Date   

Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

My current understanding is that virtually all, if not all of the "primer" paints available to us as modelers are nothing more than just another color or formulation of ordinary paint. However, I note that some, most, or all (??) listers are still reporting that they are still applying a "primer" coat prior to any "finishing" coats of paint. Now, I can understand why on occasion I might like to apply a nice gray coat of primer- 1) to better enable a transition to a lighter color finish coat without paint buildup; or 2) to make it easier to physically handle a model prior to any finish coating, but-- what else?

Although I have not looked lately, Scalecoat has specifically noted that with the use of their paints, no primer is necessary- and I have followed their advice in this regard successfully for some time.

Denny
--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


Re: NYC Steel Boxcars, New Models?

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., Ted Culotta <tculotta@...> wrote:
I think Richard got the names a little mixed up as keeping track of
these things is not easy, given the structure of the companies (see
next sentence.) Sun is a company that does consulting, primarily to
BLI/PCM/Factory Direct, who we all know sells through dealers and
direct. These NYC cars will be offered, I think, by Precision Craft
when they are released.
Are these the companies that sell or sold PRR stock cars and N&W
hoppers?

Ed


Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting

Bruce Smith
 

On Apr 10, 2007, at 7:54 AM, ljack70117@... wrote:

The EPA made the company doing the Statue of Liberty use Baking soda.
Of course you can buy Aluminum Oxide because it is used for things
other than blasting but they do not come into your home and stop you
from hurting yourself. I talk to the company that did our condo
( because I am a director on the board) It can not be used by them.
The directives are out there from the EPA.
Larry,

I think that you may be confusing large scale, exterior, uncontained abrasive blasting with smaller applications. It has nothing to do with private vs commercial use. Aluminum oxide is both sold to and used by many businesses for "grit blasting" applications.

Your original statement was:
EPA will not allow the use of the Aluminum Oxide any more.
This is patently false. It may well be that Aluminum Oxide has been banned for some applications, but it is most certainly available and LEGAL to sell and use for the application we are discussing, abrasive blasting of models.

Baking soda is definitely a viable alternative, better for the environment if use in an open system and somewhat safer if accidentally inhaled, but frankly, I wouldn't use EITHER for grit blasting a model in an "open system" without serious respiratory protection (hence I use a completely enclosed booth).

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Re: NYC Steel Boxcars, New Models?

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

I think Richard got the names a little mixed up as keeping track of these things is not easy, given the structure of the companies (see next sentence.) Sun is a company that does consulting, primarily to BLI/PCM/Factory Direct, who we all know sells through dealers and direct. These NYC cars will be offered, I think, by Precision Craft when they are released. As Richard intimated, this project has been going for some time now. BLI/PCM had some other more pressing things on their collective plate so this ended up on the back burner for awhile.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
645 Tanner Marsh Road, Guilford, CT 06437
info@...
www.speedwitch.com
(203) 747-0190 ***NEW NUMBER***


Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting

ljack70117@...
 

The EPA made the company doing the Statue of Liberty use Baking soda. Of course you can buy Aluminum Oxide because it is used for things other than blasting but they do not come into your home and stop you from hurting yourself. I talk to the company that did our condo ( because I am a director on the board) It can not be used by them. The directives are out there from the EPA.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@...
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left

On Apr 10, 2007, at 8:28 AM, Don Burn wrote:

Larry,

When was the EPA rule? My wife is a glass artist and still gets
aluminum oxide for her blasting?

Don Burn

----- Original Message -----
From: <ljack70117@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2007 8:22 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting


EPA will not allow the use of the Aluminum Oxide any more. The Statue
of Liberty was done with Baking soda. The work done on our walks in
our condo assoc. was also done with baking soda.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@...
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left




On Apr 10, 2007, at 7:54 AM, James F. Brewer wrote:

I currently use Aluminum Oxide; I've purchased a bag of Baking
Soda, per the suggestion of another list member, and intend to try
it out eventually.

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD

----- Original Message -----
From: radius158
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, April 09, 2007 9:32 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting


What material do you sand balst with ? thankd dg

--- In STMFC@..., "James F. Brewer" <jfbrewer@...>
wrote:

Doug,

This is one of those topics that everyone will have a slightly
differing opinion and approach.

I routinely grit blast my resin models, wash them and let them air
dry before spraying a grey primer on them. For plastic kits, if I've
made a lot of modifications (i.e. filled holes, added rivets,
removed
rivets, repair surface defects, etc.) I still usually give these
cars
a light grit blasting; if it is a car that really didn't require
those types of modifications, I have been wiping them down with a
cotton ball soaked in isopropyl alcohol; I then let the car air dry,
and apply a grey paint to them. I think the grey paint will give
your finish coat a better "color."

Regardless, I always grit blast the plastic trucks; you can mask
off the holes for the axles, or otherwise plug them to prevent the
grit from getting in there; I usually just blast the truck, as is,
then put them in a jar of water with a drop of detergent and stick
that in my ultrasonic cleaner. This usually gets all the grit out of
those tiny areas and recesses on the trucks; I then use the tool
sold
by ReBoxx to ream out the axle bearing holes. I think grit blasting
the plastic trucks gives a great weathered look for our steam era
freight cars.

YMMV

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD
----- Original Message -----
From: radius158
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, April 09, 2007 7:23 PM
Subject: [STMFC] preparation of styrene kits for painting


Is there a reason to 1)sandblast a styrene kit before painting or
2) prime a styrene kit if it is already grey ???? such as an
intermountain kit
thanks Doug Gardner













Yahoo! Groups Links





__________ NOD32 2176 (20070410) Information __________

This message was checked by NOD32 antivirus system.
http://www.eset.com



Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting

James F. Brewer <jfbrewer@...>
 

I have a one horsepower compressor with storage tank; for general cleaning, I usually spray the grit at 20 psi, or a little less; if I'm just trying to remove some lettering (i.e. change the car number), I usually set the gauge at about 8 psi.

The compressor I am using is a little undersized for the blast booth; when doing a car or some trucks, it usually is not a problem; however, if I want to blast several models at once, or have a particularly large project (recently blasted a friend's B&O EM1 brass loco) it does tax the compressor. I'll eventually upgrade the compressor.

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD

----- Original Message -----
From: Paul & Bernice Hillman
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2007 8:18 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting


--- In STMFC@..., "James F. Brewer" <jfbrewer@...> wrote:
>
> I currently use Aluminum Oxide; I've purchased a bag of Baking Soda,
per the suggestion of another list member, and intend to try it out
eventually.
>
> Jim Brewer
> Glenwood MD
***********************************************************************

I have a Paasche "Air Eraser"/Sandblaster, but haven't used it for
quite some time. I'm getting all my "stuff" set up again and even need
to get another air-compressor. But what PSI have you been using for
sandblasting? I tried using Aluminum Oxide only before, but I recall
not getting good results.

The compressor I had was a very small one for spray-painting, and I
think it may not have produced enough PSI or Volume.

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting

Marcelo Lordeiro <mrcustom@...>
 

Doug,

I sandblast all styrene models before painting . I use 40 lbs pressure and the finest grain available.

The primer is used not to make the model gray ( you can find primers in other colours ) but to prepare the surface to receive the paint.

Different material need specific primers.

I use to paint all plastic models gray to check if the surface is perfect.

Marcelo Lordeiro

----- Original Message -----
From: radius158
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, April 09, 2007 8:23 PM
Subject: [STMFC] preparation of styrene kits for painting


Is there a reason to 1)sandblast a styrene kit before painting or
2) prime a styrene kit if it is already grey ???? such as an
intermountain kit
thanks Doug Gardner






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Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting

Bruce Smith
 

On Apr 10, 2007, at 7:22 AM, ljack70117@... wrote:

EPA will not allow the use of the Aluminum Oxide any more. The Statue
of Liberty was done with Baking soda. The work done on our walks in
our condo assoc. was also done with baking soda.
Larry,

BS! (that stands of course for baking soda, not the other one) <VBG> I can go to Harbor Freight and buy Aluminum Oxide by the 25 pound tub!

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting

Don Burn
 

Larry,

When was the EPA rule? My wife is a glass artist and still gets aluminum oxide for her blasting?

Don Burn

----- Original Message -----
From: <ljack70117@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2007 8:22 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting


EPA will not allow the use of the Aluminum Oxide any more. The Statue
of Liberty was done with Baking soda. The work done on our walks in
our condo assoc. was also done with baking soda.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@...
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left




On Apr 10, 2007, at 7:54 AM, James F. Brewer wrote:

I currently use Aluminum Oxide; I've purchased a bag of Baking
Soda, per the suggestion of another list member, and intend to try
it out eventually.

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD

----- Original Message -----
From: radius158
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, April 09, 2007 9:32 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting


What material do you sand balst with ? thankd dg

--- In STMFC@..., "James F. Brewer" <jfbrewer@...>
wrote:

Doug,

This is one of those topics that everyone will have a slightly
differing opinion and approach.

I routinely grit blast my resin models, wash them and let them air
dry before spraying a grey primer on them. For plastic kits, if I've
made a lot of modifications (i.e. filled holes, added rivets,
removed
rivets, repair surface defects, etc.) I still usually give these
cars
a light grit blasting; if it is a car that really didn't require
those types of modifications, I have been wiping them down with a
cotton ball soaked in isopropyl alcohol; I then let the car air dry,
and apply a grey paint to them. I think the grey paint will give
your finish coat a better "color."

Regardless, I always grit blast the plastic trucks; you can mask
off the holes for the axles, or otherwise plug them to prevent the
grit from getting in there; I usually just blast the truck, as is,
then put them in a jar of water with a drop of detergent and stick
that in my ultrasonic cleaner. This usually gets all the grit out of
those tiny areas and recesses on the trucks; I then use the tool
sold
by ReBoxx to ream out the axle bearing holes. I think grit blasting
the plastic trucks gives a great weathered look for our steam era
freight cars.

YMMV

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD
----- Original Message -----
From: radius158
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, April 09, 2007 7:23 PM
Subject: [STMFC] preparation of styrene kits for painting


Is there a reason to 1)sandblast a styrene kit before painting or
2) prime a styrene kit if it is already grey ???? such as an
intermountain kit
thanks Doug Gardner













Yahoo! Groups Links





__________ NOD32 2176 (20070410) Information __________

This message was checked by NOD32 antivirus system.
http://www.eset.com


Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting

ljack70117@...
 

EPA will not allow the use of the Aluminum Oxide any more. The Statue of Liberty was done with Baking soda. The work done on our walks in our condo assoc. was also done with baking soda.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@...
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left

On Apr 10, 2007, at 7:54 AM, James F. Brewer wrote:

I currently use Aluminum Oxide; I've purchased a bag of Baking Soda, per the suggestion of another list member, and intend to try it out eventually.

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD

----- Original Message -----
From: radius158
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, April 09, 2007 9:32 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting


What material do you sand balst with ? thankd dg

--- In STMFC@..., "James F. Brewer" <jfbrewer@...> wrote:

Doug,

This is one of those topics that everyone will have a slightly
differing opinion and approach.

I routinely grit blast my resin models, wash them and let them air
dry before spraying a grey primer on them. For plastic kits, if I've
made a lot of modifications (i.e. filled holes, added rivets, removed
rivets, repair surface defects, etc.) I still usually give these cars
a light grit blasting; if it is a car that really didn't require
those types of modifications, I have been wiping them down with a
cotton ball soaked in isopropyl alcohol; I then let the car air dry,
and apply a grey paint to them. I think the grey paint will give
your finish coat a better "color."

Regardless, I always grit blast the plastic trucks; you can mask
off the holes for the axles, or otherwise plug them to prevent the
grit from getting in there; I usually just blast the truck, as is,
then put them in a jar of water with a drop of detergent and stick
that in my ultrasonic cleaner. This usually gets all the grit out of
those tiny areas and recesses on the trucks; I then use the tool sold
by ReBoxx to ream out the axle bearing holes. I think grit blasting
the plastic trucks gives a great weathered look for our steam era
freight cars.

YMMV

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD
----- Original Message -----
From: radius158
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, April 09, 2007 7:23 PM
Subject: [STMFC] preparation of styrene kits for painting


Is there a reason to 1)sandblast a styrene kit before painting or
2) prime a styrene kit if it is already grey ???? such as an
intermountain kit
thanks Doug Gardner













Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting

Paul Hillman
 

--- In STMFC@..., "James F. Brewer" <jfbrewer@...> wrote:

I currently use Aluminum Oxide; I've purchased a bag of Baking Soda,
per the suggestion of another list member, and intend to try it out
eventually.

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD
***********************************************************************

I have a Paasche "Air Eraser"/Sandblaster, but haven't used it for
quite some time. I'm getting all my "stuff" set up again and even need
to get another air-compressor. But what PSI have you been using for
sandblasting? I tried using Aluminum Oxide only before, but I recall
not getting good results.

The compressor I had was a very small one for spray-painting, and I
think it may not have produced enough PSI or Volume.

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting

James F. Brewer <jfbrewer@...>
 

I currently use Aluminum Oxide; I've purchased a bag of Baking Soda, per the suggestion of another list member, and intend to try it out eventually.

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD

----- Original Message -----
From: radius158
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, April 09, 2007 9:32 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting


What material do you sand balst with ? thankd dg

--- In STMFC@..., "James F. Brewer" <jfbrewer@...> wrote:
>
> Doug,
>
> This is one of those topics that everyone will have a slightly
differing opinion and approach.
>
> I routinely grit blast my resin models, wash them and let them air
dry before spraying a grey primer on them. For plastic kits, if I've
made a lot of modifications (i.e. filled holes, added rivets, removed
rivets, repair surface defects, etc.) I still usually give these cars
a light grit blasting; if it is a car that really didn't require
those types of modifications, I have been wiping them down with a
cotton ball soaked in isopropyl alcohol; I then let the car air dry,
and apply a grey paint to them. I think the grey paint will give
your finish coat a better "color."
>
> Regardless, I always grit blast the plastic trucks; you can mask
off the holes for the axles, or otherwise plug them to prevent the
grit from getting in there; I usually just blast the truck, as is,
then put them in a jar of water with a drop of detergent and stick
that in my ultrasonic cleaner. This usually gets all the grit out of
those tiny areas and recesses on the trucks; I then use the tool sold
by ReBoxx to ream out the axle bearing holes. I think grit blasting
the plastic trucks gives a great weathered look for our steam era
freight cars.
>
> YMMV
>
> Jim Brewer
> Glenwood MD
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: radius158
> To: STMFC@...
> Sent: Monday, April 09, 2007 7:23 PM
> Subject: [STMFC] preparation of styrene kits for painting
>
>
> Is there a reason to 1)sandblast a styrene kit before painting or
> 2) prime a styrene kit if it is already grey ???? such as an
> intermountain kit
> thanks Doug Gardner
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


MKT SS BOXCAR #96241 - PHOTO POSTED

billkeene2004 <wakeene@...>
 

Hello Group,

I have posted a photo of MKT 96241 in a new album entitled MKT... for better or worse...
in Sloan Yellow paint.

For the record... the location is Bartlesville, Oklahoma. And the date is the summer of
1958.

Enjoy,
-- Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


Re: The Seaboard-Coast Line Modeler Magazine

golden1014
 

Thanks Elden. If I can get close to the quality of TKM, we'll be
doing well. Al Buchan is an old friend of mine and he got me all set
up with the documents--all we need now are writers. TKM is just
terrific--I look forward to it more than I do MR. I've just
completed my X29B per the TKM, Dec 06 and it came out great
(mandatory STMFC list content).

Yours Very Truly,
John

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL


--- In STMFC@..., "Gatwood, Elden J SAD "
<Elden.J.Gatwood@...> wrote:

Best wishes, John, on yours and the Society's new venture! We are
all
looking forward to learning more about these great railroads.



Elden Gatwood





________________________________

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On
Behalf Of John
Golden
Sent: Saturday, April 07, 2007 11:54 PM
To: stmfc@...; acl-sal-sclmodeler@...;
rpm-forum@...; abbuchan1@...; Larry Goolsby
Subject: [STMFC] The Seaboard-Coast Line Modeler Magazine



Gentlemen,

On behalf of the ACL-SAL Railroads Historical Society,
I'm pleased to announce that the Society will be
offering an on-line modeling magazine similar to the
PRR T&HS's "The Keystone Modeler".

The magazine will be called "The Seaboard-Coast Line
Modeler" and will cover prototype modeling of SAL,
ACL, SCL, Family Lines, GA RR, WofA, A&WP, Seaboard
System, and other affiliated lines in all eras and
scales. The quarterly magazine will be an official
publication of the Society, and like TKM will be
provided free of charge on the ACL-SAL Historical
Society web page. The S-CL Modeler will follow the
popular format of TKM, but unlike TKM we're initially
planning on a quarterly publication (unless we can
reasonably offer it more often).

I will serve as editor of the magazine. Justin May
will serve as Assistant Editor. Selection of the
magazine's editorial staff and regular column editors
is underway. I am currently soliciting articles for
the first issue, which I hope to publish in 45-60
days. All articles on modeling freight cars,
locomotives, right-of-way, structures, fixtures,
operations, etc. are welcome. As in TKM, the inclusion
of prototype photos, drawings, etc. is highly
encouraged with your articles, and since there is no
size limit to the articles or the S-CL Modeler magzine
you may include as many photos and/or drawings as you
feel is appropriate. You do not need to be a member of
the society to contribute.

Unfortunately, like TKM, we can not pay for articles
and they must be considered gratis (no payment or
perks is provided to staff). Our goal is to grow the
modeling community by sharing information, providing
an open forum for the detailed study of the prototype,
and providing in-depth prototype-oriented modeling
articles. Your expert knowledge and modeling
experience, tranformed into in-depth articles, will
help build the modeling community and introduce
modelers and historians to the Society and the
railroads it represents.

I'll announce the regular staff in about two weeks.
Until then, we need to get the ball rolling. If you'd
like to submit an article or if you'd like to discuss
submitting an article, please contact me at
Golden1014@... <mailto:Golden1014%40yahoo.com> .

There's much more to follow about the magazine in
coming months. Our sincere thanks to Al Buchan of the
PRR T&HS for helping us get this project off the
ground.

Yours Very Truly,

John Golden
Justin May

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL

http://www.pbase.com/golden1014 <http://www.pbase.com/golden1014>





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Corner Grabs (was Pittsburgh image collection)

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I emulate Tim here, but do be aware that PSC makes Really Tiny Eyebolts. I believe I have some with
an interior diameter of ~.008"and while I've not tried them, they might work out OK. Certanly
better than Northeaster Eye Pins (which I've seen used . . . ).

SGL

For steel running boards, advertisements in the 1951 and 1961 Car
Builder Cyc's all show eye bolts. However, HO scale eyebolts are just
too gigantic to represent these -- I think that is Tony's objection.
Personally I use a wire with a flattened end that I curl over the top
of the grab (a J-shape IOW). This looks more like the real
thing to me.

Tim O'Connor

The first image also shows a nice large eye-bolt at the
corner of the roof
grab. Is this the exception that proves the rule, Tony?
Viv


Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting

radius158
 

What material do you sand balst with ? thankd dg

--- In STMFC@..., "James F. Brewer" <jfbrewer@...> wrote:

Doug,

This is one of those topics that everyone will have a slightly
differing opinion and approach.

I routinely grit blast my resin models, wash them and let them air
dry before spraying a grey primer on them. For plastic kits, if I've
made a lot of modifications (i.e. filled holes, added rivets, removed
rivets, repair surface defects, etc.) I still usually give these cars
a light grit blasting; if it is a car that really didn't require
those types of modifications, I have been wiping them down with a
cotton ball soaked in isopropyl alcohol; I then let the car air dry,
and apply a grey paint to them. I think the grey paint will give
your finish coat a better "color."

Regardless, I always grit blast the plastic trucks; you can mask
off the holes for the axles, or otherwise plug them to prevent the
grit from getting in there; I usually just blast the truck, as is,
then put them in a jar of water with a drop of detergent and stick
that in my ultrasonic cleaner. This usually gets all the grit out of
those tiny areas and recesses on the trucks; I then use the tool sold
by ReBoxx to ream out the axle bearing holes. I think grit blasting
the plastic trucks gives a great weathered look for our steam era
freight cars.

YMMV

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD
----- Original Message -----
From: radius158
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, April 09, 2007 7:23 PM
Subject: [STMFC] preparation of styrene kits for painting


Is there a reason to 1)sandblast a styrene kit before painting or
2) prime a styrene kit if it is already grey ???? such as an
intermountain kit
thanks Doug Gardner





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: What kind of SFRD car is this?

charles slater
 

These two cars are post WWII rebuilds of the Rr-W,X,Y,2,3,4 class wood reefers. The car on the left is an Rr-46 class car numbered in the 9870-10869 series rebuilt in 1949. The car on the right is an Rr-43 class car #9250 from the series 8600-9368 rebuilt in 1947.
Both these classes of cars are available from Sunshine models
Happy Modeling
Charlie Slater




From: "Kurt Laughlin" <fleeta@...>
Reply-To: STMFC@...
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] What kind of SFRD car is this?
Date: Sun, 08 Apr 2007 21:02:06 -0400

This shot shows the team tracks at Monessen, PA in 1953.

http://images.library.pitt.edu/cgi-bin/i/image/image-idx?sid=d63d5aee3c821f4de56faaf344d6574c;xc=1;g=imls;c=rr;q1=freight;rgn1=ic_all;evl=full-image;quality=2;view=entry;subview=detail;lasttype=boolean;cc=rr;entryid=x-8223.3507.rr;viewid=3507RR.TIF;start=1;resnum=91

The car on the right is SFRD 3250 or 9250, the one on the left looks to be SFRD 15080.

TIA,
KL
----- Original Message -----
From: William Keene
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, April 08, 2007 6:25 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] M-K-T Yellow Box Cars


Hello Richard and all,

My family moved from Houston, Texas to Bartlesville, Oklahoma, in
January 1958. And sometime later that year, most likely in the summer,
I took a photo (not very good with a not very good and old Kodak 616
camera) of the MKT boxcar we are discussing... still in yellow. Well...
mostly yellow. There was a good deal of weathered gray sheathing
showing also. Most of the reweigh and maintenance info was done with
white lettering on mineral red splotches. And the car was not all that
dirty. It was the yellow and the wood door that first caught my eye and
prompted me to make the bike ride home to get my hand-me-down camera.
The car was in service and I believe was delivering a load of bricks.

This photo is posted on the MKT group but if there is a need I would be
happy to provide it to this group also. Just keep in mind that it is a
really poor photo taken by an 11-year old kid.

Cheers,
-- Bill Keene
Irvine, CA

On Apr 8, 2007, at 12:00 PM, Richard Hendrickson wrote:

> On Apr 7, 2007, at 8:39 PM, Brian J Carlson wrote:
>
> > I have always liked the chrome yellow color of these cars. However,
> I
> > am
> > trying to track these done in my ORER's to see how many were left in
> > 1957....
>
> > ....Also was the chrome yellow color still in use in 1957?
>
> No. I can date the adoption of the yellow paint exactly, as I happen
> to have photos of a mineral red car painted at the Katy's Denison, TX
> shops in 10-41 and a yellow car painted at Denison in 11-41. All the
> other photos I have of yellow cars have reweigh dates in the 1940s
> except for one car reweighed off-line at Minneapolis in 1-51. And I
> have a photo of a car freshly painted mineral red at Denison in 4-49,
> so by that date the Katy had gone back to painting the cars mineral
> red. Now, it's conceivable that a few cars painted yellow ca. 1948
> might have survived in that form until 1957, though by that time they
> would have been so dirty that the yellow wouldn't have been very
> visible. But modeling such a car would be stretching credibility to
> (if not past) the limit, IMHO.
>
> > Were the wooden doors replaced in later years?
>
> Apparently not. I have several photos of these cars dating from the
> 1960s and all still had their original wood doors.
>
> Richard Hendrickson
>
>
>
>







_________________________________________________________________
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Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting

James F. Brewer <jfbrewer@...>
 

Doug,

This is one of those topics that everyone will have a slightly differing opinion and approach.

I routinely grit blast my resin models, wash them and let them air dry before spraying a grey primer on them. For plastic kits, if I've made a lot of modifications (i.e. filled holes, added rivets, removed rivets, repair surface defects, etc.) I still usually give these cars a light grit blasting; if it is a car that really didn't require those types of modifications, I have been wiping them down with a cotton ball soaked in isopropyl alcohol; I then let the car air dry, and apply a grey paint to them. I think the grey paint will give your finish coat a better "color."

Regardless, I always grit blast the plastic trucks; you can mask off the holes for the axles, or otherwise plug them to prevent the grit from getting in there; I usually just blast the truck, as is, then put them in a jar of water with a drop of detergent and stick that in my ultrasonic cleaner. This usually gets all the grit out of those tiny areas and recesses on the trucks; I then use the tool sold by ReBoxx to ream out the axle bearing holes. I think grit blasting the plastic trucks gives a great weathered look for our steam era freight cars.

YMMV

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD

----- Original Message -----
From: radius158
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, April 09, 2007 7:23 PM
Subject: [STMFC] preparation of styrene kits for painting


Is there a reason to 1)sandblast a styrene kit before painting or
2) prime a styrene kit if it is already grey ???? such as an
intermountain kit
thanks Doug Gardner


Re: preparation of styrene kits for painting

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: radius158

Is there a reason to 1)sandblast a styrene kit before painting or
2) prime a styrene kit if it is already grey ???? such as an
intermountain kit
----- Original Message -----

I have been modeling (tanks, ships, and aircraft) for 35+ years and I had never heard of grit blasting a plastic kit until I started model railroading last year. I have never had a problem with adhesion of enamel or acrylic model paints on either styrene or polyurethane resin _so long as_ the the kits were properly cleaned immediately before painting (gentle washing with dish detergent and and old, soft toothbrush, followed by a rinse and air dry). Likewise, while priming is not uncommon, I think it just hides detail and is unnecessary with proper preparation. I only prime surfaces that I've worked or modified to make sure there are no seams, cavities, or glue gobs, and even then I use the final color or another shade from the same line to contrast with the plastic. Most of this paint is removed anyway during final wet sanding. I would never use one of the "primer" paints - which seem to be quite thick - on plastic.

The only issues I've had have been with vinyl tank tracks or vehicle tires and some metals. A scrubbing wash of the vinyl with mineral spirits followed by a stiff detergent scrubbing seems to have cured that problem, while metals can do with a light 600 grit sanding followed by a solvent/detergent wash. Acrylic paints also seem to stick to metals better than enamels, for some reason.

I will admit that there have been a few kits back in the '80s and early '90s from the old Warsaw Pact countries and China made from some unknown polymer that felt greasy even after solvent washing and would not hold solvent cements, super glue, or epoxy - let alone paint. Howeve, I doubt you'll be running across any of them.

KL


Re: What kind of SFRD car is this?

Russ Strodtz <sheridan@...>
 

Kurt,

What I find the most interesting item in this photo
is the location of the switch stand in the foreground.

Since it is still in the roadway it does not seem to
have required such an awkward setup which would have
required a homemade rod and such. It could also have
been placed on the other side of the switch but we
can't see that area so there's no indication of what
is over there.

The lines and big "X" on the pavement tend to indicate
that they don't want trucks down in that area anyway.

Russ Strodtz

----- Original Message -----
From: Kurt Laughlin
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, 08 April, 2007 20:02
Subject: [STMFC] What kind of SFRD car is this?


This shot shows the team tracks at Monessen, PA in 1953.

http://images.library.pitt.edu/cgi-bin/i/image/image-idx?sid=d63d5aee3c821f4de56faaf344d6574c;xc=1;g=imls;c=rr;q1=freight;rgn1=ic_all;evl=full-image;quality=2;view=entry;subview=detail;lasttype=boolean;cc=rr;entryid=x-8223.3507.rr;viewid=3507RR.TIF;start=1;resnum=91

The car on the right is SFRD 3250 or 9250, the one on the left
looks to be SFRD 15080.

TIA,
KL

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