . 1.1%. . . .101
SS . . . .10.5%. . . .943
Steel. . .88.3%. . .7,900
Known. . 100.0%. . .8,944
All the box and auto cars on the Norfolk and Western are classified;
steel dominates (all that coal goes to produce something!).

RI . . Percent . . Number
DS . . . . 6.4%. . .1,153
SS . . . .43.9%. . .7,914
Steel. . .47.5%. . .8,560
Known. . 97.8%. . .17,627
Unknown. . 2.2%. . . .397
Total. . 0.0%. . . 18,024
Nearly 98% of the Rock Island cars are tallied; SS is close to steel,
but even if all the "Unknowns" go its way, it won't win the race.

Soo . . Percent . .Number
DS . . . . 3.7%. . . .344
SS . . . .60.6%. . .5,630
Steel. . .28.3%. . .2,626
Known. . 92.5%. . . 8,600
Unknown. . 7.5%. . . .694
Total. . 100.0%. . .9,294
SS wins big on the Soo, however, regardless of how the "Unknowns"
fall. This would be a great line to model if you want to escape the
blandness of the flat-sides.

I post these results with some trepidation, as is possible - maybe
even likely - that I made some major errors in classification. If
so, please know that I WOULD like to be informed of the problems, so
that I can correct them.

Best wishes,
Larry Ostresh
Laramie, Wyoming


Re: Kits? Yep...they're still with us

rfederle@...
 

I have a couple Silver Streak kits on the shelf awaiting construction. Maybe someday.

Robert Federle
---- Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Armand Premo wrote:
Tony,You forgot to mention Silver Streak , Central Valley ,Globe
and Mantua to name a few others.
There was no intention to provide a complete history of HO kits
<g>, just choosing a couple of examples. Speaking just for me, I loved
Silver Streak kits in those days.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: The DS/SS split - Thanks and an update

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

I will be most appreciative if you can provide me information on the
following car series . . .

Road, AAR, Kind, Series, IL, Door, Capy, Qty
SP, XM, Box, 66175-66674, 40'6", 10'7", 100000, 428
Class A-50-16, built in 1947, all-steel double doors (originally 500 cars).

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Kits? Yep...they're still with us

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Armand Premo wrote:
Tony,You forgot to mention Silver Streak , Central Valley ,Globe and Mantua to name a few others.
There was no intention to provide a complete history of HO kits <g>, just choosing a couple of examples. Speaking just for me, I loved Silver Streak kits in those days.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Kits? Yep...they're still with us

George Hollwedel <georgeloop@...>
 

What is John's e-mail address?

Prototype N Scale Models
by George Hollwedel
proto.nscale@...
310 Loma Verde Street
Buda, TX 78610-9785
512-796-6883

----- Original Message -----
From: "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Saturday, February 03, 2007 1:53 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Kits? Yep...they're still with us



Anthony Thompson:
Sure, some talented and energetic people were building great
models, but I'd guess there were no more of them then than now.
So, just how many of us are there? This list's home page says 1,244 members. Yet when I spoke with
John Engstrom at Springfield about the idea of undecorated versions of the 65' mill gon, he said
"There's only about 60 of you guys out there, you know."

Y'know, I think he's wrong. But that's what he thinks.

Now, I know that there are probably a lot of guys on this list (are there ANY women?) who simply
want to know more about when a car was built, who built them, the kind of car they are, the era
they're appropriate for, how long they lasted and that's about it. There's another subset that want
to know precisely what kind of end they have, what brake gear they have, the kind of roof walk, and
so on. And then there are those who want to know exactly how many rivets, and what size they were,
on some specific tank car.

But I'm absolutely sure that there are more, way more, than "60 of you guys out there."

There's power in numbers, and if we want kits, we have to make sure that Athearn (and BLI, IM, and
the others) know that there's more than 60 of us.

SGL




Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: Kits? Yep...they're still with us

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Anthony Thompson:
Sure, some talented and energetic people were building great
models, but I'd guess there were no more of them then than now.
So, just how many of us are there? This list's home page says 1,244 members. Yet when I spoke with
John Engstrom at Springfield about the idea of undecorated versions of the 65' mill gon, he said
"There's only about 60 of you guys out there, you know."

Y'know, I think he's wrong. But that's what he thinks.

Now, I know that there are probably a lot of guys on this list (are there ANY women?) who simply
want to know more about when a car was built, who built them, the kind of car they are, the era
they're appropriate for, how long they lasted and that's about it. There's another subset that want
to know precisely what kind of end they have, what brake gear they have, the kind of roof walk, and
so on. And then there are those who want to know exactly how many rivets, and what size they were,
on some specific tank car.

But I'm absolutely sure that there are more, way more, than "60 of you guys out there."

There's power in numbers, and if we want kits, we have to make sure that Athearn (and BLI, IM, and
the others) know that there's more than 60 of us.

SGL


Will value of dollar and oil prices bring back kits?

colormydreams2 <LMP@...>
 

I watched an interesting financial show this morning where the guest
was talking about the trillions of dollars that we have in debt to
other nations is coming back to haunt us. Will the Chinese have so
many American dollars that we will start building kits for them? Will
$100 a barrel oil run up the cost of model cars that we will build our
own kits instead of shipping them overseas, assembling them then
shipping them back here? Will we have lost all our skills of assembly?
One O scaler who still sniffs glue,
Ken Towler

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