Date   

Re: Reefer Hatches (Reefers Going To The Wesy Coast)

toddsyr <toddsyr@...>
 

The following site documnets the early beginnings of the W T Rawleigh Company.

http://www.stephcohs.org/rawleigh_kitchen.htm

I just thought you might like to know of the company from it's beginnings.

Todd K. Stearns

----- Original Message -----
From: Bob Chaparro
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, March 21, 2007 2:52 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Reefer Hatches (Reefers Going To The West Coast)
Chet- What were the W T Rawleigh products going to the west coast?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro
Mission Viejo/Hemet, CA

==========================================
> When I went to work in 1960 on the IC, I always observed what was
> going on at the Chicago Produce Terminal (CPT) as our train passed
> by. There was always several piles of body ice alongside cars, and
> broken cases and pallets lying on the ground next to open cars.
Don't
> know if they were picked up and disposed of, or thrown back into
the
> cars after they was unloaded. The IC (and ATSF) switchmen who
worked
> the CPT jobs never had to go into the produce department at their
> local grocery stores. Mty PFE's were used at Freeport, IL for
years,
> for loading W T Rawleigh products going to the west coast. The
> carmen inspected the mty's to find the cleanest and driest cars for
> this loading.
>
> Chet French
> Dixon, IL
>


Re: Reefer Hatches (Reefers Going To The Wesy Coast)

Tim O'Connor
 

think "Proctor & Gamble" when you think of W T Rawleigh.

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: "Bob Chaparro" <thecitrusbelt@...>
Chet- What were the W T Rawleigh products going to the west coast?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro
Mission Viejo/Hemet, CA


Re: Reefer Hatches (Reefers Going To The Wesy Coast)

Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

Chet- What were the W T Rawleigh products going to the west coast?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro
Mission Viejo/Hemet, CA

==========================================
When I went to work in 1960 on the IC, I always observed what was
going on at the Chicago Produce Terminal (CPT) as our train passed
by. There was always several piles of body ice alongside cars, and
broken cases and pallets lying on the ground next to open cars.
Don't
know if they were picked up and disposed of, or thrown back into
the
cars after they was unloaded. The IC (and ATSF) switchmen who
worked
the CPT jobs never had to go into the produce department at their
local grocery stores. Mty PFE's were used at Freeport, IL for
years,
for loading W T Rawleigh products going to the west coast. The
carmen inspected the mty's to find the cleanest and driest cars for
this loading.

Chet French
Dixon, IL


Re: Reefer Hatches

Chet French <cfrench@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Russ Strodtz wrote:
As to cleaning the customers would only do as much cleaning as
was
necessary to unload the car. These paved areas would gradually
start
to get cluttered with pallets, broken crates, and whatever and
would
have to be periodically cleaned up. The road that switched the
terminal would not be interested in doing anything other than
making
sure all the doors were closed . . .
Russ is exactly right. And often broken crates, rotted or
unsalable produce, and all kinds of other trash were simply thrown
into
the cars and the doors fastened. The PFE managers I interviewed
spoke
rather strongly about the amounts of trash removed from cars at PFE
cleaning tracks. I heard nothing about any effort to clean them
sooner
than their arrival at PFE facilities, usually North Platte on the
UP
and Tucson on the SP. There might also be body ice in the car, and
if
drains had become blocked, ice remaining in the bunkers. (The ice
was
quickly removed by hot water from hoses.)
PFE and SFRD had many active agents in eastern cities,
but
their job was to make sure empties were promptly moved westward
(and
not confiscated), not to check on open ice hatches or to clean
cars.
Certainly for PFE, all decisions on cleaning and repair were made
when
the cars arrived at a PFE facility.
When I went to work in 1960 on the IC, I always observed what was
going on at the Chicago Produce Terminal (CPT) as our train passed
by. There was always several piles of body ice alongside cars, and
broken cases and pallets lying on the ground next to open cars. Don't
know if they were picked up and disposed of, or thrown back into the
cars after they was unloaded. The IC (and ATSF) switchmen who worked
the CPT jobs never had to go into the produce department at their
local grocery stores. Mty PFE's were used at Freeport, IL for years,
for loading W T Rawleigh products going to the west coast. The
carmen inspected the mty's to find the cleanest and driest cars for
this loading.

Chet French
Dixon, IL


Re: Riding the Rails DVD movie

Phil Clark
 

Presumably: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120017/
<http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120017/>

Thanks for the 'heads up'. I'll order one from www.amazon.co.uk
<http://www.amazon.co.uk> but I am reminded that I must check my
Samsung DVD player (origin Malaysia). The TV is multi-region. Amazon
say; Region 1 encoding (requires a North American or multi-region DVD
player and NTSC compatible TV.

Phil Clark, ALTON UK.

--- In STMFC@..., "Dean Payne" deanpayne@ wrote:
I watched a documentary called "Riding the Rails" on DVD last
night. I got it out of the Cuyahoga County Library, check your
local library for availabilty...Dean Payne
A second viewing shows 2 Morrell Ham reefers (ala Branchline #1317)
followed by a truss rod reefer with the "Morrell Pride" ... > Dean
Payne


RES: Going Bananas ...

Marcelo Lordeiro <mrcustom@...>
 

Jim ,
I suggest you contact John Kirchner ; I believe he knows almost everything
about banana transportation.
You can contact him via his site www.bananacarril.com .
He models SP , SP de M , N de M and Brasilian railroads.
Marcelo Lordeiro


-----Mensagem original-----
De: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]Em nome de Jim
Betz
Enviada em: quarta-feira, 21 de março de 2007 13:01
Para: STMFC@...
Assunto: [STMFC] Going Bananas ...


My understanding is that the majority of the bananas came in thru
East Coast and Gulf ports - originally - and then that there were
changes in shipping and in the overall demand (due as much to population
as anything else) and so some of the bananas started to be shipped
to West Coast ports via the Panama Canal. As population grew in the
West more and more of the supply of bananas to the West coast came
to the West Coast via the canal. Then, later on, additional sources of
bananas started to be used that were shipped to the U.S. from Pacific
ports. With modern refridgeration bananas and other perishables can
be shipped by almost any route because they are loaded into containers
that each have their own temperature control mechanisms.
Enough general overview - I know that there were cars such as the
W.I.F. cars that at least advertised bananas - but those cars were
box cars. Were bananas shipped without refridgeration in the
STMFC era?
- Jim in San Jose




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07:52


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Re: Going Bananas ...

mcindoefalls
 

--- In STMFC@..., Jim Betz <jimbetz@...> wrote:

My understanding is that the majority of the bananas came in thru
East Coast and Gulf ports. . . Were bananas shipped without
refrigeration. . .

I grew up in Weehawken, NJ, )in New York Harbor) in sight of the
United Fruit Co. banana facility (of which I had a birds-eye view from
atop the Palisades).

NYC had an ice plant and two icing platforms in Weehawken, one
platform was adjacent to the pier. I never saw anything but 40-foot
steel reefers at the United Fruit facility. The majority were MDT
cars, with a few NRC's. This was in the d----l era, early sixties, but
I doubt that the operation had changed much since the end of steam.

The ice plant was located near the 48th Street tunnel portal and ice
was moved to the icing platform near the banana pier, a half mile or
so, in a couple of 40-foot wood MDT cars. I don't clearly recall, but
I'd bet the cars were iced in warmer weather and not in the winter.
I've read that the optimum temperature for storage and transport of
bananas is 56-58 degrees, so perhaps not much ice was used.

Walt Lankenau


Re: Going Bananas ...

ljack70117@...
 

Never put bananas in the refrigerator means after they are ripened. They will turn black. Ship bananas at 45/50 degrees while they are green if you want to keep them green. Higher degrees will start them ripening.
I worked in a produce house in Salina Ks. We had three banana rooms I unloaded a car into the first room and it was set at 45 degrees and the bananas were green
The second room was full and was holding at 45 degrees.
The third room was set at 70 degrees and the bananas were ripe and were being sold to the stores. When that room got down to a two day supply room 2 was raised to 70 degrees and the bananas started to ripen. It took about two days to ripen them.
When room one one went mty it was set at 45 degrees and I unloaded the next cat to arrive into it. And the whole routine started again.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@...
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left

On Mar 21, 2007, at 12:48 PM, Miller, Andrew S. wrote:

Chiquita used to say:
"NEVER put bananas in the refrigerator!"
I assume she had box cars in mind.

regards,
Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Jim Betz
Sent: Wednesday, March 21, 2007 12:01 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Going Bananas ...

My understanding is that the majority of the bananas came in thru
East Coast and Gulf ports - originally - and then that there were
changes in shipping and in the overall demand (due as much to
population
as anything else) and so some of the bananas started to be shipped
to West Coast ports via the Panama Canal. As population grew in the
West more and more of the supply of bananas to the West coast came
to the West Coast via the canal. Then, later on, additional sources of
bananas started to be used that were shipped to the U.S. from Pacific
ports. With modern refridgeration bananas and other perishables can
be shipped by almost any route because they are loaded into containers
that each have their own temperature control mechanisms.
Enough general overview - I know that there were cars such as the
W.I.F. cars that at least advertised bananas - but those cars were
box cars. Were bananas shipped without refridgeration in the
STMFC era?
- Jim in San Jose




Yahoo! Groups Links






Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: Going Bananas ...

Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...>
 

Au contraire, Andy,

Whatever Chiquita said, bananas always went in refrigerator cars on the
Illinois Central, for as long as they were shipped out of New Orleans (until
the mid 1960s, that is). The reefers (I remember mostly steel NRC cars with
orange sides, brown roof and ends, and green IC diamonds) were iced at the
IC's Stuyvesant Yard on the Mississippi riverfront, and re-iced (as needed)
at Fulton, Ken., on their way north. At Fulton, foremen checked the
temperature of bananas in each car and adjusted the ice loading to keep the
fruit within a specified temperature range. But remember, the bananas were
shipped green and the idea was not to allow them to ripen until sold.

So long,

Andy

Andy Sperandeo
Executive Editor
Model Railroader magazine
asperandeo@...
262-796-8776, ext. 461
FAX 262-796-1142


Re: Going Bananas ...

Miller, Andrew S. <asmiller@...>
 

Chiquita used to say:
"NEVER put bananas in the refrigerator!"
I assume she had box cars in mind.

regards,
Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Jim Betz
Sent: Wednesday, March 21, 2007 12:01 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Going Bananas ...

My understanding is that the majority of the bananas came in thru
East Coast and Gulf ports - originally - and then that there were
changes in shipping and in the overall demand (due as much to
population
as anything else) and so some of the bananas started to be shipped
to West Coast ports via the Panama Canal. As population grew in the
West more and more of the supply of bananas to the West coast came
to the West Coast via the canal. Then, later on, additional sources of
bananas started to be used that were shipped to the U.S. from Pacific
ports. With modern refridgeration bananas and other perishables can
be shipped by almost any route because they are loaded into containers
that each have their own temperature control mechanisms.
Enough general overview - I know that there were cars such as the
W.I.F. cars that at least advertised bananas - but those cars were
box cars. Were bananas shipped without refridgeration in the
STMFC era?
- Jim in San Jose




Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Ice Reefer Hatches

Frank Greene
 

"Anthony Thompson" <thompson@...> wrote:
Dave, are you reading all the posts?

Read? Who's got time to read? I've gotta' say somethin' or folks'll think I'm not paying attention!

Charleston, SC.

Frank Greene
Memphis, TN


C&NW's Wood Street Terminal/ The Potato Yard

Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

While reviewing the June 2002 issue of RAILMODEL JOURNAL I came
across a 1920s photo of C&NW's Wood Street Terminal in Chicago. This
facility also was known as "The Potato Yard".

The image shows scores of reefers and an ice deck. There is no
storage terminal building visible. Instead, the tracks for unloading
reefers are in pairs with space between each pair of tracks for
trucks to be loaded directly from the cars.

Fortunately, you won't have to look for the magazine as one can
locate the same image on the C&NW Historical Society's website. The
images can be seen at:

http://www.cnwhs.org/memberphotos/displayimage.php?
album=search&cat=0&pos=0

or

http://tinyurl.com/32vlnk

Bob Chaparro
Moderator
Citrus Industry Modeling Group
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/citrusmodeling/


Re: U of Cal library

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:
There are some additional railroad photos. Searches using the terms "railroad", "santa fe", "southern pacific", "union pacific", "freight", "station", etc will bring them out.
I would say there are MANY additional railroad photos.

Many of the captions appear to be correct but there are some errors as to places, dates and details that I recognized.
Let them know, Bob. We should all share knowledge when it can help with something like this. Many photos also have no caption at all. If you know something about location or subject, let them know.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Going Bananas ...

Jim Betz
 

My understanding is that the majority of the bananas came in thru
East Coast and Gulf ports - originally - and then that there were
changes in shipping and in the overall demand (due as much to population
as anything else) and so some of the bananas started to be shipped
to West Coast ports via the Panama Canal. As population grew in the
West more and more of the supply of bananas to the West coast came
to the West Coast via the canal. Then, later on, additional sources of
bananas started to be used that were shipped to the U.S. from Pacific
ports. With modern refridgeration bananas and other perishables can
be shipped by almost any route because they are loaded into containers
that each have their own temperature control mechanisms.
Enough general overview - I know that there were cars such as the
W.I.F. cars that at least advertised bananas - but those cars were
box cars. Were bananas shipped without refridgeration in the
STMFC era?
- Jim in San Jose


Re: U of Cal library

Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

There are some additional railroad photos. Searches using the
terms "railroad", "santa fe", "southern pacific", "union
pacific", "freight", "station", etc will bring them out. I believe
there are 1,200 images attached to the term "railroad" and these
overlap the other terms. Many of the captions appear to be correct but
there are some errors as to places, dates and details that I recognized.


Bob Chaparro
Mission Viejo/Hemet

==========================================

--- In STMFC@..., "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., "Bob Chaparro" <thecitrusbelt@>
provided a link to
(http://www.calisphere.universityofcalifornia.edu/), a service of the
University of California Libraries.

Has anyone gone through the many other photos? Any other freight car
photos?

Ed


C&EI Wood Cabooses

asychis@...
 

In a message dated 3/21/2007 8:40:47 AM Central Daylight Time,
STMFC@... writes:

Perhaps it will also reveal some info on another C&EI caboose that
I've been searching for,....a 4 window (per-side), wood, center-
coupola, truss-rod type. This type caboose seems to appear on pages
13 & 38, in Edward DeRouin's book, "C&EI RR In Color", but the CEIHS
has yet been unable to identify it. I used to see this type caboose
on the C&EI Clearing-freights in Chicago, in the early 1960's.

Paul, the book does not cover C&EI wood cabooses in great detail. At least
in the text. The rosters are there for as many C&EI cabooses as I could find.
Do you have numbers for these wood cabooses you are interested in?

Jerry



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Re: Digest Number 3549

asychis@...
 

In a message dated 3/20/2007 6:27:03 PM Central Daylight Time,
STMFC@... writes:

While it has nothing to do with waycars I thought the SLSF
was the road that had been involved with the C&EI for many
years.

Correct. Prior to the MoPac's interest in gaining entry to Chicago, there
wasn't a whole lot if interaction between the two roads.

Jerry Michels



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Re: Ice Reefer Hatches

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Dave Powell wrote:
Don’t forget New Orleans. LA.
Dave, are you reading all the posts?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Ice Reefer Hatches

David Powell <daveydiesel@...>
 

Don’t forget New Orleans. LA. Dave Powell

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Schuyler Larrabee
Sent: Tuesday, March 20, 2007 11:24 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Ice Reefer Hatches



Seattle was a significant banana port; so were San Francisco and
Los Angeles on the west coast. They also came in for a time at
Philadelphia.

Tony Thompson Editor
Boston and New York, too.

SGL


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Re: Ice Reefer Hatches

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Seattle was a significant banana port; so were San Francisco and
Los Angeles on the west coast. They also came in for a time at
Philadelphia.

Tony Thompson Editor
Boston and New York, too.

SGL

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