Date   

Re: hopper loads

Philip Dove <philip.dove@...>
 

The coke I knew for burning in a domestic stove (hand fired) was about an inch in size and more irregular in shape than a lump of coal because it was porous because all the gas had been baked out (basically coke is coal that has been heated to red heat in an absence of air so it can't burn) Sometimes coke was a by product of making town gas, and tar products, sometimes the coke was what you wanted and the rest was a waste product. Coke is a lot harder to ignite but burns hot and with no smoke. Some coke that I saw was the size of an adults fist. The coke was porous IE honeycombed with very fine pin holes. At a quick glance a heap of coke was black but it was a very dark silvery grey. If I needed to make a model of a coke load I would get some of that very dark grey dense foam used for packing, such as in a Bachmann spectrum box and mince it up small. real coke would just be dust by the time you'd finished trying to crush it to HO scale. Loads of coke straight from the coke oven had to be damped down with water and trucks would be literally steaming. Sometimes you wondered whether the load was smouldering or steaming. In the UK up to the late 1950s one of the main brands of "gasoline" was made with a significant percentage of benzole derived from coal during the coking process. Coke could also be used in filter beds for Sewage farms. Some Kind of bacteria was added to the coke and then dilute sewage was sprayed onto the colonized coke and the fluid that filtered through the beds became treated sewage rather than very noxious raw sewage. Sewage farms would only require loads of coke when they first built the treatment beds, so don't direct carloads of coke to the sewage farm.

----- Original Message -----
From: ed_mines
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: 15 August 2007 17:21
Subject: [STMFC] Re: hopper loads


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Storzek" <destorzek@...> wrote:
> Coke is flat black to dark gray in color.

How about particle size?

Was there much coke being shipped? I recall it was a byproduct of
illuminating gas and some utilities burned coke in special plants.

Ed


Tim Gilbert

John Hitzeman
 

My wife Nancy, and I, met Tim the very first year we attended the Amherst Show in
West Springfield, Mass. (1994 or 5?)
?
As those of you who knew Tim can verify, he was never at a loss for words, most
of which were "nuggets" of knowledge, etc. He could talk for hours, and did.

Somewhere along the line, Tim and Nancy got to talking about where their
families came from. Nancy's mom was raised in Connecticut and it turned
out that Tim and my mother-in-law were distant cousins!!!

So, he was not only part of the train family, but one of the in-laws,
I guess.? <<VBG>>

He had a couple of projects that he wanted me to pursue, so?I guess
I'd better do one before he looses some lightning bolts at me, or something.
;o)

He was a walking encyclopedia of train knowledge, and?he will be sorely missed.

John
Sweating Lake, Missouri





John Hitzeman
President/Owner
American Model Builders, Inc.
LASERkit (tm)
www.rgspemkt.com
www.ambstlouis.net
www.laserkit.com




________________________________________________________________________
AOL now offers free email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at AOL.com.


Re: Freight Car Music

Philip Dove <philip.dove@...>
 

In France and some European countries they counted axles not wheels 231 is the correct notation for a pacific if your French. To digress even further off freight cars Night mail must be the best poem in a train tempo. The poem was written in the thirties as the sound track for a General post office publicity film showing a mail train running through the night London to Glasgow.
What is a boxcar? (Mandatory freight car content.)
Regards Philip Dove

----- Original Message -----
From: Miller, Andrew S.
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: 15 August 2007 13:59
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Freight Car Music


Denny,

Have you ever wondered if 231 was the number of the loco or if Arthur
Honegger merely misunderstood the European wheel designation of the
Pacific?

regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
On Behalf Of Denny Anspach

. . .
Arthur Honegger's
"Pacific 231" probably gets as close as any to true "railroad music"
otherwise.


Re: Coins as car weights

Peter Weiglin
 

Lawrence Rast wrote:

Another option are lead ingots from Bass Pro Shops. Come to about $1.80 per
pound. Easily cut to 1/4, 1/2, 1 oz. sizes and attached with epoxy. Just
be careful when handling. As BPS's site says, "Do not place product in your
mouth."
= = =

And then I asked, "Why not just use the pennies? That designer lead sold in hobby shops is expensive.

So -- Nine pennies is just under one ounce. .984 of an ounce.
Ten pennies is 1.093 ounces.

Apply adhesive, and weights cost nine or ten cents per ounce.

But wait! Subsequent measurements showed that eleven pennies .0970 ounce.
Ten pennies is 1.058 ounces.

How come? Research followed. Turns out there two different weights for pennies, depending on when they were minted. Sometime in 1982, the metallic composition of the penny was changed, and the newer pennies are lighter. Pennies minted before 1982 gave the first set of numbers above, pennies minted after 1982 gave the second set.

No, I didn't have any 1982 pennies to check; I don't know if they changed at the end of a year or during 1982.

So, although it against the law to use pennies for other than their intended purpose, one could glue the requisite number of pennies inside a house car to weight it. Might even tack-solder groups of pennies together.


Peter Weiglin
Amelia, OH


Re: Tim Gilbert

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

I, too, was startled to read about Tim Gilbert's passing. I had noticed that he had not commented in some time and was curious about that.

As many know, Tim, along with Dave Nelson, was a key figure in the accumulation of data about frt car populations and their distribution and he did a great deal of analysis on such. There are quite a few messages in the STMFC archives from Tim containing various aspects of his studies. He and I carried on more than one discussion about such distributions...always pleasurable and interesting. He added the data from my 1949 UP freight conductor's book to his and passed the results to the STMFC.
I was pleased to meet him when he attended Prototype Rails in Cocoa Beach in 2006. He will be missed.

Mike Brock


Re: Question regarding NC&StL / Monon steel gons

Ray Breyer
 

timboconnor@comcast.net wrote:
>>A good picture of one would be helpful :-)

Good point. I just created a new album for the NC&StL 44000-series gons. Once the moderators approve the images, you'll find photos of NC&StL 44275, Monon 6001, and the diagram page for these cars from the NC&StL's 1955 freight car diagram book.

Let me know offlist if you want larger images.

Ray Breyer





---------------------------------
Sick sense of humor? Visit Yahoo! TV's Comedy with an Edge to see what's on, when.


Re: hopper loads

Ray Meyer
 

Bituminous - As I recall that's short for by two minutes it's gone....


--
Atty Raymond G. Meyer
110 E. Main St
Port Washington, WI 53074
262-284-5566
rgmeyer2@gmail.com


Re: Trying to determine ownership of stock cars found in Warsaw, IN

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Aug 15, 2007, at 12:22 PM, Mark Plank wrote:

I am trying to identify the the owning railroad and class of stock
cars appearing in Warsaw, IN in this M. D. McCarter photo at
<http://replica.palni.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/
winona&CISOPTR=371&CISOBOX=1&REC=7>....
Mark, those are New York Central System stock cars as modeled in HO
scale by Al Westerfield.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Freight Car Music

Peter Weiglin
 

...and when/if, I wonder, will our moderator chime in on this topic with the theme song from the old American Airlines "Music 'Til Dawn" program?

You remember the tune? "That's All."

Peter Weiglin
Amelia, OH


Re: Freight Car Music

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "P Grace" <pgrace@...> wrote:

What about the Copenhagen Stram Railway Gallop by Lumbye?
You guys...Hank Snow's "I'm movin on" also covered by the Stones live.
Clark Propst


Re: hopper loads

CJ Riley
 

There was much coke shipped through the 50s in western PA. The Connellsville
are was loaded with beehive oven complexes that shipped by hopper. While some
large steel mills may have had their own in-house coke plants,(J&L Hazlewood
for example) it was my understanding they shipped coke to their mills that
weren't making coke: a very nasty, dirty, and smelly operation not welcomed by
the locals when a new mill was opened. Keep in mind that foundries and similar
industries used coke and wouldnot have in-house capabilities.

CJ Riley
Formerly of Pittsburgh,
now in smoke free Bainbridge Island WA


--- ed_mines <ed_mines@yahoo.com> wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Storzek" <destorzek@...> wrote:
Coke is flat black to dark gray in color.
How about particle size?

Was there much coke being shipped? I recall it was a byproduct of
illuminating gas and some utilities burned coke in special plants.

Ed



____________________________________________________________________________________
Shape Yahoo! in your own image. Join our Network Research Panel today! http://surveylink.yahoo.com/gmrs/yahoo_panel_invite.asp?a=7


Re: Trying to determine ownership of stock cars found in Warsaw, IN

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Andy Miller wrote:
"The cars appear to have 'Howe Truss'."

Look again, Andy - that's true for only the first car in the cut.


Ben Hom


Re: Trying to determine ownership of stock cars found in Warsaw, IN

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Mark Plank asked:
"I am trying to identify the the owning railroad and class of stock
cars appearing in Warsaw, IN in this M. D. McCarter photo at
<http://replica.palni.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?
CISOROOT=/winona&CISOPTR=371&CISOBOX=1&REC=7>, with a plan of
modeling these in S scale. The photo would have been taken between
8/45 and late 1951 (time frame of the Winona Railroad GE 44
tonner). The Winona only had refrigerator cars, so these weren't
their cars. The PRR and Big Four were in the immediate vicinity.
Could these be PRR stock cars?"

No. What we have here is a cut of New York Central stock cars. The
first car behind the locomotive appears to be a Lot 424-S or 425-S
double deck car built in 1921. This is the double deck version of
the Westerfield HO scale NYC stock car kit.
http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-424.jpg
http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/nelx-20047.jpg
http://www.westerfield.biz/10700_1921-3_40__stock_cars__nyc_}
_m_c__ccc_stl_78498.htm

The next three cars appear to be Lot 757-S or 766-S convertable
stock cars rebuilt from USRA SS boxcars in 1947 and 1948. These
cars were the prototype for the HO scale Roco model offered by AHM
in the 1970s and 1980s in virtually every paint scheme except NYC.
Micro-Trains currently offers an N scale of this prototype.
http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/nyc-28000.jpg
http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-757.jpg


Ben Hom


Re: Trying to determine ownership of stock cars found in Warsaw, IN

Miller, Andrew S. <asmiller@...>
 

The cars appear to have Howe Truss sideframes. That would rule out
any PRR class of stock cars from that era.


regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Mark Plank
Sent: Wednesday, August 15, 2007 3:23 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Trying to determine ownership of stock cars found in
Warsaw, IN

I am trying to identify the the owning railroad and class of stock cars
appearing in Warsaw, IN in this M. D. McCarter photo at
<http://replica.palni.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/winona&;CISOPTR
=371&CISOBOX=1&REC=7>, with a plan of modeling these in S scale. The
photo would have been taken between 8/45 and late 1951 (time frame of
the Winona Railroad GE 44 tonner). The Winona only had refrigerator
cars, so these weren't their cars. The PRR and Big Four were in the
immediate vicinity. Could these be PRR stock cars?


Re: Trying to determine ownership of stock cars found in Warsaw, IN

Miller, Andrew S. <asmiller@...>
 

The cars appear to have "Howe Truss"


regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Mark Plank
Sent: Wednesday, August 15, 2007 3:23 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Trying to determine ownership of stock cars found in
Warsaw, IN

I am trying to identify the the owning railroad and class of stock cars
appearing in Warsaw, IN in this M. D. McCarter photo at
<http://replica.palni.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/winona&;CISOPTR
=371&CISOBOX=1&REC=7>, with a plan of modeling these in S scale. The
photo would have been taken between 8/45 and late 1951 (time frame of
the Winona Railroad GE 44 tonner). The Winona only had refrigerator
cars, so these weren't their cars. The PRR and Big Four were in the
immediate vicinity. Could these be PRR stock cars?

The same image with slightly different descriptions and lesser quality
is at
<http://replica.palni.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/winona&;CISOPTR
=426&CISOBOX=1&REC=1>.

If these links do not work, go to <http://replica.palni.edu/index.php>
and in the search box type "Winona cattle cars" without the hyphens and
it should be the second photo displayed.

This particular photo is part of the Archives & Special Collections,
Morgan Library, Grace College & Theological Seminary, Winona Lake,
Indiana. They have over 600+ Winona RR photos that are in the process
of being digitized. This web site is part of the Private Academy
Library Network of Indiana and has railroad photos that you might not
have seen elsewhere.

The majority of the online cars identified so far on the Winona
(northern Indiana) are Wabash (gons and hoppers) and PRR (gons and a
few boxcars), with SP boxcars, Southern gons, and SAL and Ann Arbor
hoppers making fairly frequent appearances - trending away from the
usual rules of equipment seen on a railroad. The Winona's main
industries were eggs (hence the refrigerator cars), bulk oil
distributors, creameries, foundries and a sand/gravel operation. The
Wabash received a fair amount of cars from the sand/gravel operation,
accounting for their large numbers online.

Thanks for any help on the stock cars.
Mark Plank
researching the Toledo & Ohio Central Railroad (NYC Lines)
<http://members.kconline.com/plank/tochome.htm>
researching and modeling in S scale the Winona Railroad
<http://members.kconline.com/plank/winhome.htm>

--
We've Got Your Name at http://www.mail.com !
Get a FREE E-mail Account Today - Choose From 100+ Domains




Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: FEC's "Car Ferry Company" reefers purchased by FGE

gary laakso
 

The 1946 Moody's Steam Railroads has no separate heading for FEC, the reader is referred to ACL. There it is noted: "Jointly with the Florida East Coast Ry. Co., the Atlantic Cast Line R.R. Co. owns control of the Peninsular & Occidental S.S. Co., operating steamship lines between Miami, Port Tampa and Key West Florida to Havana, Cuba." A table on shipments shows none moving by ship prior to 1941-42. In the control table, FEC Car Ferry Company is not listed.

----- Original Message -----
From: lnbill
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: 8/15/2007 3:04:51 PM
Subject: [STMFC] FEC's "Car Ferry Company" reefers purchased by FGE


I spent five days last week in Chapel Hill, NC at the UNC's Wilson
Library where as a part of the ACL's Corporate Archive within the
President's File there were 82 folders devoted to Fruit Growers
Express. I made 1200-1500 digital photos of relevant pages of material
covering approximately 1939 to 1957. This will be of immense value in
helping tell the story of this company. I did find out that among the
cars they acquired were 171 cars from something called Florida East
Coast "Car Ferry Company." The only ORER I have for the period before
1940 is 1931 and there is no entry for this company. Does anyone have a
photo of one of their reefers, or even know anything about Car Ferry
Company?

That same year they also acquired 6 cars from the Borden Company and in
1945 the 10 outside braced reefers built by the N&W in 1918. There is a
photo of one of these in an early CYC.
Again hoping someone can help me with the FEC subsidiary.

Bill Welch


Re: From O'Hare to Naperville's Holiday Inn

Charlie Vlk
 

You COULD take the CTA downtown and then take METRA / BNSF / BN / CB&Q to Naperville....then get a local cab (don't know if the Holiday Inn or whatever it will be by October has a free shuttle) or you could just call American Taxi (www.americantaxi.com 847-255-9600 I am not sure of the rates but if you can get a couple of people together it is reasonable....unless you want the train ride. You do have to make the arrangements prior to leaving the terminal.... call them prior to making your flight and get it clear what phone number you should call after you get your luggage.... DO NOT take a Chicago cab....it will cost you an arm and a leg.... you must prearrange rides to the suburbs. Cost to Naperville should be under $40 with tip and you can share the ride with several people.
Charlie Vlk


Re: hopper loads

Tim O'Connor
 

Hey, don't get greedy! Accurail's already given you two unique-to-GN
freight cars (and acquired a third one from McKean) so give some other
railroads a chance! Seems to me that Accurail SORELY lacks a 3-dome
tank car...

Tim O'Connor

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: "gn3397" <heninger@medicine.nodak.edu>

I happen to know of a certain kit manufacturer who has produced GN
prototype kits in injection molded styrene, who seem to be lacking an
offset twin in their product line. <g>.


Trying to determine ownership of stock cars found in Warsaw, IN

Mark P.
 

I am trying to identify the the owning railroad and class of stock cars appearing in Warsaw, IN in this M. D. McCarter photo at <http://replica.palni.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/winona&;CISOPTR=371&CISOBOX=1&REC=7>, with a plan of modeling these in S scale. The photo would have been taken between 8/45 and late 1951 (time frame of the Winona Railroad GE 44 tonner). The Winona only had refrigerator cars, so these weren't their cars. The PRR and Big Four were in the immediate vicinity. Could these be PRR stock cars?

The same image with slightly different descriptions and lesser quality is at <http://replica.palni.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/winona&;CISOPTR=426&CISOBOX=1&REC=1>.

If these links do not work, go to <http://replica.palni.edu/index.php> and in the search box type "Winona cattle cars" without the hyphens and it should be the second photo displayed.

This particular photo is part of the Archives & Special Collections, Morgan Library, Grace College & Theological Seminary, Winona Lake, Indiana. They have over 600+ Winona RR photos that are in the process of being digitized. This web site is part of the Private Academy Library Network of Indiana and has railroad photos that you might not have seen elsewhere.

The majority of the online cars identified so far on the Winona (northern Indiana) are Wabash (gons and hoppers) and PRR (gons and a few boxcars), with SP boxcars, Southern gons, and SAL and Ann Arbor hoppers making fairly frequent appearances - trending away from the usual rules of equipment seen on a railroad. The Winona's main industries were eggs (hence the refrigerator cars), bulk oil distributors, creameries, foundries and a sand/gravel operation. The Wabash received a fair amount of cars from the sand/gravel operation, accounting for their large numbers online.

Thanks for any help on the stock cars.
Mark Plank
researching the Toledo & Ohio Central Railroad (NYC Lines) <http://members.kconline.com/plank/tochome.htm>
researching and modeling in S scale the Winona Railroad <http://members.kconline.com/plank/winhome.htm>

--
We've Got Your Name at http://www.mail.com !
Get a FREE E-mail Account Today - Choose From 100+ Domains


Re: Freight Car Music

pgrace
 

What about the Copenhagen Stram Railway Gallop by Lumbye?

----- Original Message -----
From: Miller, Andrew S.
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, August 15, 2007 1:59 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Freight Car Music


Denny,

Have you ever wondered if 231 was the number of the loco or if Arthur
Honegger merely misunderstood the European wheel designation of the
Pacific?

regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
On Behalf Of Denny Anspach

. . .
Arthur Honegger's
"Pacific 231" probably gets as close as any to true "railroad music"
otherwise.

116681 - 116700 of 182127