Date   

Re: ADMIN: Order in the STMFC!

destron@...
 

Perhaps various limitations might also be kept in mind, be they financial
or whatever else. Some things aren't available to some people. I try to
model as accurately as possible... but so far, I haven't figured out how
to scratchbuild an Equipco brake wheel, so I use what's available: either
the wheel found on MicroTrains HOn3 cars, or some Ajax wheels I found,
nominally for N scale, but which are a bit oversized.

If someone were to look at one of my scratchbuilt cars and then say it has
the wrong brakewheel, I'd likely punch them in the nose. And then tell him
to build the wheel for me - to micrometer precision, of course. With
whatever wording is stamped on them, to *precise* scale size, and legibly!
;)

Frank Valoczy


Re: ADMIN: Order in the STMFC!

rfederle@...
 

Well said,

I model as accurately as I want to. Where I stop is where I feel it is good enough. I have not "shown" model and might never show. I enjoy this group for the information and help it provides. A favorite period for me is the 50's in to the early 60's. Those final days of steam and the coming proliferation of first generation diesels.

This group has spark interest for me and led to wider web searches. If I want to hear arguements I could stay at work or turn on the news.

Robert Federle
---- Mike Brock <brockm@...> wrote:

Bang! Bang! Bang! [ Most judges seem to bang their gavel three times when
they want order in the court room ]. There WILL be order in the STMFC.

I see messages referring to the terms "elitist", "bozo", "rivet counter",
etc., etc. in messages that are clearly out of scope. If you happen to know
of an elitist box car, by all means tell us. If you happen to know of a
member or non member whom you believe to be a "bozo", "elitist", "vestie" or
"rivet counter" and you just have to announce it to the world, find another
group in which to do it.

Note the STMFC rules:

"The purpose of the group is to discuss all aspects of North American
standard gauge freight cars of the steam era [ 1900-1960 ]. The objectives
include the sharing of
information about railroad freight cars including their operation, cargos,
distribution and the various techniques of building
models of them. Emphasis is to be placed on the study of the prototype with
a goal of producing models of them with as great a degree of accuracy as
possible."

Obviously, the objective of the STMFC is to produce models with as great a
degree of accuracy as possible. If others complain about this...too bad.
Personally, I could not care less and I would suggest the same attitude to
the members. So far as I know...I have not suffered from any blows from
those not striving for accuracy. Obviously, we all won't reach the same
level of accuracy with our models regardless of whether or not we build them
or buy them. Hence, even though we may strive for more accuracy, others may
strive harder and reach a higher degree of accuracy. And, of course, some of
our models may reach a higher degree than others. I have two Bowser covered
hoppers of the same RR, one with replaced grabs, one with thicker factory
grabs. Horrors! Actually, I don't care. Someone noted this recently and
pointed it out. My response was..."And?" Did I take offense? Of course not.
Why should I? During Prototype Rails this last year I displayed some resin
cars. Only when I was returning them to the layout did I realize that some
lacked coupler levers. OHMYGOSH! I was stunned...for 3 seconds...after which
I forgot about it.

The point is, the STMFC pursues accuracy in models of steam era frt cars. At
no time does it demean those who do not. At the same time, accuracy IS an
objective...although not a requirement. If you are not interested in
pursuing accuracy, the STMFC is probably not the place for you. OTOH, just
because others might achieve more accuracy than you is no reason to be
disturbed, upset or bothered. We are all in that boat in that regard.

So...let us get back within scope...steam era frt cars. BTW, I DID find the
keys to Moderate Jail.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner




ADMIN: Order in the STMFC!

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Bang! Bang! Bang! [ Most judges seem to bang their gavel three times when they want order in the court room ]. There WILL be order in the STMFC.

I see messages referring to the terms "elitist", "bozo", "rivet counter", etc., etc. in messages that are clearly out of scope. If you happen to know of an elitist box car, by all means tell us. If you happen to know of a member or non member whom you believe to be a "bozo", "elitist", "vestie" or "rivet counter" and you just have to announce it to the world, find another group in which to do it.

Note the STMFC rules:

"The purpose of the group is to discuss all aspects of North American
standard gauge freight cars of the steam era [ 1900-1960 ]. The objectives
include the sharing of
information about railroad freight cars including their operation, cargos,
distribution and the various techniques of building
models of them. Emphasis is to be placed on the study of the prototype with
a goal of producing models of them with as great a degree of accuracy as
possible."

Obviously, the objective of the STMFC is to produce models with as great a degree of accuracy as possible. If others complain about this...too bad. Personally, I could not care less and I would suggest the same attitude to the members. So far as I know...I have not suffered from any blows from those not striving for accuracy. Obviously, we all won't reach the same level of accuracy with our models regardless of whether or not we build them or buy them. Hence, even though we may strive for more accuracy, others may strive harder and reach a higher degree of accuracy. And, of course, some of our models may reach a higher degree than others. I have two Bowser covered hoppers of the same RR, one with replaced grabs, one with thicker factory grabs. Horrors! Actually, I don't care. Someone noted this recently and pointed it out. My response was..."And?" Did I take offense? Of course not. Why should I? During Prototype Rails this last year I displayed some resin cars. Only when I was returning them to the layout did I realize that some lacked coupler levers. OHMYGOSH! I was stunned...for 3 seconds...after which I forgot about it.

The point is, the STMFC pursues accuracy in models of steam era frt cars. At no time does it demean those who do not. At the same time, accuracy IS an objective...although not a requirement. If you are not interested in pursuing accuracy, the STMFC is probably not the place for you. OTOH, just because others might achieve more accuracy than you is no reason to be disturbed, upset or bothered. We are all in that boat in that regard.

So...let us get back within scope...steam era frt cars. BTW, I DID find the keys to Moderate Jail.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: Houser Collection

Mike Fortney
 

Charlie sells his prints shot by him or his father only via eBay. He
does sell repeat prints once in a while, again only on eBay.

FWIW, he gave the Illinois Traction Society permission to publish his
IT shots in "The Flyer" with, of course, proper credit given.

Mike Fortney
ITS

--- In STMFC@..., "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@...> wrote:

Larry Kline wrote:
"I wrote to Charles Houser offering to buy a print of a photo that had
just been sold on ebay. He replied that he is not willing to sell
prints to order. Has anyone else had a similar exchange with him?"

At least you got an answer out of him. I tried writing to obtain
permission to publish a photo in an article and never got a reply.


Ben Hom


Re: Houser Collection

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Larry Kline wrote:
"I wrote to Charles Houser offering to buy a print of a photo that had
just been sold on ebay. He replied that he is not willing to sell
prints to order. Has anyone else had a similar exchange with him?"

At least you got an answer out of him. I tried writing to obtain
permission to publish a photo in an article and never got a reply.


Ben Hom


Re: Houser Collection

Larry Kline
 

Frank Valoczy asked:
Does anyone know what/who the "Houser collection" is, and how one might
contact the owner of this collection of photos?

Tim O'Connor replied:
Charles Houser
P.O. Box 314
Macungie, PA 18062-0314
United States
Charlie almost always has auctions on Ebay, mostly prints from his
negative/slide collection. His handle is "windsor74".

I wrote to Charles Houser offering to buy a print of a photo that had
just been sold on ebay. He replied that he is not willing to sell
prints to order. Has anyone else had a similar exchange with him?

Larry Kline
Pittsburgh, PA


Re: Levels of Bozosity

Paul <buygone@...>
 

Tom:



Very well stated, thank you.



Paul C. Koehler



_____

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
pullmanboss
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2007 8:10 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Levels of Bozosity



Ray has said he wished all this would stop and/or go away.
Unfortunately, there are people I know and respect flailing away at
each other because the original point has become confused. Maybe we
need a definition of terms because, Yea, We Are All Bozos at some
level. (Not all of what follows is tongue in cheek.)

I. The Entry Level Bozo: This fellow has many questions and
little knowledge. Everyone was an entry level bozo at some point, so
they should be treated with respect. They are the future of our
hobby. Treat them kindly. Answer their questions as if they've never
been asked before.

II. The Internet Bozo: Now we're getting into less likeable
characters. The internet bozo expects every question to be answered
instantly and will complain if it isn't. He will complain if the
response isn't a direct answer but a reference to another
information source. He will complain bitterly if the referenced
source isn't instantly available, and free.

III. The Secretive Bozo: Takes great satisfaction in knowing or
having something that others don't. Operates from the philosophy
of "Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to
fish and you've lost a customer." Will dispense his pearls of wisdom
only when it serves to demonstrate his superiority.

IV. The Herd Bozo: A dormant characteristic that surfaces when
in the presence of other herd bozos. Typically found at conventions,
public shows and on fan trips. Also known as "Vestie", the herd bozo
indulges in dress and behavior that would embarrass him were he not
in the presence of others of similar persuasion. For better or for
worse, for most of the general public the herd bozo is the public
face of our hobby.

V. The IgnorAnus (not an original term): The über bozo, the
ignoranus is both stupid and an.... well, you can figure it out. In
general terms, the ignoranus is someone who, through ignorance, envy
or malice, seeks to demean, diminish or destroy that which others
value but he neither values nor understands. Think of Turkish
gunners using the sphinx for target practice. Scorns advice, views
it as criticism. Is proud of his ignorance. Downplays the
accomplishments of others and would rather tear others down than
build himself up.

In the entire craftsman vs. RTR discussion we've paid little heed to
the fact that everyone who participates in this hobby deserves to
enjoy it however and at whatever level they wish. And to acknowledge
that as high-end modelers we will find ourselves on the fringe of
the market that results. Even so, our cadre of almost 1300 STMFC
souls encompasses manufacturers, importers, designers, consultants,
dealers, authors, editors and publishers, and we wield an influence
in the hobby way out of proportion to our numbers. We should take
pride in that and not be so concerned with the bozos. When it comes
right down to it, the second, third and fourth categories of bozos
are just annoying. It's only the fifth category, the ignoranus, that
can do damage.

I'm done now.

Tom Madden





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Levels of Bozosity

pullmanboss <tgmadden@...>
 

Tim, staying up late on Saturday night, asked:
So... which one am I, Tom?
Ah, grasshopper, do you seek information, or confirmation? Look deeply
into the mirror of bozosity... What see you?? A bozo? Perhaps not.
Perhaps.....a Clarabelle!?

We are all Bozo.

Tom Mmmmmmmmmmmm, who just scored a 3-pack of unbuilt Red Caboose L&NE
boxcar kits and is muy happy!


Re: Houser Collection

Tim O'Connor
 

Charles Houser
P.O. Box 314
Macungie, PA 18062-0314
United States

Charlie almost always has auctions on Ebay, mostly prints from his
negative/slide collection. His handle is "windsor74".

Tim O'Connor
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Does anyone know what/who the "Houser collection" is, and how one might
contact the owner of this collection of photos?
Frank Valoczy


Re: Levels of Bozosity

Tim O'Connor
 

Tom Madden wrote

I. The Entry Level Bozo
II. The Internet Bozo
III. The Secretive Bozo
IV. The Herd Bozo
V. The IgnorAnus
and recently also wrote

Tim B. o'Connor
B, in this case, obviously stands for Bozo.

So... which one am I, Tom?

Tim


Modeler/Craftsman/ Modeler Historian and questions

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Needless to say, the thread of subject "[STMFC] Modeler/Craftsman/ Modeler Historian and questions" is also terminated. While there may be multiple different sub groups within the "hobby" of model railroading, that fact has nothing to do with the goals of the STMFC except from perhaps a curiosity point of view. Various views have been expressed regarding the merits of craftsmanship models and RTR in this thread. Both are perfectly acceptable means of acquiring models as far as the STMFC is concerned. Thus, unless someone can demonstrate off group that there is more value to be added, the thread is terminated.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


ADMIN: Termination of Re: Re: Preweathered Model Comment

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

There have been quite a few messages today which are only remotely within scope of the STMFC. Ray Meyer writes:

"Selling what hobby? Collecting toy trains? If that's someone's bag, so be
it. But I guess I belong to a different hobby, one that prizes
craftsmanship (as I suspect you do). I never understood how someone can
take pride in something they bought."

Ray and others are certainly welcome to this view. I don't see any reason to continue to argue its merits since the thread merely points out that one can either build or purchase a model of a frt car. Both techniques are perfectly within the scope and goals of the STMFC. Therefore, this thread is now terminated. Members are, of course, welcome to contact me off group to argue in favor of continuing the thread.

Tom Madden speaks rather eloquently in message 21170 and I think I'll fall back on that message and his post of tonight. If there is one thing to be taken from his messages it is:

"Respect mine, and I'll respect yours." It would not be a mistake to apply that to other model railroaders.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Modeler/Craftsman/ Modeler Historian and questions

Jim Betz
 

Here's my take on -all- of this ...

If someone claims that his/her approach to modeling is "better"
than someone else's approach - whether or not they use terms that
talk about groups or individuals - that statement is "elitist".

To me you can promote your viewpoint - but if you do that in any
manner that smacks of "I'm better than you because ... " or "Our
way is the true way" ... then that statement is a form of elitism.

Furthermore - if you use terms such as "bozo" when you post you are
often either crossing the boundary or at best flirting
with it. And it doesn't matter much if you are labelling
an individual or a group - because most of the time it
seems like those who are referring to a group are doing
so simply because they don't want to get sent directly
moderate hell.

None of the prior posts on this topic have helped me in any way to be
motivated to do more modelling, to be more or less 'accurate' when I do
so, have advanced my knowledge of railroading or how to model same, or
have ... in any way ... contributed to what I understand as the reason
for the existence of this group. This is not fun and is not helping
me to be a better modeler.
- Jim Betz in San Jose

--
*****************************************************************
***** Too Many Trains, Not Enough Brains!!!
*****************************************************************


Levels of Bozosity

pullmanboss <tgmadden@...>
 

Ray has said he wished all this would stop and/or go away.
Unfortunately, there are people I know and respect flailing away at
each other because the original point has become confused. Maybe we
need a definition of terms because, Yea, We Are All Bozos at some
level. (Not all of what follows is tongue in cheek.)

I. The Entry Level Bozo: This fellow has many questions and
little knowledge. Everyone was an entry level bozo at some point, so
they should be treated with respect. They are the future of our
hobby. Treat them kindly. Answer their questions as if they've never
been asked before.

II. The Internet Bozo: Now we're getting into less likeable
characters. The internet bozo expects every question to be answered
instantly and will complain if it isn't. He will complain if the
response isn't a direct answer but a reference to another
information source. He will complain bitterly if the referenced
source isn't instantly available, and free.

III. The Secretive Bozo: Takes great satisfaction in knowing or
having something that others don't. Operates from the philosophy
of "Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to
fish and you've lost a customer." Will dispense his pearls of wisdom
only when it serves to demonstrate his superiority.

IV. The Herd Bozo: A dormant characteristic that surfaces when
in the presence of other herd bozos. Typically found at conventions,
public shows and on fan trips. Also known as "Vestie", the herd bozo
indulges in dress and behavior that would embarrass him were he not
in the presence of others of similar persuasion. For better or for
worse, for most of the general public the herd bozo is the public
face of our hobby.

V. The IgnorAnus (not an original term): The über bozo, the
ignoranus is both stupid and an.... well, you can figure it out. In
general terms, the ignoranus is someone who, through ignorance, envy
or malice, seeks to demean, diminish or destroy that which others
value but he neither values nor understands. Think of Turkish
gunners using the sphinx for target practice. Scorns advice, views
it as criticism. Is proud of his ignorance. Downplays the
accomplishments of others and would rather tear others down than
build himself up.

In the entire craftsman vs. RTR discussion we've paid little heed to
the fact that everyone who participates in this hobby deserves to
enjoy it however and at whatever level they wish. And to acknowledge
that as high-end modelers we will find ourselves on the fringe of
the market that results. Even so, our cadre of almost 1300 STMFC
souls encompasses manufacturers, importers, designers, consultants,
dealers, authors, editors and publishers, and we wield an influence
in the hobby way out of proportion to our numbers. We should take
pride in that and not be so concerned with the bozos. When it comes
right down to it, the second, third and fourth categories of bozos
are just annoying. It's only the fifth category, the ignoranus, that
can do damage.

I'm done now.

Tom Madden


Car Classes (Was: Re: Modeler/Craftsman/ Modeler Historian)

destron@...
 

Hope this little hop over the Pond will still be considered on-topic...
(it *is* steam era...)

Car classes existed on the Hungarian State Railways, too, as well as on
all manifestations of railways in Germany. Most other railroads in Europe
had them, too; during the "steam era", each road had its own system
(pre-1968 or so, though steam ran in some places until rather later; in
Europe they more refer to this dividing point in time as
pre-computerization and post-computerization of road numbers). After that
change date, the old numbering systems for freight and passenger equipment
were abolished, and a standardized system still in use today was
introduced, both numeric (for actual road numbers) and alphabetic, for
classifying cars by type. The guy working in the yard is more interested
in the numbers; the engineering or mech division type will understand at
once what is meant by "Eas" (gondola, 4-axle, cleared for 120km/h+), but
will be able to begin little if you tell him the road number. I have a
number of official railway documents of the former Yugoslavian State
Railways, and all of these refer to car types by classes, and list the
road numbers simply in a small table at the end of the entry, almost as an
afterthought.

I would think that such a division of "who needs to know what" would have
applied on our side of the puddle as well, on roads that did use a car
classification system. Certainly I understand the utility of such a
system, especially with roads like the Pennsy, who had the same type of
car scattered all over the map with the road numbers allotted them. For
roads like the Seaboard, they were more systematic, it seems to me, that a
certain series of numbers was identical to a certain car class.

Frank Valoczy

Tony,

I think you already know my "Jackman List" and while it
does include Engineering it does not include Mechanical.

First time I saw any indication that the CB&Q had car
classes was via BRHS publications and I did not take
them seriously. Thought they were just another
manifestation of the same logic that applies names to
paint schemes. GN,NP, and BN did not use car classes at
all and they got by just fine. BNSF does not have any
such system.

Russ

----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, 12 May, 2007 18:26
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Modeler/Craftsman/ Modeler Historian


Russ Strodtz wrote:
> One of my problems with these lists is that while I've spent
my
> entire adult life working for a Railroad the jargon used on
this, (and
> many other), groups just goes right by me. My pet peeve is
referring
> to cars by "classes" instead of number series or car type.

Well, Russ, most people in the Mechanical Department would
say the
opposite; so would many people in the shops, who knew which
spare parts
went with which class. But it's certainly true that train crews
tended
to think of cars (and locomotives) in number series terms, not
by
class, and I can believe switchmen, yard clerks, agents, and
other
people directly connected with operations might have the same
view.
(Now you can give us your "Jackman list" of the jobs you've
held, and
we'll see if my guess is right.) Personally, for those roads
which did
use classes, and letter them on the cars, I find it most
helpful.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705
www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail,
thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history




Yahoo! Groups Links










Yahoo! Groups Links





!DSPAM:1291,46466fd5297288409949172!


Re: Modeler/Craftsman/ Modeler Historian

Russ Strodtz <sheridan@...>
 

Tony,

I think you already know my "Jackman List" and while it
does include Engineering it does not include Mechanical.

First time I saw any indication that the CB&Q had car
classes was via BRHS publications and I did not take
them seriously. Thought they were just another
manifestation of the same logic that applies names to
paint schemes. GN,NP, and BN did not use car classes at
all and they got by just fine. BNSF does not have any
such system.

Russ

----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, 12 May, 2007 18:26
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Modeler/Craftsman/ Modeler Historian


Russ Strodtz wrote:
> One of my problems with these lists is that while I've spent
my
> entire adult life working for a Railroad the jargon used on
this, (and
> many other), groups just goes right by me. My pet peeve is
referring
> to cars by "classes" instead of number series or car type.

Well, Russ, most people in the Mechanical Department would
say the
opposite; so would many people in the shops, who knew which
spare parts
went with which class. But it's certainly true that train crews
tended
to think of cars (and locomotives) in number series terms, not
by
class, and I can believe switchmen, yard clerks, agents, and
other
people directly connected with operations might have the same
view.
(Now you can give us your "Jackman list" of the jobs you've
held, and
we'll see if my guess is right.) Personally, for those roads
which did
use classes, and letter them on the cars, I find it most
helpful.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705
www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail,
thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history




Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Tichy underframe/Kadee 58s

Rob & Bev Manley
 

Dean,
As I prepare my fleet of Steam era cars for each show I examine them for broken detail parts and mechanical failures. When I sopt errant couplers I replace them with #78s if I have the time. If it's possible I'll redo the draft gear mounting or to accept the narrower profile of the 78. The Kato covered hopper is a good example of a car that needs a total replacement as that draft gear only works for thier non-prototypic coupler. I'm not trying to make the perfect freight car every time but I think my cars deserve it.

Rob Manley

----- Original Message -----
From: Dean Payne
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2007 4:52 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Tichy underframe/Kadee 58s


The Tichy underframe that comes with the USRA SS kit has a bit more
play in the coupler box pivot pin than I think it should. I found some
sleeves that came with some other Kadee couplers, but they don't quite
fit over the pin.
One option is to replace the coupler box with the Kadee box, but I
thought the Tichy box looked better. Had I known, I might have gone
with the Kadee 78 box/coupler. Or, does the Kadee work fine without
any modification? I can't be the first to have stumbled into this. I
used the McHenry scale coupler on my PMcK&Y rebuild, and the McHenry
has a different spring setup. I think the Kadee spring would require a
more precise coupler mounting, but I could be wrong.
Doe the Kadees work fine, or do I need to modify/replace the coupler
box?
Dean Payne


Re: Modeler/Craftsman/ Modeler Historian

red_gate_rover
 

OK, I thought I was being very, very civil and just conversing.
Apologies to all if it didn't come across that way. I truly never
expected that sharing of a difference of opinion was generating
anger. --Jim Pasquill


--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Jim, in my -fifty- years of model railroading I have not
met as many of these ultra-critical "bozos" as you have.
Please let us know who they are so we can all avoid them,
or at least we can offer assistance when they attack you
for striving to build your excellent models.


At 5/12/2007 04:23 PM Saturday, you wrote:
--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@> wrote:


Lindsay I think you are having difficulty with the logic here.
The person most likely to "condem" your models is one of the
self annointed craftsman/historian curmudgeons, and not one of
the less strict "bozo" modelers.
Tim, My experience of about 40 years in this hobby is that the
people that know the most, the craftsman/historian types have been
the
most helpful. I'm sorry that your experience seems to been
otherwise. -Jim Pasquill


Re: Modeler/Craftsman/ Modeler Historian

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Russ Strodtz wrote:
One of my problems with these lists is that while I've spent my entire adult life working for a Railroad the jargon used on this, (and many other), groups just goes right by me. My pet peeve is referring to cars by "classes" instead of number series or car type.
Well, Russ, most people in the Mechanical Department would say the opposite; so would many people in the shops, who knew which spare parts went with which class. But it's certainly true that train crews tended to think of cars (and locomotives) in number series terms, not by class, and I can believe switchmen, yard clerks, agents, and other people directly connected with operations might have the same view. (Now you can give us your "Jackman list" of the jobs you've held, and we'll see if my guess is right.) Personally, for those roads which did use classes, and letter them on the cars, I find it most helpful.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Modeler/Craftsman/ Modeler Historian

Richard Hendrickson
 

On May 12, 2007, at 3:52 AM, Russ Strodtz wrote:

....One of my
problems with these lists is that while I've spent
my entire adult life working for a Railroad the jargon
used on this, (and many other), groups just goes right
by me. My pet peeve is referring to cars by "classes"
instead of number series or car type.
Russ, in the steam era a number of railroads assigned class
designations to their freight cars because it was a simpler way to
inventory them than by number series. The Pennsy, especially, needed
to identify cars by classes because of their crazy numbering system(?)
in which cars of the same design were scattered all through their
number series (though, making it easy for all of us, the PRR provided
the class designations in their ORER entries). Among other major
railroads with systematic car classification systems were the Southern
Pacific, Union Pacific, Santa Fe, Baltimore & Ohio, Seaboard, and
Burlington. In almost all cases, the class symbols were stenciled on
the cars and the railroads' live lists, freight car folios, and other
documentation were organized by class, not by car number. In those
cases, it's sort of perverse not to use the class designations when
referring to particular cars or groups of cars owned by those RRs. As
a Santa Fe modeler, a class symbol tells me instantly which Santa Fe
car is under discussion, whereas I'm far from being able to identify
most of them by number series.

Richard Hendrickson

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