Date   

Re: Wabash Rebuilt War Emegency Hopper

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

Thanks Tony, That is what I was thinking of, the removal of the tax
advantage.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


It was certainly allowed. What was DISallowed was the previous
tax practice of treating the work as "repair," when in fact a like-new
car was created: thus the work had to be re-capitalized, not written
off as repairs.
This removed much of the tax advantage of rebuilding, and it's
true that many roads cut way back on, or eliminated, rebuilding of the
type that extensively renewed the car.


Re: Wabash Rebuilt War Emegency Hopper

Russ Strodtz <sheridan@...>
 

Brian,

As late as the GP35 era some roads were still using the
"rebuilding" fiction to transform say F3A's into GP35's.

Some of these tricks are still going on today. One of
the terms used is "Like Kind Exchange".

Russ

----- Original Message -----
From: Brian J Carlson
To: stmfc@...
Sent: Friday, 02 March, 2007 17:30
Subject: [STMFC] Wabash Rebuilt War Emegency Hopper


I recently acquired a Wabash steel-sided WW2 War emergency
hopper. I was
surprised the car has a NEW date of 5-59. Apparently the
Wabash considered
them new cars for accounting purposes when they were
resided. I thought
this practice was no longer allowed after the early
1950's.


Re: Wabash Rebuilt War Emegency Hopper

Gary Roe
 

Brian,

Chet French can correct me if I am wrong; but I remember him saying that the Wabash started putting the steel sides in the cars in 1958. As to the practice of showing a "revised" NEW date, I can't say.

gary roe

----- Original Message -----
From: Brian J Carlson
To: stmfc@...
Sent: Friday, 02 March, 2007 5:30 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Wabash Rebuilt War Emegency Hopper


I recently acquired a Wabash steel-sided WW2 War emergency hopper. I was
surprised the car has a NEW date of 5-59. Apparently the Wabash considered
them new cars for accounting purposes when they were resided. I thought
this practice was no longer allowed after the early 1950's. When did the
Wabash start to replace the sides with steel plate? According to the Model
RR magazine index website, Ed Hawkins did a two part article in the December
2000, and April 2001 issues of RMJ. Did either of these articles discuss the
Wabash cars rebuilt with steel sides? My main quandary is I model August
1957, can the model be renumbered to fit within my era. Thanks for any help?
Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: Wabash Rebuilt War Emegency Hopper

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Brian J Carlson wrote:
I recently acquired a Wabash steel-sided WW2 War emergency hopper. I was
surprised the car has a NEW date of 5-59. Apparently the Wabash considered
them new cars for accounting purposes when they were resided. I thought
this practice was no longer allowed after the early 1950's.
It was certainly allowed. What was DISallowed was the previous tax practice of treating the work as "repair," when in fact a like-new car was created: thus the work had to be re-capitalized, not written off as repairs.
This removed much of the tax advantage of rebuilding, and it's true that many roads cut way back on, or eliminated, rebuilding of the type that extensively renewed the car.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Athearn Flat Cars

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Mar 2, 2007, at 1:19 PM, Mark Mathu wrote:

Some notes I have say the closest matches are:

Athearn #1349 40' Flat Car
Rutland
True, the 2700-2799 series; years ago I wrote an RMJ article on modeling these cars by reworking the Athearn flat car. Note, however, that in 1945 only 55 of these cars were in revenue service (a few had been converted to low-side gondolas and the rest were in MW service and did not go off-line). By 1953, the number of revenue service cars had been reduced to 38. So the likelihood of these cars turning up in interchange on other RRs was very small.

Athearn #1399 50' Flat Car
MP 8000-8099 converted for TOFC service with 13 stake pockets
I wouldn't call that a close match, since the MoPac cars were 45' long (45'9" over strikers), which renders the Athearn model 5' too long.

With all the prototypically accurate flat cars that are now on the market (Red Caboose, Proto 2000, Walthers, Tichy, Bowser, et. al. in styrene and numerous others in resin), why mess around with the Athearn clunkers, which don't measure up to current standards even when extensively reworked? YMMV, of course.

Richard Hendrickson


Wabash Rebuilt War Emegency Hopper

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

I recently acquired a Wabash steel-sided WW2 War emergency hopper. I was
surprised the car has a NEW date of 5-59. Apparently the Wabash considered
them new cars for accounting purposes when they were resided. I thought
this practice was no longer allowed after the early 1950's. When did the
Wabash start to replace the sides with steel plate? According to the Model
RR magazine index website, Ed Hawkins did a two part article in the December
2000, and April 2001 issues of RMJ. Did either of these articles discuss the
Wabash cars rebuilt with steel sides? My main quandary is I model August
1957, can the model be renumbered to fit within my era. Thanks for any help?
Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: Athearn Flat Cars

Mark Mathu
 

Richard Hendrickson wrote:

Unfortunately, the answer is almost none. Back in the dark ages, when
these models were tooled, little thought was given to prototype
accuracy and the resulting models are generic (i.e., imaginary). The
40' flat is fairly close to a Rutland prototype (though that wasn't
intentional); the 50' flat doesn't resemble any prototype cars, though
it can be cut up into sections and kitbashed into models that are
relatively prototypical.

Some notes I have say the closest matches are:

Athearn #1349 40' Flat Car
Rutland

Athearn #1399 50' Flat Car
MP 8000-8099 converted for TOFC service with 13 stake pockets

__________
Mark Mathu
Whitefish Bay, Wis.


more about brass wire

ed_mines
 

Almost forgot, I bought some small diameter brass wire in 30" lengths
from Special Shapes - .010 &.012" They call 'em round solid bars.

They sell some flat wire which they call flat bars - 1/32 X 1/64 was
useful.

Ed


Re: Rib side box with 8' doors.

Tim O'Connor
 

Denny, I don't know of any prewar Milwaukee ribside car rebuilt
with 8' doors. A limited number of the postwar cars were rebuilt
w/ 8' doors (and at least one was converted back to 6' later). The
Western Pacific bought exactly two postwar ribside cars in 1962
and rebuilt them with 9 foot doors for appliance service. (Note
I'm only talking about the 40' cars.) I have not seen any photos
of cars with replacement roofs.

Tim O'Connor


------------------------------------------------------------------

After stating confidently that the HO model 40' long-rib side car
that I held in my hot little hand had 4/4 ends, Ed Hawkins comments-

All of Milwaukee's early rib-side 40' box cars built from 1939 to
1944 had 5/5 Dreadnaught Ends.
Ed is of course correct, and although knowing better, I also cannot
count :-[ . The ends of this wood ribside model boxcar indeed has
5/5 ends, not 4/4!

Now, the same question: Does anyone know whether or not this car
replicates a real prototype?

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


Re: brass wire for detailing

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., centga@... wrote:> McMaster Carr has wire
down to .02, I'm surprised they don't have anything smaller.

I bought a life time supply (1/4 lb.)spool of .014 inch soft iron wire
from McMaster; it's flat black and was great for replacing grab irons
on Intermountain SFRD reefers. .016" of the same type of wire is silver.

I tried to buy smaller diameter wire from the manufacturer but .014" is
the smallest they sell as a stock item.

I have a big box of soft copper wire scraps that I picked up off the
floor of various factories where I worked. McMaster offers many sizes.

For rigid wire I use the Tichy & DA that others have mentioned. Flat
wire too. I bought a box of .020" brass "rods" made by K&S years ago.
Occasionally I used the .015" spring wire from K&S for straight pieces.
Every hobby shop used to sell it. It's difficult to cut and near
impossible to bend. I never tired to heat it though.

I find the rigid wire is difficult to fit for brake piping. That's why
I like the soft stuff.

Anyone buy that green florist's wire that used to be included in kits?

Ed


Re: Athearn Flat Cars

Charles Hladik
 

Mark,
The best I could find on the Rutland series cars was that they were
numbered in the 2700-2799 series and were black. In '53 only 30 remained. A
couple of years ago they were:

2700 used as a bridge
2709 on the Green Mountain Railway
2762 At the Danbury Railway Museum in Danbury CT
2777 At Steamtown displayed with a marble load

Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division
<BR><BR><BR>**************************************<BR> AOL now offers free
email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at
http://www.aol.com.


Re: N&G HO Semaphore Signals type 2A

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

A short time ago 2 of the original kits were on ebay. Both sold for over $200 each which makes Andy's $89 build-up seem like a bargain.

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: box car classification

Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...>
 

Posted by: "ed_mines" > Would specialized box cars like double door cars, 50 ft. cars & hide
loading cars be set aside in larger yards?

No, unless there were enough cars of a type, e.g. grain boxes in a loading area, to justify a track for them. specialized empties with no as yet assigned destination would be put in the hold track. All large yards had one or more hold tracks ito which were switched cars without bills, cars awaiting assignment, etc. Typically a hold track would be humped once a day.

Would a line of beat up cars near the end of their lives be realistic?
I like those cars so I'd like to be able to have a lot of them, maybe
more than would be justified otherwise. I've seen some yard photos where there seem to be a disproportionate number of double door box cars in a line.

If there were enough such old cars, they would be set aside on their own track just to get them out of the way of switching. Usually railroads would like for little used tracks away from main classification tracks to store these cars.


=======================




Malcolm Laughlin, Editor 617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478


Re: Rib side box with 8' doors.

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

After stating confidently that the HO model 40' long-rib side car that I held in my hot little hand had 4/4 ends, Ed Hawkins comments-

All of Milwaukee's early rib-side 40' box cars built from 1939 to
1944 had 5/5 Dreadnaught Ends.
Ed is of course correct, and although knowing better, I also cannot count :-[ . The ends of this wood ribside model boxcar indeed has 5/5 ends, not 4/4!

Now, the same question: Does anyone know whether or not this car replicates a real prototype?

Denny

--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


Re: brass wire for detailing

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Richard notes-
Clover House also has various sizes of brass wire.... and Russ Clover is a good guy who runs a first rate direct-mail operation. www.cloverhouse.com
Richard has that exactly right. Over the years Russ has been the first to carry some of the most interesting and useful scratch-building and detailing products that railroad modelers could wish for. His fine line of dry transfers include the all time best billboard: Sudbury Brewing Co.'s "Even the Camel Cant Go" [sic.] and "This is the Beer Boys" [sic.]. I will probably bite the bullet and create this car just for the graphics.

Russ first advertised his business in MR in about 1953. With a twinkle in his eye he commented to me last year that "[his business] had been a perfectly good way to absolutely ruin a fine hobby for me!" His catalogues over the years have been beautiful.

He is looking to retirement, and we should join him in hoping that he can pass his business on to someone else with his his good humor and commitment to service.

Denny

--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


Re: "Armour" marked reefers

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

Kurt,
If you're modeling HO scale Oddballs has a decal set for the TRAX/PCX
cars which had the 'standard' Armour paint scheme. Although the Trax
cars had black ends and either side color or bcr or black roofs!! The
PCX cars had bcr ends and roofs. I would look at the IM ART model or
the Walthers reefer as a starting point. The steel ARLX cars were
rebuilt in the late 50s with their numbers changed from the 1-2000
series to the 8, 9000 series' maybe more. There's an article in Ted
Culotta's first model magazine on the steel ARLX reefers.
Clark Propst


Parts sources (was:brass wire for detailing)

Miller, Andrew S. <asmiller@...>
 

Along with Small Parts (www.smallparts.com), a great source is Micro
Fasteners (www.microfasteners.com -of course). They have almost every
type of 2-56 and smaller hardware you might need. They are the only
source I have found for 2-56 fender washers, necessary to mount the new
Walthers passenger car trucks with the BIG hole. I say "almost"
because they don't have 2-56 1.5" screws which I need to hold roofs on
to HO passenger cars. For that I go to McMaster-Carr
(www.mcmaster.com)

My apologies to the STMFC for the passenger content ;-)

regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Don Burn
Sent: Friday, March 02, 2007 8:00 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: brass wire for detailing

There is a company called Small Parts, Inc that sell brass and other
wire
in various sizes through the Amazon website. Haven't tried them myself
but
they seem to have a large variety.

Don Burn






Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: brass wire for detailing

Bruce Smith
 

On Mar 2, 2007, at 6:29 AM, Michael Watnoski wrote:
The Detail
Associates wire is hard. If it is bent at a tight right angle it
will break. The area wher it is to bent should be heated with a
butane lighter momentarily to aneal the wire first.
I bend DA wire, often well past 90 degrees, without experiencing breakage and have never annealed it. I have found that I can even bend it several times before it does break. DA wire is usually my first choice because it does bend and HOLD its shape, yet is not easily bent by accident. My experience with Precision Scale wire is that it is "softer" and easier to bend by accident. After kicking around on my bench for a few months, there are no straight pieces of Precision wire!

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
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Brass Wire For Detailing

rgs0554
 

Hi, To expand upon the original query. Tichy Train Group in its CMA division Offers
phosphor bronze wire in .006, .008, .010, .012,.015, .020, .025 and .032 sizes. It comes in
approximately eight inch lengths. Each size is packed several pieces in a protective tube. If
I remember correctly, a direct order to Tichy is discounted 20% and receives free shipping if
it totals over $50. A wire order can be combined with kits and detail pieces order to reach
the $50 amount. I prefer phosphor bronze to brass wire because it is considerably more
ductile than brass. I'ver never had it breaking while bending as I've experienced with brass
wire. Regards, Don Smith


Re: brass wire for detailing

Paul Imhoff <pjimhoff@...>
 

Small Parts service, and shipping is excellent. Try them, you wont be disappointed.

Paul Imhoff
lurking in Baton Rouge

----- Original Message -----
From: Don Burn
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, March 02, 2007 7:00 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: brass wire for detailing


There is a company called Small Parts, Inc that sell brass and other wire
in various sizes through the Amazon website. Haven't tried them myself but
they seem to have a large variety.

Don Burn

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