Date   

Re: Turning Boxcars Into Tank Cars

Tim O'Connor
 

Guy Wilber re-posted

From The Archives:
A small number of railroads converted box cars into "tank" cars
by adding storage tanks into the body of the car during WW2. The
AAR's Tank Car Committee was charged with overseeing the performance
of these conversions. All, save one, were authorized to haul only
fuel oils .... [SNIP]
In addition to the 2003 message that Guy re-posted, I have old emails
on this subject from the Freightcars List from 2000.

Your humble servant, Tim O'Connor
============================================================================

Al Westerfield wrote:

Gene Green just sent me an article from the July 1944 issue of Railway
Mechanical Engineer concerning fuel oil trains during WW2.
[snip]

Eight box cars were also converted to carry tanks for this purpose: PRR
69741, ATSF 118032, SERX 13052, 13096, 13208, 13224, B&O 390000 and 390050.
I have partial photos of both ATSF 118032 and one of the B&O cars. The
tanks were some sort of rubberized fabric supported in wood frames. I can
only speculate about how these tanks were loaded and unloaded, as they
almost completely filled the space inside the car. It's possible that they
were open at the top - the photos don't make this clear - which would have
simplified the loading and unloading but would have invited problems from
sloshing and spilling if subjected to rough train handling that are
sobering to contemplate.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520
============================================================================

The two B&O boxcars in oil service were converted at Mt. Clare from the B&O's
class M-27 and M-27A boxcars. These were B&O's 1 1/2 door and double door,
increased height versions of the 1923 ARA steel boxcar design. The original
cars were designed for auto service, but of course by WW2 they had been
largely superceded in this service by other extended height designs.

The two B&O boxcars converted to oil service (B&O 390000 M-27G, and B&O
390050, M-27H) were not the same.

B&O 390000 (Class M-27G) was converted from B&O 290301 (Class M-27A) by
installation of 4 "B&O design oil containers". We have 3 photos, 2 appear to
be B&O company photos and the third is an ODT photo. They show wooden boxes
much like what Richard H. described but the ODT photo says that it has "steel
tanks enclosed in wooden boxes". The four tanks had a total capacity of
12,200 gallons. The photos show the door open with a horizontal filler pipe
facing out of the car near the center. The pipe connects to valve and then
maybe to some kind of manifold connected to the other tanks. There is a
ladder attached to the tank by the filler pipe. There are bottom unloading
outlets on the side of the car. The tanks are numbered 1 - 4 (starting at
the B end) and tanks 1 & 2 unload on the car's right side and 3 & 4 on the
left. The car has stencils indicating it is for oil with a flash point not
less than 150° F. The car has 2 louvered vents on each side and some curious
looking little capped pipes or stacks extending up from the roof. Some of
these may have been intended to provide additional ventilation for the
interior space of the car; however, at least one appears to be attached
directly to one of the tanks. The latter would be needed to vent the
atmosphere displaced during loading and to provide vacuum relief when
unloaded. The class diagram says that the tank was 6' 9 5/8" tall and that
the door opening was 8' 5 13/16" tall, so as Richard said, it was a tight fit
to get inside. However, the filler pipe was necked over to the door opening
and would have been easy to access from the side of the car. The ODT photo
shows a man on a ladder with a hose attached to the filler pipe. The
reweigh date is 2-43 and the B&O Class diagram says that the tanks were
removed 11-1-45 and the car reconverted to an M-27A.

B&O 390050 (Class M-27H) was converted from B&O 290987 (Class M-27) by
installation of 5 Youngstown corrugated oil tanks. The only photo of this
car that I have seen is the one in that several others have referred to in
Wayner's book (pg. 34) which is credited "Youngstown Steel Door Co." The
car's stencil says that the five tanks had a total capacity of 12,727
gallons. The car door is open and has filler pipes extending up through the
roof of the car. There are no bottom unloading outlets but in addition to
the filler pipe, there is a hatch atop each of the visible tanks. The car is
stencilled that it is for oil with a flash point not less than 110° F
indicating that it was intended for more volatile oils than the previous car.
The car has 4 louvered vents on each side. The class diagram says that the
tank was 5' 3" tall and with the same height door as 390000. The reweigh
date is 3-43 and the B&O Class diagram says that the tanks were removed
3-6-45 and the car reconverted to an M-27.

Both cars are stenciled on the door (and on the end of 390000), "Do not enter
car with exposed flame or lighted lantern." Sound advice indeed!

If anyone has additional photos of these cars, particularly 290050, I would
very much appreciate getting copies or learning the source.

Chris Barkan
============================================================================


Re: Turning Boxcars Into Tank Cars

boyds1949 <E27ca@...>
 

Guy,

Thanks.

I will only add that both B&O cars were in the B&O Summary of
Equipment books dated 1-1-44 and 1-1-45. Neither were in the
Summary of Equipment dated January 1, 1946.

John King

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, guycwilber@... wrote:


In a message dated 9/18/2007 5:28:55 PM Central Daylight Time,
thecitrusbelt@... writes:

Does anyone know more about these cars and how successful they
were?



From The Archives:


A small number of railroads converted box cars into "tank" cars by
adding
storage tanks into the body of the car during WW2. The AAR's Tank
Car
Committee
was charged with overseeing the performance of these conversions.
All, save
one, were authorized to haul only fuel oils and all were used only
in company
service.

The Pennsylvania converted x31 69741 with the use of six
compartments (cells)
fabricated of material composed of two layers of balloon cloth
between layers
of type FA Thiocol. The car was used to haul No. 3 fuel oil between
Floreffe, Pennsylvania and the Pennsy engine house at Harrisburg
(268
miles).
The car
made a total of 17 trips between October 30, 1942 and December 26,
1943. The
car, plagued with leakage problems, was dismantled and returned to
regular
service in March of 1944.

The Santa Fe divided the body of box car 118032 into four
compartments
constructed by the Flexitank Corporation. The car was assigned to
between
Lockport,
Illinois and the Round House in Chicago (33 miles). The car was
used to
transport Diesel fuel oil. Between June 10. 1943 and March 31,
1944 the car
made
a total of 60 trips and was withdrawn from service in April, 1944.
The report
notes that the car experienced slight leaks on all but two trips.

SERX, formerly DT&I auto cars; 13052, 13096, 13208 and 13224 were
equipped
with four Flexitanks (similar to the Santa Fe car). The four cars
were loaded
with fuel oil at Port Author, Texas on June 10, 1943 with 9,400 of
fuel oil.
The cars were moved to Gulfport, NY on June 20, 1943. The cars
made only one
additional trip and were returned to Flexitank during October,
1943 for
restoration to original configuration.

B&O box car 390000, the car featured in the LOC collection, was
equipped by
the railroad with four steel lined wooden tanks with suitable
piping and
venting for overhead loading and bottom unloading. The car was
used between
Baltimore and Washington hauling Diesel oil. Between February 23,
1943 and
January
30, 1944 the car made 43 trips transporting a total of 510,284
gallons of
fuel
-- loads ranged from 9,777 and 12, 238 gallons. The tanks were
damaged during
trip two and were replaced. As of June, 1945 the car was still in
service.

B&O box car 390050 was converted by the railroad on utilizing
(five)
corrugated steel tanks constructed by Youngstown Steel Door
Company. The
experimental
car was designed to handle higher flash point petroleum products --
the tanks
were designed to have a 2% expansion dome. The car was subjected
to numerous
impact tests under order of the AAR's Tank Car Committee. The
tests were
conducted By Youngstown on April 20, 1943. The car was placed in
service on
May
6, 1943. Reports furnished covered a total of 36 loaded trips, a
total of
457,503 gallons of petroleum products having a flash point above
110 degrees
(Fahrenheit). The car was declared a success and recommended as a
suitable
substitute should more "emergency" cars be required. The car was
still in
service
as of June, 1945.

In addition to the box car conversions there were several
experiments
performed on air activated cement containers converted to handle
fuel oils.
Such
containers exhibited few problems and 100 (five per car) sets were
approved
and
still in service as of June, 1945. No specific railroads are
listed as
operating the design within the AAR reports.

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Sparks, Nevada




************************************** See what's new at
http://www.aol.com


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: CB&Q to IHB Friday 10-Jul-59

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Another reason for accepting equipment at specified locations is/was the applicability of taxes.

SGL



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Russ Strodtz
Sent: Monday, September 17, 2007 9:57 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: CB&Q to IHB Friday 10-Jul-59



Tim,

The CB&Q accepted all it's passenger equipment at
Lincoln NE. One reason is that was where they had
the Road's standard scale located. This included
the bi-level suburban equipment.

This move was made in freight service.

On the other hand I can recall getting new SP
baggage/mail cars and those they wanted at the
Coach Yard for loading and use in normal service.
Probably saved them a lot in shipping charges.

Russ

----- Original Message -----
From: Tim O'Connor
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, 17 September, 2007 19:56
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: CB&Q to IHB Friday 10-Jul-59

I have a photo of a streamlined coach in an SP freight
in Texas... coupled between two box cars. I wonder how
common that was?

Tim O'Connor


Decals for Sunshine kit #9.7 USRA Rebuild

emhelbig <emhelbig@...>
 

I recently sold this kit via Ebay only to find out that the decals that
were supposed to come with the kit were not in the box, but had been
sustituted for another set. My question: is there anyone who knows
where I may be able to find a set of these, a comparable replacement,
or whom I might contact to locate the decals. According to my info, the
decals were made in conjunction with the ATSF Modelers Society?
According to the box; Scout, Straight Map and Buy War Bonds decals.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you
Gary Auger


Re: HO FGE Wood bodied Reefer Kits & Universal brakes

Russ Strodtz <railfreightcars@...>
 

Andy,

Just by coincidence found a FGEX 11343 in service
on 23-Aug-59. Had to look that one up to make sure
that was a good number. Can't say I've found a photo
of that series yet but still looking. I sure can't
remember ever seeing one in person.

Russ

----- Original Message -----
From: Andy Carlson
To: Steam Era
Sent: Tuesday, 18 September, 2007 18:49
Subject: [STMFC] HO FGE Wood bodied Reefer Kits & Universal brakes


Intermountain HO FGE Undec Kits are here.
Intermountain Assembled FGE
Intermountain Assembled FGE Ventilator service
Intermountain Assembled Western Fruit Express (GN)
Intermountain Assembled WFE large goat (later scheme)

Intermountain Santa Fe Stock Car AB Kits
Intermountain Santa FE Stock Car K brake kits
Intermountain Santa FE Texas Chief (S&T) Assembled Reefer

RED CABOOSE
Red Caboose X29 dread. ends '28 undec kit
Red Caboose X29 steel ends '24 undec
Red Caboose X29 plate end "patch" undec kit
Red Caboose X29 ARA Plate w/ B&O details kit
Red Caboose '37 AAR W-corner SD kit
Red Caboose '37 AAR Sq-corner SD kit

Also, I have a huge supply of Universal brake sets from IM's ART reefer


Priced right, as always, and available now at <midcentury@sbcglobal.net>
Contact me off-list if interested. Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Harriman Stock cars (was CB&Q to IHB Friday 10-Jul-59)

Russ Strodtz <railfreightcars@...>
 

Garth,

So the Westerfield 5352 would fill the bill as a UP
36' stock car used in the late 50's just fine. It will
come with the proper lettering.

Don't really need to get involved with the Red Caboose
car. FWIW the SP cars shown on their web site were in
service to the East Coast in 1959. That's what got me
interested in a UP variation as I found them also.

Thanks much!

Russ

----- Original Message -----
From: Garth G. Groff
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, 18 September, 2007 08:28
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Harriman Stock cars (was CB&Q to IHB Friday 10-Jul-59)


Russ,

You can view the Westerfield Harriman stock cars at their web site:
http://www.westerfield.biz/ . Scroll down the table of contents to
series 5200, 5300 and 5400. The Red Caboose model is essentially the
same as Westerfield's 5300.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff


Re: Turning Boxcars Into Tank Cars

Bruce Smith
 

Bob,

This photo is one of a series of this B&O car. It is not clear how many
other cars were converted (if any). This was a time of serious crisis, as
U-boats were decimating the tankers that carried oil from the US Gulf
coast to the northeast. The winter of 1942-43 saw street protests by
housewives in the NE due to the scarcity of home heating fuel. As has
been pointed out, anything that could be was converted to fuel service
include gons with containers. However, the completion of the "Big Inch"
and portions of the "Little Inch" pipeline in mid 1943 combined with the
mobilization of practically every tank car in the country (with the
exception of those serving vital needs such as water for AT&SF steamers),
the need for these radical "tank cars" was reduced, while the need for
these cars to haul their intended cargos was increased as war production
ramped up. Thus, they were a short lived expedient.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

On Tue, September 18, 2007 5:26 pm, Bob Chaparro wrote:
Here are a couple of images from the Library of Congress collection.
They show an automobile box car which has been converted to a
(temporary?) tank car. The images appear to have been taken during
World War II so the need for oil transportation and lack of need for
automobile transportation during that period make sense.

Does anyone know more about these cars and how successful they were?

Here are captions and links to the images:

"Government and railroad officials inspect the new model boxcar
petroleum carrier designed to help the oil shortage in the East. It
is estimated by officials of the Office of Defense Transportation
that one thousand such cars could add more than 15,000 barrels to the
daily receipts of petroleum by rail in the East."

http://tinyurl.com/39nahx

"New type of boxcar petroleum carrier which the Office of Defense
Transportation hopes may soon be helping to solve the oil shortage in
the East. The car is a standard automobile-type steel box car fitted
with four steel tanks enclosed in wooden boxes. It has a capacity of
12,200 gallons--considerably more than the average tank car serving
the�"

http://tinyurl.com/34rrmb

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA





Yahoo! Groups Links




HO FGE Wood bodied Reefer Kits & Universal brakes

Andy Carlson
 

Intermountain HO FGE Undec Kits are here.
Intermountain Assembled FGE
Intermountain Assembled FGE Ventilator service
Intermountain Assembled Western Fruit Express (GN)
Intermountain Assembled WFE large goat (later scheme)

Intermountain Santa Fe Stock Car AB Kits
Intermountain Santa FE Stock Car K brake kits
Intermountain Santa FE Texas Chief (S&T) Assembled Reefer

RED CABOOSE
Red Caboose X29 dread. ends '28 undec kit
Red Caboose X29 steel ends '24 undec
Red Caboose X29 plate end "patch" undec kit
Red Caboose X29 ARA Plate w/ B&O details kit
Red Caboose '37 AAR W-corner SD kit
Red Caboose '37 AAR Sq-corner SD kit

Also, I have a huge supply of Universal brake sets from IM's ART reefer


Priced right, as always, and available now at <midcentury@sbcglobal.net>
Contact me off-list if interested. Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Weathering laser cut flat car deck

Charles Hladik
 

Jim,
I've had good luck with weathering such decks by wire brushing, chcnking
with a hobby knife blade and weathering with alcohol and india ink. Be sure
to "open" the ends between the planks.
Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division



************************************** See what's new at http://www.aol.com


Re: Turning Boxcars Into Tank Cars

proto48er
 

Bob -

During WWII, this practice was a relatively uncommon expedient. An
article in Railway Age of April 17, 1943, page 794, indicated that
100 gondolas fitted with LCL Corp. air activated cement containers
had been refitted with rubber seals and converted temporarily for
petroleum transport for the war effort. When a gon had five air
activated containers in it, it would hold 8,750 gal. of petroleum.
With six containers, one gon would hold 10,170 gal. of oil. DL&W
#68083 with 5 containers was illustrated as an example. The
containers were two different sizes, larger ones being in the cars
with spaces for 5, and smaller ones being in cars with spaces for 6.

A.T. Kott

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Chaparro" <thecitrusbelt@...>
wrote:

Here are a couple of images from the Library of Congress
collection.
They show an automobile box car which has been converted to a
(temporary?) tank car. The images appear to have been taken during
World War II so the need for oil transportation and lack of need
for
automobile transportation during that period make sense.

Does anyone know more about these cars and how successful they were?

Here are captions and links to the images:

"Government and railroad officials inspect the new model boxcar
petroleum carrier designed to help the oil shortage in the East. It
is estimated by officials of the Office of Defense Transportation
that one thousand such cars could add more than 15,000 barrels to
the
daily receipts of petroleum by rail in the East."

http://tinyurl.com/39nahx

"New type of boxcar petroleum carrier which the Office of Defense
Transportation hopes may soon be helping to solve the oil shortage
in
the East. The car is a standard automobile-type steel box car
fitted
with four steel tanks enclosed in wooden boxes. It has a capacity
of
12,200 gallons--considerably more than the average tank car serving
the…"

http://tinyurl.com/34rrmb

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Reverse Creco Door questions

armprem
 

Correct me if I am wrong (And I am sure you will),but didn't Des Plaines Hobbies release a RC CGW X29 type box car with a different door?Bethlehem Car Works in conjunction with Rutland Car Shops released a RC B&M box car with a Creco door.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@worldnet.att.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 1:14 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Reverse Creco Door questions


Jim Mischke wrote:
"So it is a Pullman design, not a Creco.
Did anyone else besides CGW avail themselves of this door?"

Clark Propst replied:
"I'm pulling this out of my rear, but I think Red Caboose did one
other road, very small road..."

That's probably the High Point, Thomasville & Denton cars, which
were a tall version of the 1923 ARA boxcar (NOT the later 1932 ARA
cars).
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/gallery/boxauto/hptd424main.html

The doors on these cars were NOT identical to neither the CGW
Pullman carbuiders' doors nor those used on the B&M/MTC 1923 ARA
boxcars.


"...and there was another 1932 car with those doors...Mexican?"

NdeM. See Ed Hawkins' 1932 ARA boxcar summary and Ted Culotta's
book for more information:
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/prototype/frtcars/1932arapdfmain.html


I'm in complete agreement with Ted regarding these doors - the
misunderstanding regarding these doors is is another piece of
modeler's folklore that needs to be ruthlessly stamped out.


Ben Hom






Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: Turning Boxcars Into Tank Cars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:
Does anyone know more about these cars and how successful they were?
Unfortunately, Richard Hendrickson is out of the country right now--he knows quite a bit about these cars. Bob, I am sure Richard would be glad to share what he knows when he's back in early October.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Turning Boxcars Into Tank Cars

Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

Here are a couple of images from the Library of Congress collection.
They show an automobile box car which has been converted to a
(temporary?) tank car. The images appear to have been taken during
World War II so the need for oil transportation and lack of need for
automobile transportation during that period make sense.

Does anyone know more about these cars and how successful they were?

Here are captions and links to the images:

"Government and railroad officials inspect the new model boxcar
petroleum carrier designed to help the oil shortage in the East. It
is estimated by officials of the Office of Defense Transportation
that one thousand such cars could add more than 15,000 barrels to the
daily receipts of petroleum by rail in the East."

http://tinyurl.com/39nahx

"New type of boxcar petroleum carrier which the Office of Defense
Transportation hopes may soon be helping to solve the oil shortage in
the East. The car is a standard automobile-type steel box car fitted
with four steel tanks enclosed in wooden boxes. It has a capacity of
12,200 gallons--considerably more than the average tank car serving
the…"

http://tinyurl.com/34rrmb

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Turning Boxcars Into Tank Cars

Guy Wilber
 

In a message dated 9/18/2007 5:28:55 PM Central Daylight Time,
thecitrusbelt@yahoo.com writes:

Does anyone know more about these cars and how successful they were?



From The Archives:


A small number of railroads converted box cars into "tank" cars by adding
storage tanks into the body of the car during WW2. The AAR's Tank Car
Committee
was charged with overseeing the performance of these conversions. All, save
one, were authorized to haul only fuel oils and all were used only in company
service.

The Pennsylvania converted x31 69741 with the use of six compartments (cells)
fabricated of material composed of two layers of balloon cloth between layers
of type FA Thiocol. The car was used to haul No. 3 fuel oil between
Floreffe, Pennsylvania and the Pennsy engine house at Harrisburg (268
miles).
The car
made a total of 17 trips between October 30, 1942 and December 26, 1943. The
car, plagued with leakage problems, was dismantled and returned to regular
service in March of 1944.

The Santa Fe divided the body of box car 118032 into four compartments
constructed by the Flexitank Corporation. The car was assigned to between
Lockport,
Illinois and the Round House in Chicago (33 miles). The car was used to
transport Diesel fuel oil. Between June 10. 1943 and March 31, 1944 the car
made
a total of 60 trips and was withdrawn from service in April, 1944. The report
notes that the car experienced slight leaks on all but two trips.

SERX, formerly DT&I auto cars; 13052, 13096, 13208 and 13224 were equipped
with four Flexitanks (similar to the Santa Fe car). The four cars were loaded
with fuel oil at Port Author, Texas on June 10, 1943 with 9,400 of fuel oil.
The cars were moved to Gulfport, NY on June 20, 1943. The cars made only one
additional trip and were returned to Flexitank during October, 1943 for
restoration to original configuration.

B&O box car 390000, the car featured in the LOC collection, was equipped by
the railroad with four steel lined wooden tanks with suitable piping and
venting for overhead loading and bottom unloading. The car was used between
Baltimore and Washington hauling Diesel oil. Between February 23, 1943 and
January
30, 1944 the car made 43 trips transporting a total of 510,284 gallons of
fuel
-- loads ranged from 9,777 and 12, 238 gallons. The tanks were damaged during
trip two and were replaced. As of June, 1945 the car was still in service.

B&O box car 390050 was converted by the railroad on utilizing (five)
corrugated steel tanks constructed by Youngstown Steel Door Company. The
experimental
car was designed to handle higher flash point petroleum products -- the tanks
were designed to have a 2% expansion dome. The car was subjected to numerous
impact tests under order of the AAR's Tank Car Committee. The tests were
conducted By Youngstown on April 20, 1943. The car was placed in service on
May
6, 1943. Reports furnished covered a total of 36 loaded trips, a total of
457,503 gallons of petroleum products having a flash point above 110 degrees
(Fahrenheit). The car was declared a success and recommended as a suitable
substitute should more "emergency" cars be required. The car was still in
service
as of June, 1945.

In addition to the box car conversions there were several experiments
performed on air activated cement containers converted to handle fuel oils.
Such
containers exhibited few problems and 100 (five per car) sets were approved
and
still in service as of June, 1945. No specific railroads are listed as
operating the design within the AAR reports.

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Sparks, Nevada




************************************** See what's new at http://www.aol.com


Re: Reverse Creco Door questions

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

Thanks Tom and Ben. I should buy a spare set of doors and repaint a
Pennsy X29 I have for just that purpose, Last time I tried they were
out of stock. Then RC came out with the patch panel carbody in the
simple CGW scheme so I put the project on hold. When I used to custom
paint I made a point of buying either UP or BN engines to repaint just
to get them off the market : )

I remember when RC first announced they were going to do the X29 and in
CGW lettering (I and others) called to see if they were going to do the
correctish CGW (Pullman) door. It came down to us supplying
photos/drawings. We did and they did. And as Ted would say, it's the
only thing right about the model. But, hey, you going to wait for the
carferry to put the correct CGW model on your layout some night?
Clark Propst


Re: CB&Q to IHB Friday 10-Jul-59

Ray Meyer
 

I guess my browser doesn't render the page very well. The border areas are
truncated. But I did get the Excel list and the first line clarified things
for me. Thanx.

On 9/18/07, Bruce Smith <smithbf@auburn.edu> wrote:

Ray,

What's confusing? Try the first line of that page ;^)

"All Time List of Sunshine Models Kits (compiled by Jim Hayes) -
updated March 2007- (PDF Format) or (Excel format)"

You can click on either the embedded hot links for the PDF or Excel
files

In addition, they are in this group's FILES section under Sunshine
Kits List.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

--
Atty Raymond G. Meyer
110 E. Main St
Port Washington, WI 53074
262-284-5566
rgmeyer2@gmail.com


Re: CB&Q to IHB Friday 10-Jul-59

Tim O'Connor
 

Paul

Being an engineer, technical correctness is what I strive for... :-)

But in truth, the later cars are not physically exactly the same as
the earliest cars -- AB brakes instead of KC, for example. So that
is why I wrote "3 cars" in "9 variations". I believe most people on
this list are able to parse that information without getting overly
confused -- and they should always consult the Sunshine PDF
anyway, before ordering the cars. The PDF describes each kit
and also lists the price of the kit.

Anyone who has built Sunshine kits should know: many of the
kits are not 100% accurate as they come. Minor tweaks and/or
substitutions must be made, and it helps a lot to have prototype
information for your era at your fingertips. For example I model
the late 1950's forward, and Martin's information often stops at
around 1950 -- so he may not know that a reefer lost its fans, or
a roof hatch was removed, etc etc. But we shouldn't have to put
disclaimers in every email, since this is the nature of prototype
modeling.

Tim O'Connor

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: cobrapsl@aol.com

Tim,
Although, technically correct, I do not think most people on this list think of
a model, or kit,?variation as a different set of decals.

Paul Lyons
Laguna Niguel, CA


Re: PRR X29s in passenger service (was: CB&Q to IHB Friday 10-Jul-59)

jerryglow2
 

Do you recall what issue?

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@...> wrote:

Andy, would it kill you to check your facts before posting? It's
true
that some express service Class X29 boxcars received new trucks (most
commonly 2D-F12 coil-elliptical trucks), but contrary to what many
believe, very few cars received GSC express trucks (despite that
overpublished builders photo of PRR 100688 that people draw this
assumption from), and many cars retained their 2D-F8 trucks when
converted from freight service. See my atricle in TKM for more
details.


Ben Hom


Re: CB&Q to IHB Friday 10-Jul-59

Jim & Lisa Hayes <jimandlisa97225@...>
 

The Sunshine list can also be found in the STMFC Files area.



Jim Hayes

Portland Oregon

_


Re: Reverse Creco Door questions

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Jim Mischke wrote:
"So it is a Pullman design, not a Creco.
Did anyone else besides CGW avail themselves of this door?"

Clark Propst replied:
"I'm pulling this out of my rear, but I think Red Caboose did one
other road, very small road..."

That's probably the High Point, Thomasville & Denton cars, which
were a tall version of the 1923 ARA boxcar (NOT the later 1932 ARA
cars).
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/gallery/boxauto/hptd424main.html

The doors on these cars were NOT identical to neither the CGW
Pullman carbuiders' doors nor those used on the B&M/MTC 1923 ARA
boxcars.


"...and there was another 1932 car with those doors...Mexican?"

NdeM. See Ed Hawkins' 1932 ARA boxcar summary and Ted Culotta's
book for more information:
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/prototype/frtcars/1932arapdfmain.html


I'm in complete agreement with Ted regarding these doors - the
misunderstanding regarding these doors is is another piece of
modeler's folklore that needs to be ruthlessly stamped out.


Ben Hom

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