Date   

Re: Mainline Modeler back issue sale - off topic, sorta, sorry

George Hollwedel <georgeloop@...>
 

books

----- Original Message -----
From: "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Saturday, February 24, 2007 11:07 AM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Mainline Modeler back issue sale - off topic, sorta, sorry





True, media mail must not have any advertising. If you can
convince he/she
that they are old and out dated it might fly

George Hollwedel-Postal Technician
OK, then what DOES qualify as "media mail?"

SGL





Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: Car travel (was NMRA Book)

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Thanks Tim, this is good stuff.

Let me rephrase the second question: Did the increased possibility of originating and terminating a particular load on the big roads with wider areas and customer bases lead to a detectably higher percentage of home road cars on those roads?

And a follow-up to question 1: Certainly there were variations in the home road percentage due to the economy, but was the swing in a good vs. bad year something that would be readily discernible by looking a the composition of a train or active yard (statistics of small sample sizes aside) or would this only be seen if one watched storage yards and deadlines?

Thanks again,
KL

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tim Gilbert" <tgilbert@...>

1. For boxcars, was the home road percentage (which I'm defining as the
number of own-road cars found on the owning road) typically higher or lower
than the national fleet percentage? (Realizing that the percentages were
probably all over the place based on a number of circumstances, just trying
to get a feel if it was "about the same", "a little higher", "about half",
"triple the number", something like that.)

Kurt,

The PRR owned between 9-10% of the National Boxcar fleet. The percentage
of PRR to total boxcars on the PRR was greater than 9-10% because 1)
home road boxcars served somewhat as a strategic reserve to be used only
when other alternatives were exhausted; 2) in times when there was a
national boxcar surplus, many PRR boxcars were returned home empty and
placed in storage until the economy picked up again; and 3) a much
higher percentage of PRR boxcars were unserviceable (or in car shops or
dead lines) than those owned by foreign roads which were on the PRR.

The same thing happened on other roads - particularly when there was a
boxcar surplus which caused the home road percentage to sky rocket.

2. Was the home road percentage affected by the geographical area served?
For example, would it be different for a road like the Santa Fe, Southern,
or PRR that covered a large area or a wide range of customers than for a
road like the Maine Central or Monon that might have had a smaller area or
customer base but owned a similar or higher proportion of boxcars? (In
other words, if, say, the NYC and C&EI each had 45% boxcars in their fleet,
would their home road percentages likely be the same or different?)


A larger road like the ATSF, SOU and PRR owned a higher percentage of
the national boxcar fleet than smaller roads like the CIL and MEC, so
there was a built in bias - the PRR owned 9-10% of the national fleet
while the MEC owned about 0.4% meaning that, the PRR boxcars were 9
percent plus of the total boxcars on the PRR while the MEC's percentage
would be 0.4% plus. The "plusses" would include the effect of strategic
reserve, cars in storage or in car shops. How much those "plusses" were
on the overall home road percentages varied.
----- Original Message -----


Re: Mainline Modeler back issue sale - off topic, sorta, sorry

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Schuyler Larrabee

OK, then what DOES qualify as "media mail?"
----- Original Message -----

Media Mail
Generally used for books (at least eight pages), film, printed music, printed test materials, sound recordings, play scripts, printed educational charts, loose-leaf pages and binders consisting of medical information, and computer-readable media. Advertising restrictions apply. There are presorted rates available for bulk quantities of Media Mail (minimum quantity is 300 pieces). There is also a barcoded discount available for Media Mail.



www.usps.com

KL


Re: Mainline Modeler back issue sale - off topic, sorta, sorry

ljack70117@...
 

Books, Videos, DVD and so on
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@...
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left

On Feb 24, 2007, at 12:07 PM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:




True, media mail must not have any advertising. If you can
convince he/she
that they are old and out dated it might fly

George Hollwedel-Postal Technician
OK, then what DOES qualify as "media mail?"

SGL



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Re: Car travel (was NMRA Book)

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Kurt Laughlin wrote:

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tim Gilbert" <tgilbert@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Saturday, February 24, 2007 10:51 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] NMRA book



1) Individual boxcars, because they could be reloaded with a wide
variety of commodities, could be seen anywhere in the US. Indeed, there
was a correlation between the percentage of ownership of foreign boxcars
on a line with the percentage of the boxcars that the specific boxcar
owner owned of the national boxcar fleet. That the CGW owned about 4,000
boxcars (or 0.55% of the national fleet of 720,000 boxcars) meant that
about 1 in every 180 boxcars could be owned by the CGW in any part of
the country whether it be Harrisburg, California, Maine or Florida.

2) The operating range of hoppers was far more restricted than boxcars
because they were generally loaded with only one commodity - coal.
Therefore, when unloaded, they generally were returned to the mines
empty although, not in all cases, to mines on the home roads.

3) Gondolas fell in somewhere between boxcars and hoppers. The operating
range of General Service Flatcars were more like boxcars than hoppers.
----- Original Message -----

I know this has been covered before in bits and pieces but I like this message for it's succinct and qualitative (rather than quantitative) discussion. If I could carry this further in the same vein:

1. For boxcars, was the home road percentage (which I'm defining as the number of own-road cars found on the owning road) typically higher or lower than the national fleet percentage? (Realizing that the percentages were probably all over the place based on a number of circumstances, just trying to get a feel if it was "about the same", "a little higher", "about half", "triple the number", something like that.)
Kurt,

The PRR owned between 9-10% of the National Boxcar fleet. The percentage of PRR to total boxcars on the PRR was greater than 9-10% because 1) home road boxcars served somewhat as a strategic reserve to be used only when other alternatives were exhausted; 2) in times when there was a national boxcar surplus, many PRR boxcars were returned home empty and placed in storage until the economy picked up again; and 3) a much higher percentage of PRR boxcars were unserviceable (or in car shops or dead lines) than those owned by foreign roads which were on the PRR.

The same thing happened on other roads - particularly when there was a boxcar surplus which caused the home road percentage to sky rocket.

2. Was the home road percentage affected by the geographical area served? For example, would it be different for a road like the Santa Fe, Southern, or PRR that covered a large area or a wide range of customers than for a road like the Maine Central or Monon that might have had a smaller area or customer base but owned a similar or higher proportion of boxcars? (In other words, if, say, the NYC and C&EI each had 45% boxcars in their fleet, would their home road percentages likely be the same or different?)

A larger road like the ATSF, SOU and PRR owned a higher percentage of the national boxcar fleet than smaller roads like the CIL and MEC, so there was a built in bias - the PRR owned 9-10% of the national fleet while the MEC owned about 0.4% meaning that, the PRR boxcars were 9 percent plus of the total boxcars on the PRR while the MEC's percentage would be 0.4% plus. The "plusses" would include the effect of strategic reserve, cars in storage or in car shops. How much those "plusses" were on the overall home road percentages varied.

Tim Gilbert


Re: Mainline Modeler back issue sale - off topic, sorta, sorry

Schuyler Larrabee
 


True, media mail must not have any advertising. If you can
convince he/she
that they are old and out dated it might fly

George Hollwedel-Postal Technician
OK, then what DOES qualify as "media mail?"

SGL


Current prototype resource books

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Prototype Modeling, Vol 1 - published by Speedwitch
Prototype Modeling, Vol 2 - published by Speedwitch
Focus on Freight Cars, Vol 1 - Hendrickson, published by Speedwitch
The Postwar Freight Car Fleet - Kline & Culotta, published by NMRA

All probably contributing to a recent marked reduction in the sales of resin car kits due to
modeling budget stress. . . 8^)

I'm not certain about the availability of the first three, but the last appears to be very nearly
out of print, based on the posts here about how hard it is to find.

SGL

Dear Schuyler and other listers:

Now I'm cornfuzzled. I have two books, each by Culotta,
volumes one and two of Prototype Railroading, and "Focus on
freightcars " by Hendrickson. Now, is there a new fourth
book? The Post WWII freightcars or somesuch? Sorry, just
picked up the thread.

Thanks,

Rich Nunn


Re: Coal to New England (was NMRA book)

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Don Burn wrote:

Tim Gilbert wrote:

2) The operating range of hoppers was far more restricted than boxcars
because they were generally loaded with only one commodity - coal.
Therefore, when unloaded, they generally were returned to the mines
empty although, not in all cases, to mines on the home roads.

Does anyone have any data on patterns of hoppers usage to deliver coal to New England? Particularily, coal for home heating? This was a common industry, even for small towns. The question is what were the likely road names you would see in such service? Also, I would assume a particualr coal yard would probably be getting their supply from the same supplier, so would see hoppers from the same railroad and not a variety of lines, is this correct?

Don,

Before the 1930's, much of the Anthracite Coal used for home heating was hauled via Tidewater in barges from New York and Delaware Bays in "Schooner Barges." Some of this traffic was transferred into hoppers or gons generally owned by the New England roads. Some of this traffic never rode on New England Rails - the dealers being at quayside.

With the improved operating procedures made possible by the 1920's Modernization Programs, all-rail transport from the Anthracite Breakers to New England Anthracite dealers became the norm. The hoppers (& some gons because some dealers were not equipped to unload hoppers) were generally owned by roads serving the anthracite fields in NE Pennsylvania (D&H, LV, RDG, ERIE, DL&W, PRR). But there was no guarantee that a breaker on the one of the anthracite roads would use the home road's hoppers - e.g. in November-December 1952, dealers on the Suncook Valley RR in New Hampshire received four carloads of Anthracite from a colliery in Coxton PA located on the Lehigh Valley RR: - the hoppers used were owned by the LV, L&NE and D&H plus a PRR gon.

For Bituminous Coal used in power generation, all of the coal originated by mines on the C&O, VGN and N&W was transshipped in Hampton Roads into colliers (and, before 1930, schooner barges) for ports in New England where the coal could be transferred in New England-owned Hoppers or consumed quayside - the largest user of bituminous coal in New England was the Eastern Gas & Fuel Works in Everett MA, and all their coal came via Hampton Roads.

Bituminous coal mined in western PA and northern WV was all rail after 1930 in B&O, WM, PRR and other roads serving those coal fields. Before 1930, some of that coal was transshipped at Baltimore and Philadelphia for New England.

I'm also curious about home heating oil, which again I would assume would follow similar patterns.

All of the Tank Cars in New England except those used to store diesel fuel for railroad use were owned by private owners - either shippers or private tank car lines who leased cars to shippers. Thus, the tank cars used were more consistent once it is known how each shipper garnered his tank care: - e.g. ESSO and Socony leased their cars from UTLX; Texaco sold their TCX fleet to GATX in the 1930's and leased their cars from GATX afterwards (although some still had TCX marks); American used their own MPLX fleet and Gulf used their GRCX fleet. Except for ESSO which had a refinery in Chelsea MA, most petroleum products came to New England via Tidewater.

Tim Gilbert

Tim Gilbert


Re: Car travel (was NMRA Book)

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tim Gilbert" <tgilbert@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Saturday, February 24, 2007 10:51 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] NMRA book


1) Individual boxcars, because they could be reloaded with a wide
variety of commodities, could be seen anywhere in the US. Indeed, there
was a correlation between the percentage of ownership of foreign boxcars
on a line with the percentage of the boxcars that the specific boxcar
owner owned of the national boxcar fleet. That the CGW owned about 4,000
boxcars (or 0.55% of the national fleet of 720,000 boxcars) meant that
about 1 in every 180 boxcars could be owned by the CGW in any part of
the country whether it be Harrisburg, California, Maine or Florida.

2) The operating range of hoppers was far more restricted than boxcars
because they were generally loaded with only one commodity - coal.
Therefore, when unloaded, they generally were returned to the mines
empty although, not in all cases, to mines on the home roads.

3) Gondolas fell in somewhere between boxcars and hoppers. The operating
range of General Service Flatcars were more like boxcars than hoppers.
----- Original Message -----

I know this has been covered before in bits and pieces but I like this message for it's succinct and qualitative (rather than quantitative) discussion. If I could carry this further in the same vein:

1. For boxcars, was the home road percentage (which I'm defining as the number of own-road cars found on the owning road) typically higher or lower than the national fleet percentage? (Realizing that the percentages were probably all over the place based on a number of circumstances, just trying to get a feel if it was "about the same", "a little higher", "about half", "triple the number", something like that.)

2. Was the home road percentage affected by the geographical area served? For example, would it be different for a road like the Santa Fe, Southern, or PRR that covered a large area or a wide range of customers than for a road like the Maine Central or Monon that might have had a smaller area or customer base but owned a similar or higher proportion of boxcars? (In other words, if, say, the NYC and C&EI each had 45% boxcars in their fleet, would their home road percentages likely be the same or different?)

Thanks,
KL


Re: NMRA book

David Powell <daveydiesel@...>
 

Caboose Hobbies is out of stock on the Postwar Freight Car Book as I
just got the last one in stock. Dave Powell
Iowa

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Don Burn
Sent: Saturday, February 24, 2007 10:01 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] NMRA book

Tim Gilbert wrote:

2) The operating range of hoppers was far more restricted than boxcars
because they were generally loaded with only one commodity - coal.
Therefore, when unloaded, they generally were returned to the mines
empty although, not in all cases, to mines on the home roads.
Does anyone have any data on patterns of hoppers usage to deliver coal
to
New England? Particularily, coal for home heating? This was a common
industry, even for small towns. The question is what were the likely
road
names you would see in such service? Also, I would assume a particualr
coal yard would probably be getting their supply from the same supplier,
so
would see hoppers from the same railroad and not a variety of lines, is
this correct?

I'm also curious about home heating oil, which again I would assume
would
follow similar patterns.

Don Burn





Yahoo! Groups Links




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Re: NMRA book

Don Burn
 

Tim Gilbert wrote:

2) The operating range of hoppers was far more restricted than boxcars
because they were generally loaded with only one commodity - coal.
Therefore, when unloaded, they generally were returned to the mines
empty although, not in all cases, to mines on the home roads.
Does anyone have any data on patterns of hoppers usage to deliver coal to New England? Particularily, coal for home heating? This was a common industry, even for small towns. The question is what were the likely road names you would see in such service? Also, I would assume a particualr coal yard would probably be getting their supply from the same supplier, so would see hoppers from the same railroad and not a variety of lines, is this correct?

I'm also curious about home heating oil, which again I would assume would follow similar patterns.

Don Burn


Re: NMRA book

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

sc279373 wrote:

I recieved Ted's book via the NMRA,it arrived Thursday.Also arriving
with it was the reprinted Steel book,I doubt I could have got either in
any British book shop(I live in UK).
The thing that is puzzling me is that I don't remember ordering them at
all!!!
Not having had time to do no more than flip through it,Ted's book
look's excellent and has answered one query I've often had i.e how far
east did western road cars get?
There are PE and CGW cars pictured in Harrisburg and Maryland-just the
thing I was after.
Steve,

It depends upon the car type.

1) Individual boxcars, because they could be reloaded with a wide variety of commodities, could be seen anywhere in the US. Indeed, there was a correlation between the percentage of ownership of foreign boxcars on a line with the percentage of the boxcars that the specific boxcar owner owned of the national boxcar fleet. That the CGW owned about 4,000 boxcars (or 0.55% of the national fleet of 720,000 boxcars) meant that about 1 in every 180 boxcars could be owned by the CGW in any part of the country whether it be Harrisburg, California, Maine or Florida.

2) The operating range of hoppers was far more restricted than boxcars because they were generally loaded with only one commodity - coal. Therefore, when unloaded, they generally were returned to the mines empty although, not in all cases, to mines on the home roads.

3) Gondolas fell in somewhere between boxcars and hoppers. The operating range of General Service Flatcars were more like boxcars than hoppers.

Tim Gilbert


Re: Chalk marks

Schuyler Larrabee
 

From Mike Del Vecchio:

O.K. Dokes, supposedly the origin of the phrase "Okay."
I agree with Tony that this isn't likely for the origin of OK, but when I read this I could hear
"okie-dokie."


"you could sure tell a Penn man, but
you couldn't tell him
much!"
Around here, in eastern Massachusetts, that's what you say about a Harvard Man. "You can always
tell a Harvard man, but you can't tell him MUCH!"

And, boy, is it true!!

SGL


ART Reefers redux

asychis@...
 

Hi Guys,

At long last we have received a shipment of the assembled ART reefers that
have eluded us for so long. This was a partial shipment of 192 out of 600
total. From reservations, we've sold 107 of those already. There are eight
numbers, and they sell for $29.95. You can buy the on e-Bay (search for ART
RTR) or via our website (_www.amarillorailmuseum.com_
(http://www.amarillorailmuseum.com) ).

If you reserved cars with us in the last year or so (I know, it's been a
long trek!), I will ship out all the reserved cars on Monday via Priority Mail.
So, if you wonder if yours are included, please wait until late next week.
If you haven't gotten them by that time, drop me a line at
_amarillorail@... (mailto:amarillorail@...) .

By the way, we still ahve a few unnumbered kits left at $18.95 each. These
have some detail misalignment problems, but InterMountain is going to send
replacement directly to our customers in the next month.

Thanks for your support and patience! Now that InterMountain seems to have
a handle on this project, we hope to have ART reefers in various paint
schemes (only valid ART schemes of course) available over the next year.

Jerry Michels
Amarillo Railroad Museum
<BR><BR><BR>**************************************<BR> AOL now offers free
email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at
http://www.aol.com.


NMRA book

sc279373 <sccooper@...>
 

I recieved Ted's book via the NMRA,it arrived Thursday.Also arriving
with it was the reprinted Steel book,I doubt I could have got either in
any British book shop(I live in UK).
The thing that is puzzling me is that I don't remember ordering them at
all!!!
Not having had time to do no more than flip through it,Ted's book
look's excellent and has answered one query I've often had i.e how far
east did western road cars get?
There are PE and CGW cars pictured in Harrisburg and Maryland-just the
thing I was after.
Regards
Steve


Re: Mainline Modeler back issue sale

ljack70117@...
 

The clerk told me even if they were 100 years old they were still a NO NO. She was willing to ship them for me but said if they were inspected they would be destroyed.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@...
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left

On Feb 24, 2007, at 7:50 AM, George Hollwedel wrote:

True, media mail must not have any advertising. If you can convince he/she
that they are old and out dated it might fly

George Hollwedel-Postal Technician

----- Original Message -----
From: <ljack70117@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Saturday, February 24, 2007 6:09 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Mainline Modeler back issue sale


Do not let the PO Clerk know you are shipping magazines as media
mail. That is a NO NO.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@...
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left




On Feb 24, 2007, at 3:29 AM, Andy Carlson wrote:

I have found that up to 5 issues fit in a $4.05 flat mail envelope,
and $1.00 will ship a single magazine by media mail.



I have the following issues of Hundman's Mailine Modeler magazines
offered for sale. More than one copy is noted with an (*), all
others are limited to single copies. Priced at $2.00 each, plus
$4.05 priority shipping for up to 5 issues, or $1.00 media mail for
1 issue. If more than one copy is desired, I will quote the
shipping charge. All are in good condition. Better than good issues
will be marked with a (+), while slightly less than good condition
will earn a (-). Contact me at <midcentury@...> Thanks,
-Andy

1980...Sep/Oct*+
1981...Jan/Feb*+ Mar/Apr May/Jun*
1982...Jan/Feb+ April+ Aug/Sep*+- Oct-
1983...Aug
1984...Jul+ Sep+ Oct+ Dec*+-
1985...May+ Oct+ Nov+ Dec*+
1986...Jun+ Oct Nov+
1987...Jan Apr+ Oct*+
1988...Mar+
1989...Apr Jun+ Sep
1990...Jan*+ Apr+ Jun Sep+
1991...NONE
1992...Mar* Jun*+ Aug Oct+














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Re: Mainline Modeler back issue sale

George Hollwedel <georgeloop@...>
 

True, media mail must not have any advertising. If you can convince he/she that they are old and out dated it might fly

George Hollwedel-Postal Technician

----- Original Message -----
From: <ljack70117@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Saturday, February 24, 2007 6:09 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Mainline Modeler back issue sale


Do not let the PO Clerk know you are shipping magazines as media
mail. That is a NO NO.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@...
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left




On Feb 24, 2007, at 3:29 AM, Andy Carlson wrote:

I have found that up to 5 issues fit in a $4.05 flat mail envelope,
and $1.00 will ship a single magazine by media mail.



I have the following issues of Hundman's Mailine Modeler magazines
offered for sale. More than one copy is noted with an (*), all
others are limited to single copies. Priced at $2.00 each, plus
$4.05 priority shipping for up to 5 issues, or $1.00 media mail for
1 issue. If more than one copy is desired, I will quote the
shipping charge. All are in good condition. Better than good issues
will be marked with a (+), while slightly less than good condition
will earn a (-). Contact me at <midcentury@...> Thanks,
-Andy

1980...Sep/Oct*+
1981...Jan/Feb*+ Mar/Apr May/Jun*
1982...Jan/Feb+ April+ Aug/Sep*+- Oct-
1983...Aug
1984...Jul+ Sep+ Oct+ Dec*+-
1985...May+ Oct+ Nov+ Dec*+
1986...Jun+ Oct Nov+
1987...Jan Apr+ Oct*+
1988...Mar+
1989...Apr Jun+ Sep
1990...Jan*+ Apr+ Jun Sep+
1991...NONE
1992...Mar* Jun*+ Aug Oct+














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Great things are happening at Yahoo! Groups. See the new email
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Re: Mainline Modeler back issue sale

ljack70117@...
 

Do not let the PO Clerk know you are shipping magazines as media mail. That is a NO NO.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@...
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left

On Feb 24, 2007, at 3:29 AM, Andy Carlson wrote:

I have found that up to 5 issues fit in a $4.05 flat mail envelope, and $1.00 will ship a single magazine by media mail.



I have the following issues of Hundman's Mailine Modeler magazines offered for sale. More than one copy is noted with an (*), all others are limited to single copies. Priced at $2.00 each, plus $4.05 priority shipping for up to 5 issues, or $1.00 media mail for 1 issue. If more than one copy is desired, I will quote the shipping charge. All are in good condition. Better than good issues will be marked with a (+), while slightly less than good condition will earn a (-). Contact me at <midcentury@...> Thanks,
-Andy

1980...Sep/Oct*+
1981...Jan/Feb*+ Mar/Apr May/Jun*
1982...Jan/Feb+ April+ Aug/Sep*+- Oct-
1983...Aug
1984...Jul+ Sep+ Oct+ Dec*+-
1985...May+ Oct+ Nov+ Dec*+
1986...Jun+ Oct Nov+
1987...Jan Apr+ Oct*+
1988...Mar+
1989...Apr Jun+ Sep
1990...Jan*+ Apr+ Jun Sep+
1991...NONE
1992...Mar* Jun*+ Aug Oct+














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Re: Speedwitch Freight Car book

RICH NUNN <flyingtigers_nunn@...>
 

Dear Scuyler and other listers:

Now I'm cornfuzzled. I have two books, each by Culotta, volumes one and two of Prototype Railroading, and "Focus on freightcars " by Hendrickson. Now, is there a new fourth book? The Post WWII freightcars or somesuch? Sorry, just picked up the thread.

Thanks,

Rich Nunn


---------------------------------
Finding fabulous fares is fun.
Let Yahoo! FareChase search your favorite travel sites to find flight and hotel bargains.


Lanes Trains website update

Bill Lane <billlane@...>
 

HI All,

Note my tricky new email address! My Comcast address still works though...

I have been a man possessed for the past 2 weeks updating my websites. Lanes
Trains has some new pages, but I have tried to make it dial up user
friendly. Most of the photos are small and pop up bigger now to large crisp
photos. You will not have to turn off your pop up blocker either. There are
over 40 different pop up photos of S Scale models shown from the My Models
Page. If you have wondered what a certain model looks like I may have it in
the permanent website collection now.


Please give it a look. You could vote for the NASG website award if you like
it as well.

Thank You,
Bill Lane

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy in 1957 in S Scale since 1988

See my finished models at:
http://www.lanestrains.com
Look at what has been made in PRR in S Scale!

Importing a Brass S Scale PRR X29 & G26
http://www.pennsysmodels.com

PRR Builders Photos Bought, Sold & Traded
(Trading is MUCH preferred)
http://mywebpages.comcast.net/billlane/PRRphotos.xls

***Join the PRR T&HS***
The other members are not ALL like me!
http://www.prrths.com
http://mywebpages.comcast.net/billlane/PRRTHS_Application.pdf

Join the Pennsylvania Reading Seashore Lines Historical Society
It's FREE (for now) http://www.prslhs.com
Preserving The Memory Of The PRSL

See my Altoona train videos here http://www.myspace.com/billlane



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