Date   

Re: P2K Mathers cars accuracy

Ray Breyer <rbreyer@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Hillman
One case in point. I impetuosly purchased Walthers, Proto 2000 Series;
Mather 40ft Stock Car, GM&O
Mather 40ft boxcar, C&IM
Mather 40ft Boxcar, C&EI
It was late, I'd had a couple of beers, I liked the way the cars
looked and assumed that PROBABLY (?) the manufacturer had done their
prototype research duty. (Or "close" enough)
Now, I have to do some research, as to how close I'd come to
my "guess" at such accuracy.


Paul,

The GM&O Mathers car is wrong for your date of 1947. The Mathers cars on the
GM&O roster came from the Alton, which was absorbed in 1949. You need the
P2K Alton cars, which are decorated correct.

The C&IM car is completely screwed up. The cars are decorated with yellow
sides and black roofs and ends. The cars should correctly be painted with
orange sides and mineral red roof and ends. The lettering itself is correct.
I'm using them as-is for now, but will eventually try to "fix" the cars, by
repainting the black and attempting to "orange up" the sides with a wash and
lots of weathering.

Ray Breyer
Modeling the Peoria, IL, area circa 1949.


Re: Whats a 1913 "Barber" Truck?

Bob Karig <karig@...>
 

I believe that most people reading this discussion realize that (1) we have not been discussing Bettendorf T-section side frames but rather side frames with separable journal boxes, e.g., "Andrews" side frames, and (2) the same principle applies to side frames with separable journal boxes as Dr. Hendrickson made with Bettendorf side frames, that is, to label all side frames with separable journal boxes as "Andrews" is commiting the same sin as labeling all side frames with integral journal boxes as "Bettendorf."

This is the last that I plan to say on this matter.

Bob Karig

What Mr. Karig either fails to realize or wilfully ignores is that
the quotation from Mr. Hendrickson is about cast steel sideframes
generally, mislabeled by modelers as "Bettendorf," while the more
recent discussion on this list is about the original Bettendorf trucks,
with T-section sideframes. To confuse these two situations is either to
try and evade history, or to be unable to understand it. I leave it to
Mr. Karig to tell us which one it is.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705


Re: Mather Box Cars

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Paul & Bernice Hillman"
<chris_hillman@...> wrote:

On Feb 18, 2007, at 1:18 PM, Paul & Bernice Hillman wrote:
****************************************************************
Of course it's true that the car's build/rebuild date is highly
relevant to the period one's modelling and has to be considered when
purchasing, painting & building a model car.
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@> wrote:


... Standard practice was to paint over the old data
and stencil the new reweigh station symbol and date over it (as well
as new light weight and load limit, if those had changed) – unless,
of course, the entire car was in need of repainting.

Richard Hendrickson
Which makes re-weight dates a non-issue when buying model freightcars.
Since many, if not most, of the cars in service were running with the
station symbol and date applied over a patch of fresh and different
looking paint, simply paint over the existing date, or cover it with a
small rectangle cut from pre-painted decal sheet, and add the new info
with decals. The same procedure can be used with the journal repack
information usually stenciled over the right truck, which also was
changed periodically. Air brake equipment was also serviced
periodically and the date stenciled on the car, but as it was
stenciled on the reservoir, road grime on freightcars quickly hid it.

These periodic inspection dates are still applied to freightcars
today, but since the introduction of the black "consolidated stencil"
in the sixties, all the dates are stick-on numbers, and we no longer
see the painted patches behind the stenciled information.

Dennis


Re: CCBX 501

h8fan
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
wrote:

You can save yourself the trouble of looking for a prototype photo,
for
a couple of reasons. First, in design, dimensions, and details the
Model Power toy tank car isn't even close to ANY actual prototype
tank
cars. Second, what it vaguely resembles is a 10,000 gal. ICC-103,
but
CCBX is shown in the 1/53 ORER to have been a 10,200 gal. ICC-104 A
high pressure insulated acid tank and thus nothing even remotely
like
the Model Power tank car in appearance. Of course, the same P/L
scheme
may have been applied to other CCBX car, but Carbide & Carbon
Chemicals
Co.'s tank car fleet consisted almost entirely either of insulated
high
pressure acid cars or flat cars equipped for carrying separate
small
containers; in fact, in 1953 they owned exactly one 10,000 gal. ARA
III/ICC-103.

Richard Hendrickson
Thanks for the info Richard. I didn't really expect the Model Power
car to be a great model of a specific car. That same green and white
car has also been produced by Varney and Mantua/Tyco. I was more
interested in the green and white paint, if there are any photos of
the green and white Union Carbide cars, what they carried, when and
what Carbide plants they served.
Thanks agian.
Jim B.


Re: Whats a 1913 "Barber" Truck?

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Richard Hendrickson said in RP Cyc:
"...Many trucks made in the 1920s and almost all trucks from the 1930s
through 1950s had integral journal boxes but they were often quite
different from each other in many details of design and appearance. To
indiscriminately identify them as "Bettendorf" trucks is to obscure those
differences. The term "Bettendorf" should therefore be applied only to
trucks designed and/or built by the Bettendorf company (which ceased to
manufacture freight car trucks in 1942). Other trucks should be identifed
by design and builder, when possible..."
Bob Karig wrote:
Personally, I believe that the same principal recommended by this eminent
historian for trucks with cast-in journal boxes should also apply to side
frames with separable journal boxes, and that is what I have attempted to do.
What Mr. Karig either fails to realize or wilfully ignores is that the quotation from Mr. Hendrickson is about cast steel sideframes generally, mislabeled by modelers as "Bettendorf," while the more recent discussion on this list is about the original Bettendorf trucks, with T-section sideframes. To confuse these two situations is either to try and evade history, or to be unable to understand it. I leave it to Mr. Karig to tell us which one it is.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Whats a 1913 "Barber" Truck?

Bob Karig <karig@...>
 

The only way that I can respond to this comment is to quote from a section
labeled "Bettendorf Trucks" in an article entitled "Freight Car Trucks"
published in Railway Prototype Cyclopedia, Volume 4.

"...Many trucks made in the 1920s and almost all trucks from the 1930s
through 1950s had integral journal boxes but they were often quite
different from each other in many details of design and appearance. To
indiscriminately identify them as "Bettendorf" trucks is to obscure those
differences. The term "Bettendorf" should therefore be applied only to
trucks designed and/or built by the Bettendorf company (which ceased to
manufacture freight car trucks in 1942). Other trucks should be identifed
by design and builder, when possible..."

Personally, I believe that the same principal recommended by this eminent
historian for trucks with cast-in journal boxes should also apply to side
frames with separable journal boxes, and that is what I have attempted to do.

This discussion began with a question about Barber trucks. I am sure that
all would agree that the Barber side frame used by the Erie is
significantly different from the "Andrews" side frame produced by American
Steel Foundries. To identify the Erie trucks in no greater detail than
having "Andrews" side frames would "obsure those differences." For this
reason, I cannot help but stand foursquare in agreement with the author of
the remarks that I've quoted above.

Bob Karig

Nice, and useful, photos. However, you still seem to be laboring under
some confusion about Andrews trucks. The trucks identified as Gould
and Buckeye are, in fact, both Andrews trucks manufactured by the Gould
Coupler Co. and the Buckeye Steel Castings Co. ASF developed and
patented the Andrews design before the turn of the century, and the
patents covered any truck with bolted-in journal boxes and bar steel
lower journal box locator/retainers. However, ASF licensed the design
to other truck manufacturers, and almost every truck manufacturer built
several different variants of the Andrews truck between the turn of the
century and the late 1920s. The Wolff truck also incorporated the main
features of the Andrews design and may have been built under license,
though the side frames were obviously unique in configuration. As Tony
Thompson has already pointed out, the Bettendorf T-section truck, which
pioneered the principle of journal boxes cast integral with the side
frames, was also built under license by a number of other truck
manufacturers than Bettendorf, and the same was true of ASF's Vulcan
design in which cast steel side frames enclosed separate journal boxes
in pedestal jaws. The DESIGNS are correctly identified as Andrews,
Bettendorf, or Vulcan regardless of who cast the side frames or built
the trucks.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: More on Hutchins ends

destron@...
 

Thank you for this information, much new and useful data there!

Now what would be interesting is to find out what happened to the 15 that
weren't sold to the AC&Y.

Regards, Frank

I've just posted two photos on STMFC... one shows the tapered Hutchins
ends on AC&Y Stores Car #4... one of 150 ex-P&N autoboxes acquired in
1939 which became the AC&Y 2000-series, roster mainstays until the late
60's in tire service. Pressed Steel built the P&N 24,000-series in
September 1925, but 15 identical cars were also home-built by P&N.
Drawings or builder's photos for the P&N 24000-series have yet to
surface. I understand the cars conform to the ARA 1924 standard,
employing the Pratt truss design (forming a "W"). All 165 cars were 50-
ton, 2926 cubic-foot capacity riding on Bettendorf U-section trucks.
The 5' truck center (king pin) location, like the X-29 and another
spotting feature, places the lead edge of the wheel almost at the end
of the car. The Hutchins ends and dry-lading roof, separate ladders,
8'6" interior height and 1�-doors gave them a distinctive appearance.
A second photo from Tom Fetters is Piedmont & Northern publicity
photo. P&N freight motor No. 5602 poses near Greenville with a full
train of newer single-sheathed boxcars. The first three are the P&N
12000-series single-door cars, but thereafter are the P&N 24000-series
1�-door auto cars later acquired by the AC&Y. Bob Lucas




Yahoo! Groups Links





!DSPAM:1291,45d65c5c25681227091903!


Re: USRA SS boxcars, and roofs

destron@...
 

All of the single sheathed box cars built for the USRA had Murphy
flexible metal XLA roofs, though these were sometimes replaced with all
steel roofs of various types in later years. Some of the postwar USRA
clones ordered by individual railroads (e.g., Wabash) had other roofs,
of course. Doors and ends were also the same on all USRA cars though,
again, steel doors sometimes replaced the original wood doors after the
cars had been in service for a long time. Don't confuse the many
single sheathed box cars built to other designs during the 1920s with
USRA cars, e.g. the Ann Arbor 73750 series noted above; though a lot of
them bore a superficial resemblance to USRA cars, they were in fact
quite different.
Ah, yes. I've actually noticed this, but i was rather unclear with my
intent. What I meant is, a list of 9-panel Howe Truss cars. Since these
are superficially quite similar to each other, I figured a list which
included the USRA cars could be useful from a modelling point of view. For
now I don't want to concern myself with other truss and panel
arrangements, just the 9-panel Howe...

Regards, Frank


Vulcan and other ends, etc.

destron@...
 

elusive and short lived Vulcan end.
<snip>
potential patent. It didn't stay on the market long, but some were
applied to cars built for a few roads.
Do you know who else used these, and for how long? Any ideas as to whether
any were found on cars in interchange in 1952?

On a similar note, I'd be curious about the Van Dorn and the Deco. Who had
cars with these on them, and were they still interchanged in '52?


Recently, a new venture has started making CBC's with newly expired
Copyrights available on CD at a very reasonable price. See:

http://raildriver.com/

I've purchased the 1922 Car Builder's Cyclopedia and am very pleased.
<snip>
I think for $30 plus shipping, you'll find the answers to a lot of
your questions about the P&N freightcars.
I visited the site and went to order one, but they gave only one shipping
option to Canada, and that at $42. Having seen a friend's original copy of
a 1928 CBC, I now have a good idea of how useful having one will be, but
to pay such a high price for shipping - more than the cost of the product!
- ... no. I sent them an email to ask if they have any other shipping
possibilities. I don't need overnight UPS.

Regards,
Frank


Re: Mather Box Cars

Paul Hillman
 

Thanks Richard for that great input about Mather cars and their
markings. Didn't know about that info.

I'd just purchased your book today, "Focus on Freight Cars, Vol.I",
through Speedwitch, and am awaiting it's excellent detail content. I
Love SS/OSB freight cars and I can foretell, that I don't think I
will be disappointed.

Thanks again, Paul Hillman
***************************************************************

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
wrote:

On Feb 18, 2007, at 1:18 PM, Paul & Bernice Hillman wrote:
****************************************************************
Of course it's true that the car's build/rebuild date is highly
relevant to the period one's modelling and has to be considered when
purchasing, painting & building a model car.

To the bottom left of the car's side doors there's a date, IE) C.R.5-
43. What does that literally mean? I presume it's the rebuild date,
as "Car Rebuilt 5-43"
****************************************************************
No, that's a reweigh date. C.R. stood for Chicago Ridge, Mather's
main (and only) shop. Mather cars were sometimes reweighed and
restenciled by the lessors, or by some other RR if the car was
required by AAR rules to be reweighed when off-line, but cars leased
from Mather went back to Chicago Ridge periodically for maintenance
and repairs and were usually reweighed there if they were close to
coming due for reweighing. Since you model 1947, 5-43 is an obsolete
reweigh date; at that time, AAR rules required the reweighing of most
cars (except tank and live poultry cars) at 30 month intervals or
whenever repairs to the cars significantly changed their light weight
(e.g., truck or wheel replacement, replacement of K type air brakes
with AB equipment). Standard practice was to paint over the old data
and stencil the new reweigh station symbol and date over it (as well
as new light weight and load limit, if those had changed) – unless,
of course, the entire car was in need of repainting.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Mather Box Cars

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 18, 2007, at 1:18 PM, Paul & Bernice Hillman wrote:

Of course it's true that the car's build/rebuild date is highly
relevant to the period one's modelling and has to be considered when
purchasing, painting & building a model car.

To the bottom left of the car's side doors there's a date, IE) C.R.5-
43. What does that literally mean? I presume it's the rebuild date,
as "Car Rebuilt 5-43"?
No, that's a reweigh date. C.R. stood for Chicago Ridge, Mather's main
(and only) shop. Mather cars were sometimes reweighed and restenciled
by the lessors, or by some other RR if the car was required by AAR
rules to be reweighed when off-line, but cars leased from Mather went
back to Chicago Ridge periodically for maintenance and repairs and were
usually reweighed there if they were close to coming due for
reweighing. Since you model 1947, 5-43 is an obsolete reweigh date; at
that time, AAR rules required the reweighing of most cars (except tank
and live poultry cars) at 30 month intervals or whenever repairs to the cars significantly changed their light weight (e.g., truck or wheel
replacement, replacement of K type air brakes with AB equipment).
Standard practice was to paint over the old data and stencil the new
reweigh station symbol and date over it (as well as new light weight
and load limit, if those had changed) – unless, of course, the entire
car was in need of repainting.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: ACL/SAL Covered Hoppers on Wabash

al_brown03
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Allen Rueter <allen_282@...> wrote:

Al,

Thank you very much.



Correction on SAL 7040, should of been 7940 ( 7600-7999, P-S '52-
53.)



With fewer covered hoppers in 1950, would this traffic have been
shipped, bagged in box cars?



--

Allen Rueter StLouis MO
I don't know, but that would be my guess too. Like cement, fertilizer
is damaged by any water leakage into the car; so it would be an early
candidate for shipment in covered hoppers as they became available.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: Paint Match for P2K NYC and P&LE Greenville Gons

armprem
 

John Sir,Try Accupaint Rich Oxide Brown.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "John Golden" <golden1014@yahoo.com>
To: <stmfc@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, February 18, 2007 2:23 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Paint Match for P2K NYC and P&LE Greenville Gons


> Gentlemen,
>
> Does anyone know the paint match for the P2K NYC and
> P&LE Greenville gons--the as-delivered freight car
> brown paint? I have several that I have modified (with
> the correct ladders, etc. and can't seem to match with
> Scalecoat. Thanks for the help.
>
> John
>
>
> John Golden
> O'Fallon, IL
>
> http://www.pbase.com/golden1014
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> Version: 7.5.441 / Virus Database: 268.17.37/682 - Release Date: 2/12/2007 1:23 PM
>
>


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Re: Paint Match for P2K NYC and P&LE Greenville Gons

Scott Pitzer
 

I opened up my P&LE kit and put a drop of Accurail DARK Tuscan Oxide on
the underside... that's too dark (even after Dullcoating.)
And I can't seem to find my LIGHT Tuscan Oxide.
Scott Pitzer

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, John Golden <golden1014@...> wrote:

Gentlemen,

Does anyone know the paint match for the P2K NYC and
P&LE Greenville gons--the as-delivered freight car
brown paint? I have several that I have modified (with
the correct ladders, etc. and can't seem to match with
Scalecoat. Thanks for the help.

John


John Golden
O'Fallon, IL

http://www.pbase.com/golden1014


Re: ACL/SAL Covered Hoppers on Wabash

Allen Rueter
 

Al,

Thank you very much.



Correction on SAL 7040, should of been 7940 ( 7600-7999, P-S '52-53.)



With fewer covered hoppers in 1950, would this traffic have been shipped, bagged in box cars?



--

Allen Rueter StLouis MO

----- Original Message ----
From: al_brown03 <abrown@fit.edu>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, February 18, 2007 8:06:07 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: ACL/SAL Covered Hoppers on Wabash


Only the shorter of my two replies came through, so let me summarize
> both.


>--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, "allen rueter" <allen_282@. ..> wrote:

> >

> > I got a yard log for Martinsburg, MO 1958, (Wabash)

> >

> > Digging thru the archives I see a fair amount of fertilizer came

> > from Florida.

> >

Any one have an idea as to what make of LO (I assume) these are?
> > I'm really more interested what would be appropriate for 1950.


> With one possible exception, all cars listed are two-bay

> covered "cement hoppers", not phosphate cars. See Goolsby, Lines

> South 4th/98, pp 18-23.


> ACL series pre-1960 were:


> 85000-85014 (L-1), P-S '41.

> 85015-85074 (L-3), ACF '49.

> 85100-85699 (L-4), P-S '50-51.

> 86100-86699 (L-5), P-S '53.

> 86700-87299 (L-5), ACF '53-54.

> 87300-88099 (L-5), ACF '57.


> SAL series pre-1960 were:

> 8000-8049 (C1), P-S '40.

> 8050-8099 (C1), Greenville '42.

> 8100-8249 (C1), Bethlehem '47.

> 8250-8449 (C3), Greenville '49.

> 8450-8649, P-S '51.

> 7600-7999, P-S '52-53.

> 7200-7599, ACF '54.

> 8650-8849, ACF '56.

> 30000-30549, ACF '57.


> I don't know what SAL 7040 is: don't have a reference to that series.

> Can't help wondering if the number's correct.


It wasn't :(, should of been 7940


Pierce and Mulberry, Fla., are in the "Bone Valley" phosphate region
> east of Tampa. Pierce is just south of Mulberry on the SAL line to

> Boca Grande, the old Charlotte Harbor & Northern. Don't confuse it

> with *Fort* Pierce, a much larger town on the FEC. See Fischer, "Boca

> Grande: Once a Railroad Town" (privately published, '04), p18.



Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


>

> The following hoppers appear,

> Apr 29

> ACL | 87156 | LH | Fertz | Kersting & Fennewald

> ACL | 87025 | LH | Fertz | Kersting & Fennewald

>

> Apr 30

> ACL | 87156 | EH | Mty | Pierce Fla.

> ACL | 87025 | EH | Mty | Pierce Fla.

>

> May 12

> SAL | 7040 | EH | Mty | Pierce Fla.

> SAL | 8208 | LH | Fertz | Kersting & Fennewald < ACF 70T ?

>

> May 14

> SAL | 8208 | EH | Mty | Pierce Fla.

>

> May 21

> ACL | 87749 | EH | Mty | Pierce Fla.

> ACL | 87790 | LH | Fertz | Kersting & Fennewald

>

> May 22

> ACL | 87790 | EH | Mty | Pierce Fla.

>

> May 29

> SAL | 30021 | LH | Fertz | Kersting & Fennewald

> SAL | 30156 | LH | Fertz | Kersting & Fennewald

>

> Jul 1

> ACL | 87906 | EH | Mty | Pierce Fla.

>

> Jul 7

> SAL | 8096 | EH | Mty | Pierce Fla.

>

> Sept 26

> ACL | 87786 | LH | Fertz | Kersting & Fennewald

>

> Sept 29

> ACL | 87786 | EH | Mty | Pierce Fla.

>

> Oct 1

> ACL | 87615 | LH | Fertz | Kersting & Fennewald

>

> Oct 2

> ACL | 87615 | EH | Mty | Pierce Fla.

>

> Oct 9

> ACL | 86768 | LH | Fertz | Kersting & Fennewald

>

> Oct 10

> ACL | 86768 | EH | Mty | Mulberry Fla.

>

> Oct 28

> ACL | 85404 | EH | Mty | Pierce Fla.

>

> Nov 4

> ACL | 87700 | EH | Mty | Mulberry Fla.

> ACL | 87806 | LH | Fertz | Kersting & Fennewald

>

> Allen Rueter

> St. Louis MO







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Re: Whats a 1913 "Barber" Truck?

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 18, 2007, at 6:31 AM, Bob Karig wrote:

I've posted a PDF file at the address below that compares a number of early
cast-steel trucks with separable journal boxes. For those on dial-up, it's
about 278K.

http://home.sprintmail.com/~karig/separable.pdf
Nice, and useful, photos. However, you still seem to be laboring under some confusion about Andrews trucks. The trucks identified as Gould and Buckeye are, in fact, both Andrews trucks manufactured by the Gould Coupler Co. and the Buckeye Steel Castings Co. ASF developed and patented the Andrews design before the turn of the century, and the patents covered any truck with bolted-in journal boxes and bar steel lower journal box locator/retainers. However, ASF licensed the design to other truck manufacturers, and almost every truck manufacturer built several different variants of the Andrews truck between the turn of the century and the late 1920s. The Wolff truck also incorporated the main features of the Andrews design and may have been built under license, though the side frames were obviously unique in configuration. As Tony Thompson has already pointed out, the Bettendorf T-section truck, which pioneered the principle of journal boxes cast integral with the side frames, was also built under license by a number of other truck manufacturers than Bettendorf, and the same was true of ASF's Vulcan design in which cast steel side frames enclosed separate journal boxes in pedestal jaws. The DESIGNS are correctly identified as Andrews, Bettendorf, or Vulcan regardless of who cast the side frames or built the trucks.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Accurate STMFC freight car list

Paul Hillman
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
wrote:

On Feb 16, 2007, at 5:54 PM, Paul & Bernice Hillman wrote:
*****************************************************************
One case in point. I impetuosly purchased Walthers, Proto 2000
Series;

Mather 40ft Stock Car, GM&O
Mather 40ft boxcar, C&IM
Mather 40ft Boxcar, C&EI
******************************************************************
Richard wrote:

The Proto 2000 line was carefully researched from the outset.
That's not to say that every model is 100% accurate, but errors were
generally minor and inadvertant. All three of the Mather models you
purchased are prototypically correct for some point in time, but
whether they're correct on your model RR depends on the date it
represents.
******************************************************************

Thanks Richard for your input & verification of these car's accuracy.

I model around 1947, the last year for C&EI steam, and the car-types
are current for that period.

Of course it's true that the car's build/rebuild date is highly
relevant to the period one's modelling and has to be considered when
purchasing, painting & building a model car.

To the bottom left of the car's side doors there's a date, IE) C.R.5-
43. What does that literally mean? I presume it's the rebuild date,
as "Car Rebuilt 5-43"?

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: Paint Match for P2K NYC and P&LE Greenville Gons

armprem
 

John,Check Accupaint.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "John Golden" <golden1014@yahoo.com>
To: <stmfc@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, February 18, 2007 2:23 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Paint Match for P2K NYC and P&LE Greenville Gons


> Gentlemen,
>
> Does anyone know the paint match for the P2K NYC and
> P&LE Greenville gons--the as-delivered freight car
> brown paint? I have several that I have modified (with
> the correct ladders, etc. and can't seem to match with
> Scalecoat. Thanks for the help.
>
> John
>
>
> John Golden
> O'Fallon, IL
>
> http://www.pbase.com/golden1014
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> Version: 7.5.441 / Virus Database: 268.17.37/682 - Release Date: 2/12/2007 1:23 PM
>
>


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Paint Match for P2K NYC and P&LE Greenville Gons

golden1014
 

Gentlemen,

Does anyone know the paint match for the P2K NYC and
P&LE Greenville gons--the as-delivered freight car
brown paint? I have several that I have modified (with
the correct ladders, etc. and can't seem to match with
Scalecoat. Thanks for the help.

John


John Golden
O'Fallon, IL

http://www.pbase.com/golden1014


Corrected links to Excel file version of 1950 ORER

laramielarry <ostresh@...>
 

The links got garbled in my last post. Here ist what I intended to say:

As a reminder: All of you have free access to the Excel file version
of the July 1950 ORER. It contains the car heights from which you can
construct many of the tables above. It also has a rudimentary division
into DS/SS/Steel (collations of USRA DS, USRA SS files, and several
files that divide "steel" into 1923 ARA, 1932 ARA, etc., up to 50' PS1 –
all posted at various times by members of this group.). This file can
be downloaded from Mike Brock's Steam Era Freight Car Analysis (STEFA)
site. To access the file, you will first need to become a member of the
group:

Post message: STEFA@yahoogroups.com
Subscribe: STEFA-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
Unsubscribe: STEFA-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
List owner: STEFA-owner@yahoogroups.com

Sorry
Larry

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