Date   

Re: True Line 40 foot CN boxcar models

cvsne <mjmcguirk@...>
 

Bill,

I've managed to round up a few of these -- the maple leaf cars are
about gone (at least I can't find any more!) but it's fairly
straightforward to add leafs to the cars with the plain CN lettering.

They do add a nice variety of ends to my strings of Red Caboose/IMWX
1937 AAR cars --

One problem -- the initials "C.N." were not, to the best of my
knowledge, stenciled on the doors of the steel cars.

My second problem is the stash of NSC ends I have been rounding up over
the years from Dan Kirlin and Sylvan . . . doesn't look like I have
much use for them!

Marty


True Line 40 foot CN boxcar models

lnbill <bwelch@...>
 

Maybe this has been dicussed before but a message from Canada alerted
me to a group of CN steel boxcar models.

I cannot look at this list aften as before so maybe I am late with this
news. Anyway here is a link with model photos:
http://www.tlacanada.com/TLA/OTS%20-%20P2K,%20etc.htm

Bill Welch


Re: Stick on weights. Was Coins as car weights.

Jim Williams <wwww5960@...>
 

Hi.....The warping is not a result of an action with fumes but from the Goo itself. Goo never completely drys, and the solvent in it will continue to attack the surface for years. This will result in the warping as the the plastic surface constricts. This is much more noticable with the quanity and thickness of the Goo application, ie, "heaped" on a surface as when you are securing weights.....By the way I've personally seen the result on F&C resin kits, after 5 years two gons were so twisted they would stay on the track and the Goo was open to air....Best Jim Williams



---------------------------------
Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.


Re: polymer embrittlement/FOF book?

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Aug 20, 2007, at 7:53 AM, ed_mines wrote:

Feight car contant - when can we start ordering the second "Focus on
Freight Cars" book? From Ted?
Yes, Ed, you can order direct from Speedwitch Media. But give us a
break! I'm just sending Ted the last of the photo captions this
morning, and he still has to do all of the layout and get the book
printed. If all goes well, we hope to have it for sale at Naperville,
but lots of things can go awry between now and then. We're glad you
like the series, but try this mantra: "God grant me patience and I
want it right now!"

Richard Hendrickson


polymer embrittlement/FOF book?

ed_mines
 

Sometimes polymer compositions like plastic become brittle after many
years because they slowly loose plasticizer.

After 20+ years the floor tiles in my parents home started to crack
wherever a chair rest on them.

Feight car contant - when can we start ordering the second "Focus on
Freight Cars" book? From Ted?

Ed


Re: Trainman 70 ton Triple Hoppers

rwitt_2000 <rmwitt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Jim Eager wrote to MFCL 7-June-2005 about this model:
=============================================================
... basically a remake of the MDC 9-panel, which was never
great and definitely long in the tooth, but it looks to be
welded. If so, then C&EI/MP (longer), D&RGW (longer), MKT,
TNM, and TP/MP are it. If riveted then B&O, C&O, C&EI, C&I,
CG, CRR, FEC, GTW, M&StL, RDG, StLBE, and WM, although some
of those had arched or peaked ends.
=============================================================

Tom Haag then wrote:
=============================================================
I then compared it to drawings of a Southern AAR hopper car
that were in the 12/90 issue of MM. The Atlas car was about
a foot and a half longer that the car in the drawing.

Next I reread J. Eager's article on AAR 3-bay, nine-panel
hoppers in the 6/95 issue of RMJ. The article stated that
the Southern cars were a foot longer than the typical AAR
recommended design. Uh oh.

Finally the article said that the M&StL cars were two feet
longer than the typical car. Hmmmm.

So it appears that Atlas used a non-typical prototype to
model the AAR standard 9-panel hopper car.

So fans of the M&StL (and perhaps D&RGW and C&EI) may be
happy but modelers of RDG, CR, WM, CRR, C&O, C&I, CB&Q,
NH and others won't be.
============================================================

No one has said -- is the model riveted or welded? Were the
Southern cars riveted, or welded?

Tim O'Connor

Tim,

I stated that the Atlas Trainman is of riveted construction at least
this is what is visible on the side stakes. David Thompson suggested a
hybrid construction with a welded center sill and riveted side stakes,
etc. and that agrees with the description in the ACF ad.

I have this model and it represents this longer version of the "70-ton
AAR standard side-stake triple hopper". Based on the information in the
1953 C.B. Cyc. apparently both PSC and ACF introduced their larger cars
at about the same time. The ad for Pullman-Standard describes their
PS-3 which also was designed with a larger cubic capacity than the "AAR"
standard hopper described in the Mainline Modeler article.

It is not a B&O prototype so I have not researched this car further.
The B&O continued to order and build the AAR 70-ton standard off-side
side triple and 50-ton twin hoppers until 1959.

Does anyone have information about an alternate AAR standard design for
triple hoppers issued in the early 1950s? Was there a committee report
generated, but not accepted by AAR members? Was the motivation from
outside the AAR; from the railroads and the car builders? In the
1950s, there appeared to be movement towards larger hopper cars as
illustrated by designed generated by the PRR-C&O-N&W consortium and the
two designs offered by ACF and PSC.

Bob Witt




James D Thompson wrote:

The Atlas car is basically a hybrid welded/riveted car that AC&F
built for
C&O in the early and mid-1950s. The Stewart cars were: a late-1950s
NYC
ribside triple adopted as an alternate AAR standard; the
PRR-C&O-N&W
consortium car; and the AAR offset-side triple also recently done
by Accurail.

David,

I respect your knowledge of hopper cars, but are you sure about what
you
stated? I just checked Al Kresse's book on C&O hopper and gondolas
and
cannot find any 70-ton C&O hoppers with the longer inside length as
modeled by the Atlas Trainman series hopper. As I stated in my
earlier
post the Atlas triple hopper appears closest in dimensions to the one
ACF advertised in the 1953 Car Builders' Cyclopedia. The Atlas model
represents a triple hopper that is sightly longer (IL 42'-8") than
the
ones built by ACF (IL 40'-6") or Bethlehem and others (IL 40'-8").
All
have of height of 10'-8" from the top of the rail to the top of the
side.

Bob Witt
Indianapolis, Indiana


Re: Stick on weights. Was Coins as car weights.

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Tony writes-
As I said previously, I'd be happy to show you some Athearn
box car floors which took years to warp with "contact" Goo. "Myth," my
behind.
H-mmm. From glue originally improperly piled on thick like Ambroid and then contact closed improperly before its time? But from "fumes" wafting around for years in a closed car body?? Oh, come on!

I submit that neither you nor anyone is certain what "properly" means.
Well, perhaps a grain of truth if one presumes that no one has a ounce of judgment, nor the will to exercise it. Beyond that this assertion is untenable on its very face, much less in the face of very long term common successful experience to the contrary.

Urban myth it certainly is, and in the cold light of day it will so remain, However, witness the current flare-up, which like a Phoenix arises once more to further falsely discourage a lot of modelers from using a very well proven, VERY handy, and long lasting class of cements.

Sheesh!

What more can I say?

I rest my case.

Denny
--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Okoboji, Iowa


parts delivery

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

Saturday my wife and I made a freight car parts delivery to Denny at
his lakeside home Saturday. Denny had done an excellent job of
assembling several resin kits while he has been there, how he can stay
off the water is beyond me. Denny surprised us with a boat ride in a
fine old wood speed boat. I'm fimilar with Walleye boats, but was
amazed at the acceleration and dry ride of that beautiful old boat.
Thanks Denny, if you need anymore parts let us know.
Clark Propst


Re: Trainman 70 ton Triple Hoppers

Scott Pitzer
 

--- In STMFC@..., SUVCWORR@... wrote:

According to Atlas site the 9 panel 70t AAR open top hopper is a
reccomended
AAR practice from the 1930's which "fell out of favor by the 1950's"

Rich Orr
Seems like Atlas may have taken that description from a much different
prototype, the offset triple (as modeled by Stewart and then
Accurail.) Who had anything even similar to this Atlas model in the
1930s?
Scott Pitzer


Re: Lead

Allen Cain <allencain@...>
 

Bruce Griffin correctly pointed out to me that I used INGESTION where I
should have used INHALATION where lead fumes are inhaled in my previous post
on lead. Sorry for the mistake but I think that most folks get the point.
Both INGESTION and INHALATION are paths that can allow LEAD to enter your
body and eventually get into your blood stream. I guess that I should have
also used the risk of ABSORPTION of lead when you have an open cut or if you
rub your eyes with hands after handling lead.



As was also pointed out, INHALATION while soldering with materials
containing lead can increase your exposure.



I guess the point that I was trying to make was that I think that lead can
be used safely to add weight and to solder IF a person understands the
proper precautions and follows them.



Thanks Bruce for the correction.



Allen Cain


Re: CV flat car lengths

Roger Hinman <rhinman@...>
 

I can't speak about the CV cars but lengths are often an issue of
confusion. I've come across at least four different lengths in rr
documentation:

IL: the useable length on a car, or interior length
EL: the outside length, presumed to be corner to corner
OES; the length over end sills
OCL: the length over coupling faces

Lengths listed in Equipment Registers are not consistent either and
depend on the owner

My guess is the two measurments you gave could both be correct


Roger Hinman

On Aug 19, 2007, at 11:03 PM, Martin McGuirk wrote:

I've managed to run into a confusing situation with regards to the
length of two classes of Central Vermont flat cars. This project
started simple enough - I was going to use a Tichy flat -- then
noticed the cars are stenciled "Lngth 36'-10" -- obviously shorter
than the Tichy flats.

So I decided this may make a worthwhile scratchbuilding project. So I
dug out more photos and my official railroad freight car data sheets.
All the cars in the photos have a length of 36'-10". Adding to the
confusion official paperwork lists the overall length of 37'-5" --

Is one correct and one in error? Or is it possible one is measuring
the length over the strikers and the other is showing the length over
the end beams?

Obviously, I'm trying to figure out where to measure the overall
length from to build the model to the correct length.

Anyone run into a similar situation?

Marty


Re: Trainman 70 ton Triple Hoppers

Tim O'Connor
 

Jim Eager wrote to MFCL 7-June-2005 about this model:
=============================================================
... basically a remake of the MDC 9-panel, which was never
great and definitely long in the tooth, but it looks to be
welded. If so, then C&EI/MP (longer), D&RGW (longer), MKT,
TNM, and TP/MP are it. If riveted then B&O, C&O, C&EI, C&I,
CG, CRR, FEC, GTW, M&StL, RDG, StLBE, and WM, although some
of those had arched or peaked ends.
=============================================================

Tom Haag then wrote:
=============================================================
I then compared it to drawings of a Southern AAR hopper car
that were in the 12/90 issue of MM. The Atlas car was about
a foot and a half longer that the car in the drawing.

Next I reread J. Eager's article on AAR 3-bay, nine-panel
hoppers in the 6/95 issue of RMJ. The article stated that
the Southern cars were a foot longer than the typical AAR
recommended design. Uh oh.

Finally the article said that the M&StL cars were two feet
longer than the typical car. Hmmmm.

So it appears that Atlas used a non-typical prototype to
model the AAR standard 9-panel hopper car.

So fans of the M&StL (and perhaps D&RGW and C&EI) may be
happy but modelers of RDG, CR, WM, CRR, C&O, C&I, CB&Q,
NH and others won't be.
============================================================

No one has said -- is the model riveted or welded? Were the
Southern cars riveted, or welded?

Tim O'Connor

James D Thompson wrote:

The Atlas car is basically a hybrid welded/riveted car that AC&F built for
C&O in the early and mid-1950s. The Stewart cars were: a late-1950s NYC
ribside triple adopted as an alternate AAR standard; the PRR-C&O-N&W
consortium car; and the AAR offset-side triple also recently done by Accurail.
David,

I respect your knowledge of hopper cars, but are you sure about what you
stated? I just checked Al Kresse's book on C&O hopper and gondolas and
cannot find any 70-ton C&O hoppers with the longer inside length as
modeled by the Atlas Trainman series hopper. As I stated in my earlier
post the Atlas triple hopper appears closest in dimensions to the one
ACF advertised in the 1953 Car Builders' Cyclopedia. The Atlas model
represents a triple hopper that is sightly longer (IL 42'-8") than the
ones built by ACF (IL 40'-6") or Bethlehem and others (IL 40'-8"). All
have of height of 10'-8" from the top of the rail to the top of the
side.

Bob Witt
Indianapolis, Indiana


Re: CV flat car lengths

Richard Dermody <ddermody@...>
 

Marty,

Which number series are you referring to?

Dick

On Aug 19, 2007, at 11:03 PM, Martin McGuirk wrote:

I've managed to run into a confusing situation with regards to the
length of two classes of Central Vermont flat cars. This project
started simple enough - I was going to use a Tichy flat -- then
noticed the cars are stenciled "Lngth 36'-10" -- obviously shorter
than the Tichy flats.

So I decided this may make a worthwhile scratchbuilding project. So I
dug out more photos and my official railroad freight car data sheets.
All the cars in the photos have a length of 36'-10". Adding to the
confusion official paperwork lists the overall length of 37'-5" --

Is one correct and one in error? Or is it possible one is measuring
the length over the strikers and the other is showing the length over
the end beams?

Obviously, I'm trying to figure out where to measure the overall
length from to build the model to the correct length.


Anyone run into a similar situation?

Marty



Yahoo! Groups Links




CV flat car lengths

Martin McGuirk <mjmcguirk@...>
 

I've managed to run into a confusing situation with regards to the length of two classes of Central Vermont flat cars. This project started simple enough - I was going to use a Tichy flat -- then noticed the cars are stenciled "Lngth 36'-10" -- obviously shorter than the Tichy flats.

So I decided this may make a worthwhile scratchbuilding project. So I dug out more photos and my official railroad freight car data sheets. All the cars in the photos have a length of 36'-10". Adding to the confusion official paperwork lists the overall length of 37'-5" --

Is one correct and one in error? Or is it possible one is measuring the length over the strikers and the other is showing the length over the end beams?

Obviously, I'm trying to figure out where to measure the overall length from to build the model to the correct length.


Anyone run into a similar situation?

Marty


Re: CNJ war emergency 52'-6" gondolas (slight correction - see date built)

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

A. T.: There are photos in the 8/2001 Railroad Model Craftsman (CNJ 86287, 1860 cu ft stenciled; and CNJ 86212) and RMC 4/1995 (CRP 86839). They look pretty conventional.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: proto48er
To: STMFC@...

Thanks for the information. Have you ever seen a photo of one of
these cars as a composite car?

--- In STMFC@..., Ted Culotta <tculotta@...> wrote:

The CNJ Emergency gons were both of composite design, built by
Bethlehem Steel under Orders DF-42 (86000-86499) and DF-43
(86500-86999), completed in February and April of 1943,
respectively.


Re: Trainman 70 ton Triple Hoppers

rwitt_2000 <rmwitt@...>
 

James D Thompson wrote:
The Atlas car is basically a hybrid welded/riveted car that AC&F built
for
C&O in the early and mid-1950s. The Stewart cars were: a late-1950s
NYC
ribside triple adopted as an alternate AAR standard; the PRR-C&O-N&W
consortium car; and the AAR offset-side triple also recently done by
Accurail.

David,

I respect your knowledge of hopper cars, but are you sure about what you
stated? I just checked Al Kresse's book on C&O hopper and gondolas and
cannot find any 70-ton C&O hoppers with the longer inside length as
modeled by the Atlas Trainman series hopper. As I stated in my earlier
post the Atlas triple hopper appears closest in dimensions to the one
ACF advertised in the 1953 Car Builders' Cyclopedia. The Atlas model
represents a triple hopper that is sightly longer (IL 42'-8") than the
ones built by ACF (IL 40'-6") or Bethlehem and others (IL 40'-8"). All
have of height of 10'-8" from the top of the rail to the top of the
side.

Bob Witt
Indianapolis, Indiana


Re: Trainman 70 ton Triple Hoppers

Greg Martin
 

Vince,

I am not sure but I believe your original post was regarding this Atlas
Trainman hopper and correct me if I am wrong...

_http://www.atlastrainman.com/HOFreight/tmho70tonhopper.htm_
(http://www.atlastrainman.com/HOFreight/tmho70tonhopper.htm)

And if we are talking about the same car I know a couple of New Haven
lurkers here in the PNW that claim that this car is a very good fit for a New Haven
Hopper that I had taken photos of in Mingo Junction, Ohio in the early
1970's ( one of the two NH guys here was with me at the time) and albeit I don't
have one of the kits to measure it does look like a very good match got NH's PS
hopper and if I a not mistaken I believe they were purchased about 1953. The
NH numbers were 80000 to 80549 built by Pullman Standard and they did have
rivets on the exterior post.

What is not clear is how these cars differ from other cars on the market and
until one or both of these guys receive their cars. If it is correct and it
sure looks correct to me it will be a big plus for the NH guys, and other NH
steam era freight car.

Greg Martin






************************************** Get a sneak peek of the all-new AOL at
http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour


Re: CNJ war emergency 52'-6" gondolas (slight correction - see date built)

proto48er
 

Ted -

Thanks for the information. Have you ever seen a photo of one of
these cars as a composite car? Their very early built date might
indicate that the middle group of diagonal side braces were different
from all other cars of this type, and redesigned for later cars. I
am sure that the pressed braces were all made by the same company
during the war and distributed to the various car builders awarded
construction contracts.

A.T. Kott

--- In STMFC@..., Ted Culotta <tculotta@...> wrote:

The CNJ Emergency gons were both of composite design, built by
Bethlehem Steel under Orders DF-42 (86000-86499) and DF-43
(86500-86999), completed in February and April of 1943,
respectively.

Regards,
Ted Culotta


Speedwitch Media
645 Tanner Marsh Road, Guilford, CT 06437
info@...
www.speedwitch.com
(203) 747-0190




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Trainman 70 ton Triple Hoppers

 

--- rwitt_2000 <rmwitt@...> wrote:

Vince Altiere wrote:

Can anyone tell me for which railroads (esp. the
B&O ??) the Trainman
70 ton,9panel hopper is accurate for,or at least
as a stand-in??
Vince,

I purchased one last month. I am modeling one in
Southern series 70300-73749 / 281000-281299. The model
is almost a spitting image of the AAR design of the
'50s. The article, drawings and photos, which I am
using are in the December 1990 Mainline Modeler.

Rich Christie
Future "J" fan and modeler



____________________________________________________________________________________
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Re: 2D-F8 trucks

Bob Karig <karig@...>
 

Kiesel's patent was filed in 1922 and it was awarded in January 1924.

At 12:48 PM 8/19/2007, you wrote:
Does anyone know when Pennsy first used their 2D-F8 freight car trucks?

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV




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